The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 9 months ago

Elevating the Sales Profession: Women’s History Month

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We’re wrapping up this month’s episodes by observing Women’s History Month. You’re about to learn from some of the best insights by female sales leaders that we’re proud to highlight on our podcast.

Celebrate with us by listening to these selections from 4 of our standout guests (and check out their full episodes for more excellence).

Today on Sales Engagement, you’ll hear from:

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Hey folks, it's under me born. Now, before jumping in, I've got to tell you about on leasttwo thousand and twenty one. On May eleven through thirteen, were focusing onhow to win together in the new sales era. You'll learn new go tomarket strategies, get deeper funnel insides and actional takeaways for your retire or fromrevenue leaders at Highgro startups and fortune five hundred companies. And are very specialguests or none other than Guy Raz the podcaster and author of how I builtthis and carry lawns, the first female fighter pilot in the US Navy.Come Save Your seat for this high energy online event at only stock outreached outioh. Now let's get into it. Welcome to the sales engagement podcast.This podcast is brought to you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, andthey just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach.Well does outreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead in recordtime after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see howoutreachrus account based plays, manages reps and so much more using their own salesengagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as theydo. Head to outreach, do io on outreach to see what they havegoing on. Now let's get into today's episode. Way, folks, it'sbreak. PACHESTA, welcome back to the sales engagement podcast. We've got somethingreally, really exciting for you. To close out the month marches women's historymonth and to celebrate we're sharing the best moments and insights shared on this verypodcast by female sales leaders who are elevating the sales profession. This is parttwo of a two part series, so if you haven't tuned into part oneyet, be sure to check it out. We're thrilled the highlight its celebrate theseincredible women in sales. Once it like being a woman in a maledominated in industry, both by profession, right, like sales is definitely more, and then also tech as well, so it's kind of like a doubleshot there. Yeah, so I've definitely been the only woman in a roommany, many times and you know, I'd say earlier in my career Iwas probably less comfortable with it. I am than I am today, butI think that there are some things that I've kind of thought about or Itry to stay true to when those situations arise. And the first part is, you know, I've earned that seat at the table just as much aseverybody else at that table has, and most people in the room typically feelthe same way. And so instead of kind of approaching the situation where Ifelt I was coming from a place of adversity or I, you know,was kind of different, I've just kind of tried to think about it aseverybody in that room bring certain qualities and value and me, being a woman, is no different than really the man sitting next to me. We allhave, you know, insights in perspective to bring, and so that kindof confidence certainly makes a difference. I...

...think like anything else, life isabout being prepared and when you're going into a big board meeting or you're goinginto a big presentation or a sales pitch with a really big client or yourmeeting with customers it, you know, whatever it might be, just takingthe steps to be prepared and really knowing your materials makes a really big differencebecause then you're speaking from a place of confidence and that you're the expert andyou don't feel like you need to either validate or over accommodate your being theonly one in the room, and so that would be another thing I'd say. People who tell you they don't prepare and they just wing it are usuallynot telling the truth, just like you said. So coming and prepared makesa really big difference. And then the other thing I'd say, and Ithink everybody kind of has to get comfortable with who they are as a personand what your strengths are and being pretty selfaware about what that looks like.But I think participation in the spirit of just participation isn't very valuable. Participationwhen you think that you can add, you know, value and really makea point and drive some credibility into the conversation is the best way to kindof raise yourself up in those types of situations, and so those are someof the things that have helped me. You know, the other piece Iwould say is if there's an opportunity to get to know some of the otherpeople that you're going to be entering the meetings with or, you know,kind of prepared yourself in that sense, I think that that can make peoplefeel more comfortable. But what I would say for anybody out there who sometimesfeels that doubt, even if you're, you know, a man in aroom with ton other men, you burned that seat at the table and youshould feel validated and not seeking validation. Okay, here's one of the questionsI love to ask. It's kind of a fun one. If I couldmagically make a time machine and you're coming in to my time machine and wego back to your it's a two thousand two twenty four, your year oldself. You're just starting out. Maybe you've got your first, you know, foot in the door at a at a company. You're excited, you'renervous, you're all these things. What would you tell that younger version ofJessica? So that younger version of Jessica was working in a company called supercartNorth America. It was my first job out of college and it was reallylike my well, my second sales job during college. I sold mattresses andthen after I graduated I moved up to selling all plastic shopping carts and itwas a super small company and I had the opportunity to learn a lot ofdifferent things. And so the first thing I would say is be open.I think people are sometimes surprised the skills that they can pick up and thethings that they can learn, and to really have the attitude that you cantake something from everybody, whether it be from your peers, whether it befrom your leaders. You know, having...

Your Eyes Wide Open and, youknow, being comfortable with looking around and learning is something that I just thinkis really critical to growth, and that's not something that, you know,just applies to people who are young in their career. It's, you know, applies to everybody. I'm still learning things every day and I think thatthat's really really important. So being open to learning is one I'd say.Another thing that's really important is to have goals. Understand where you want tobe recognized milestones, are steps that are important to you and make sure thatyou know, you're checking up on yourself, that you're doing those things and ifthey change, that's totally okay, which is making sure that you're reallymindful of what's what matters to you and that you know, at the endof the day, you're moving in that direction and it's it's kind of whereyou want to where you want to be. Love Scott Barker's conversation there with JessicaBruslav, who is now the chief customer officer of Index Exchange. Ournext highlight comes from Ryan Letard, senior director of Global Restaurant Operations and enablement. It slice on owning your career progression. Do you have any strategy? Jeeztips, your tricks for making you rule more than it is contributing alsotaking care of of what they are ultimately paying you to do? Yeah,and I think I've seen that happen so many times, especially with younger employeeswho are early on in their careers where they want to be a manager orthey want to take on more responsibility, and so they focus all their timeon doing listening sessions and other types of management responsibilities, but then they don'thit their sales goal. So I think what I did is I got Igot to the point after doing that job for so long, I was reallygood at it and I didn't need to spend as much time on cold callingas maybe someone else would, because I was a cold calling pro you know, like I knew what I had to do. So I think I alwaysmade sure that I not only hit my goals but overachieved my goals, butI was able to then do that a little bit more easily than it wouldhave been in the beginning. So that was that's my priority, you know, like that's how I get paid, that's what I was asked to doand that's what I was going to do. But then, while I'm hitting mygoal, I was then able to manage my time and figure out,like, all right, I'm working on this initiative with the account management team. I'm going to be in meetings doing x, Y and Z with themduring these times. So like, I need to make sure that I makemore calls in the morning so that I can take off that time in theafternoon or whatever it may be. But I think it's important to always keepyour primary job as your priority and ensure that you're doing that really well andnot focus on things that you're not necessarily being asked to do. Next up, we've got a great moment here with Callingen Manning, formally the director ofsales at easy cater but now the VP of sales at Clara, to sharewith Scott some practical ways to encourage a balanced lifestyle for your team, andit starts at the leader first, really...

...modeling that work life balance for everybodyPhilip listening like, how do you personally find time to balance work? Beinga director of sales is not an easy role. You've got family, you'vegot all these million things in your plate. How you personally find time to takecare of it all? Yeah, no, it's definitely it's a it'sit's certainly a an interesting topic and it's something that I don't think is,you know, easy. Nobody's really totally figured it out yet. I knowpersonally, like I've had jobs, I'm sure like most of us had,where, you know, you go to walk out at five o'clock at theend of the day and you've got those people that look at you like youknow, it's new and what are you doing leaving already? And I knewthat like that, that's it making me feel good as a red so Ididn't want was still kind of that fear and that culture upon the team thatyou know now that now I'm overseeing. So personally, I think you know, I put in my head it's not about the specific hours that you're working. It's not okay, I need to be there, you know this amountof hours every single day. It's knowing that you're getting your work done.Right. So do I leave early some days to, you know, engagein the family stuff I have going on or pick my daughter up from school? Absolutely, and I can do that confidently knowing that I'm getting my workdone. Maybe I'm working after hours, whatever it might be. But Ithink you have to be comfortable to know that you know you're getting your stuffdone and it doesn't matter when you're doing it. How can leaders, fromthe top down, inspire a worklife balance culture? So I think there's acouple things. One, there's the things that people see and there's the thingsthat people don't see. Right. So am I working after hours? Sometimesat night after my family's going to bed. Shore I open on my computer upon the weekend sometimes. I also try and take time for myself,right. So if it's, you know, one of the two days on theweekend, I'm definitely not going to work both of them if I canavoid it. So those are the things that people don't see. If I'mworking after work, it's working on personal stuff, it's that task work,it's queueing stuff up for, you know, making sure that my week isn't overwhelming. It's, you know, crossing stuff off my to do is it'squeueing stuff up in my email Q, but it's not a hitting set.I'm not going to be bothering other people who shouldn't be working just because Iam right. So there's even certain tools out there that consist with this.I use something simple just to Google plug in right now, that you knowyou can queue of that email, have it ready to go, but don'tsend it until Monday morning. People are going to get the way that youwork and the way that you act and they're going to emulate that right.They're gonna they're going to think, okay, if she's working on the weekends andemail that I've got to respond to it work. You know if she'sthe first person here in the office in the morning, that I better beright after her. So we do think that there's a world we live inwhere you know you need to act the way that you're telling people is okayto act. So you know, if it's something early in the morning,great, and I'll work from home in the morning and I'll come in thenormal time that everybody else is coming in. I think just kind of sharing inon that type of culture that you're trying to promote is super important andthen, of course, like hey,...

...if we do have an end upquarter pushing I'm here working late, then yeah, maybe I'm showing that that'sso super important that I could really use some support and closing some of thosedeals. Yeah, again, great practical advice using a scheduling tool. Thisis the sales cagement podcast. The most sales engagement tools like I would reach, will have that that functionality and it's I think it's just being aware,right as a leader, of how your actions are affecting culture. So let'stalk. You had some amazing examples of really practical takeaways. I love thequote of relief one scout scheduling your your emails for different times is awesome.What are some of the things that you implemented at easy cater that promotes amore balanced lifestyles? Get lift really specific here, so not specific to me, but specific to the company. Else. Start there. We have we havingno rules policy, right, so we only implement guidelines for people inthe sales organization. We just say we're going to treat people like adults.We let them manage their day. One of the other things I tell peopleis we could do this box right. So we say okay, yeah,most of the time, within eighty percent of the time, you're working insidethis box. figure out how to be an expert at the things inside thatbox, but also take some time, you know, twenty percent of yourtime to work outside that box, experiment, trying new things, figure out someof the things that we're missing, innovate. So the no rules andonly guidelines has been super helpful. Similarly, we don't have a specific work fromhome policy. So you know, people don't say, okay, Iwork from home on Wednesdays or you know, the day whatever. I need towork from home. If they have a need to work from home,they work from home. You know, they get their job done. Ifthey are working from home, the only thing that we ask is they you'reactually working. If you need to take the time off, just take atouch, a day off, you know, specific to that time off. Ifthey're taking vacation, don't bring your laptop with you. I just haveone of the managers that left for Italy. I specifically said weave your laptop onthe table, don't bring it home with you. Take Email and slackoff your phone. Right if you're getting those notifications, or even if it'sstill an APP on your phone. You know you might be tempted to checkit. So, you know, really make sure that you're using that timeto recharge. Another thing actually that easy cator just implemented is a six weeksto battlegal after your five year anniversary. So it's a little bit different thanour vacation policy where, you know, we're strictly saying like that that's yourtime. Totally check out. You know, somebody else gets acidence of the workthat's on your plates if you're not coming back to that overwhelming workload.You know. So that's something that we've done in is a company that's that'sreally been amazing for employees family things to mean. We also do fun thingsjust so that people know that we care about their family as much as wecare about them. We have an Easter hunt for kids to come in.Similarly, they come in the nature or treat on the office. So,you know, I think we just want people to feel comfortable that their familyis part of their work and work gets into part of their family. Soanything we can do to really promote that...

...that culture of, you know,making sure that they're getting their work done but going home and enjoying that timeas much as possible. It is just so important now. Last but notleast, please enjoy this piece that Andrew Me, board's interview with Nika Mamset sailed enablement and productivity manager. At you to me on how to createa universal language across a team to keep everyone engaged, productive and happy.Yeah, and I think what I'm getting out of this to Nikas that,like you used exercise or as like a common language among many different cultures,many different countries, you know, people around the world. You used onelook there, and that being exercise, to connect everyone in a certain way, which today is super important, right, with everyone being distributed, at leastin the tech world's right be all bias here, but in the techworld we're all disconnected and and it's hard to like, you know, connectwith others and or all enzoomes all day or I talking about multiple different things, you know, consume with work, because we're always technically at work.And so I like how you've really like found another way to connect everyone,and that in enablement is self, is hard, right, like sales enablement, trying to get everyone on the same page, trying to get everyone tolike look at the same points that you're trying to make and like, youknow, brow the boat the same way or roll the power or a nearcase the same way. I. So we're not all going to different directions. Yeah, and the concept of exercise is transferable to like the general ideaof movement, because this still there are a lot of people that are scaredover the word exercise. So you don't want to limit it to those thatare not everyone does it right, but everyone can move. So the factthat you start with something, be energized about it and assume then that everyonecan do it. So to the struggle that you just pointed out with enablement. It is hard and someone once told me that my job is equivalent tohurting cats, and it's funny but it's true. So the hurting cat conceptis like how do you get this disparit today just just different group of peopletogether in one universal language that they can like feel energized about, and it'shard because everyone's hobbies are different. But movements gets people excited because once theystart to accomplish things, they're super proud to come back and say I justdid this and I just did that, and then it becomes infectious because theenergy level in your body, obviously after you move, is different. Soif you've been in zoom fatigue hour after hour after hour and you go actuallyphysically do something, you're totally different person. And then when you come back andyou say, oh my gosh, I just like walked outside ten blocksmore than I did yesterday, you just get so hyped up about it andyou want to share and then that intrigue somebody else to say, Oh,I know I can do that or yeah, Oh, yeah, well, guesswhat I did. So becomes this universal language that everyone can understand nomatter where they're located, and it's also...

...a language of accommodation, I think. So movements is I'd rather use the word movement and energy. It's justit can accommodate all walks of life and get a lot of people charged up. What are some of, like, the success stories you've had? I'mcurious at that, and they can like or like. Are The reps likingit or I are the reps like into this? We talked about it beingour universal language. People are connecting. was that their overall objective there wasto get people to connect, was to get this distribute team closer to oneanother. Like, what were you trying to solve here? There was acouple things. One is we have three main offices around the world, onein Dublin, Ireland, then San Francisco's or headquarters, and then we havean office in Denver. So most of the people that were in those officeswere used to the activity of getting in the office, passing by another personand interacting with them in a it could be about work, but it mostjust social right. So objective number one is to bring the socialization back,because what I noticed is that we were all just on zoom just to getthe work done, and the joy and the fun out of collaborating together wasgone. It was completely robbed because you were just at the sake of beingin a zoom meeting and talking about work stuff, and it became so impersonableand I realized one day. I was like, I don't feel like Iknow these people anymore, nor do I see them having fun with each other. So step one, let's fix that. Let's make sure that there's some commonlanguage of movements and accomplishments associated so that when we get together we canstart off by having that conversation, so much so that when I run enablementsessions. Now I will actually join the meeting a few minutes earlier and Iwill always ask people to share a story as it relates to like their environmentsand something fun. So someone shared not too long ago about a stray dogin their neighborhood and like the whole mission in pursuit to like capture the straydog. I was like, this is so great, like you went outside, you went and you did something, and it just sparks conversation about yeah, like I have a pet or like I saw this, or just anythingto break the ice. That is bringing to the surface the human touch again. So that's solving problem number one, which is bringing us back together ashuman to human versus. What I was fearing is that we became robot torobot. You are a person, I see you right here, but likeit becomes very robotic when it's just two dimensional. So that's number one.Number two for me again, it's energy. Energy is so important all the time, but when you are experiencing what our world is experiencing right now,first with the pandemic and then with the diversity, equity and inclusive inclusion issuesthat surfaced afterwards, and even just the crazy bizarre weather in the bay areawas telling you about, where everyone's scared at any point in time. Youwant to make sure people feel warm, welcome, accommodated, but charged upright and in sales it's just like a...

...constant wave of emotions and if youcan feed off the high energy emotions and bring people up to that level,my goal is always wherever someone came from before interacting with me, they're leavingup on the high note. That is my mission and my goal for everyoneto leave with a smile, to feel like energized, to feel like theymaybe had like extra caffeine for some reason. Then they didn't have to drink anyproblem solving number two is get everyone energized because, as to your pointearlier, as soon as you feel like the momentum going, if you dida physical activity or you've got your motivation up, as soon as you leavethat want experience, you feel like I'm ready to go, like I wantto do this, and you actually can accomplish so problem number three is productivity, because I noticed also that the more we started working from home, thelonger it took to accomplish things, and a good portion of our sales teammostly doing outbound prospecting. They were suffering the most because some of the moreefficient things that they were able to do in an office, when they gotthe buzz from around each other, was gone. Like if you're sitting inyour home and you're the only one there, you don't hear the buzz from theneighbor's phone conversation, so you don't have that ability to like take thatwith you and do your phone calls. So we were noticing a big likeslump in productivity, but it was due to energy and just like the surroundings. So problem number three was just take that energy up for people and helpthem to be more efficient so that they didn't start working longer than they shouldin a day. Very habit. Folks, thank you for tuning into this twopart series where we highlight the best moments from women sales leaders who havecome on our show. What a fantastic way to close that women's history month. I hope you enjoyed it and see you next time. This was anotherepisode of the Sales Engagement podcast to help this get in front of more eyesand ears. Please leave.

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