The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Elevating the Sales Profession: Women’s History Month

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We’re wrapping up this month’s episodes by observing Women’s History Month. You’re about to learn from some of the best insights by female sales leaders that we’re proud to highlight on our podcast.

Celebrate with us by listening to these selections from 4 of our standout guests (and check out their full episodes for more excellence).

Today on Sales Engagement, you’ll hear from:

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Hey folks, it's ender me born nowbefore jumping in I've got to tell you Ahout, I'm least two thousand andtwenty one on Ma, eleen th thiteen were focusing on hatdoing together in thenew sales era, you'll learn new, go to marcet strategies, get deeper, funallinsides, an Actiomal takewast foryour entire, or from revenue leaders at Hig,Gros, startus and fortune five hundred companies and are very special guests,or none other than Guy Ras. The podcaster author of how I built thisand carry laurence. The first female fiterpilot in the US baby come saverseat for this high energy online ebeen at only stop out reached ot IO. Now,let's get into it. Welcome to the sales engagement AFpodcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach. The leading sales engagementplatform and they just launched outreach on outreach the place to learnhow outreach well does nout reach learn how the team follows up with every leadin record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can alsosee how outr rechwins account based plays, manages reps and so much moreusing their own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by datapulld from out reach processes and customer base, when you're done you'llbe able to do it as good as they do, and to outreach on io on out reach tosee what they have going on. Now, let's get into Teday's episode, wayboks, it'sBrok Pachesta welcome back to the sales engagement podcast. We've got somethingreally really exciting for you to close out the month March, is women's historyMonh and to celebrate we're sharing the best moments and insight shared on thisvery podcast by female sales leaders who are elevating the sales professionits his part, two of a two part series. So if you haven't tuned in to part oneyet be sure to check it out or thrilled the highlight and celebrate theseincredible women in sales, once it like being a woman in a maledominated in industry, both by profession, right, like sales, isdefinitely more and then also tech as well. So it's kind of like a doubleshop there yeah, so I've definitely been the only woman in room many manytimes, and you know I say earlier in my career. I was probably less comfortablewith it I than I am today, but I think that there are some things that I'vekind of thought about, or I try to stay true to when those situations arise andthe first part is, you know I' Earne, that seat at the table, just as much aseverybody else at that table has, and most people in the room typically feelthe same way, and so, instead of kind of approaching the situation where Ifelt I was coming from a place of adversity- or I you know, was kind ofdifferent I've- just kind of tried to think about it as everybody in thatroom, bring certain qualities and value and me being a woman, is no differentthan really the man sitting. Next to me, we all have you know insihe inperspective, to bring, and so that kind...

...of confidence certainly makes adifference. I think, like anything else, life is about being prepared and whenyou're going into a big board meeting or you're going into a big presentationor a sales pitch with a really big client or your meeting with customers,it you know whatever it might be, just taking the steps to be prepared andreally knowing your materials makes a really big difference, because thenyou're speaking from a place of confidence and that you're the expertand you don't feel like you need to either valityt or over a comedy, youarebeing the only one in the room. And so that would be another thing. I'd saypeople who tell you they don't prepare and they just wing it or usually nottelling. The truth, just like you said so coming ind prepared, makes a reallybig difference and then the other thing I'd say- and I think everybody kind ofhas to get comfortable with who they are as a person and what our strengthsare and being pretty selfaware about. What that looks like. But I thinkparticipation and the spirit of just participation isn't very valuablearticipation when you think that you can add, you know value and really makea point and drive. Some credibility into the conversation is the best wayto kind of raise yourself up in those types of situations, and so those aresome of the things that have helped me. You know. The other piece I would sayis if there's an opportunity to get to know some of the other people thatyou're going to be entering the meetings with, or you know, kind ofprepared yourself. In that sense, I think that that can make people feelmore comfortable, but what I would say for anybody out there who sometimesfeels that doubt even if you're you know a man in a room with ten other men,you buarn that seat at the table and you should feel validated and notseeking validation. Okay, here's one of the questions. I love to ask it's kindof a fun one. If I could magically make a time Mashit and you're coming in tomy time machine and we go back to our it's itwenty. Two. Twenty four, youryear old self you're, just starting out, maybe you've got your first. You knowfoot in the door at at a company, you're excited you're, nervous, you're.All these things. What would you tell that younger Verseno of Jesica so thatyounger version of Jessica was working in a company called Super Cart? NorthAmerica? It was my first job out of college and it was really like my wellmy second sales job during college I sold mattresses and then after Igraduated, I moved up to selling all plastic shopping carts and it was asuper small company and I had the opportunity to learn a lot of differentthings, and so the first thing, I would say, is be open. I think people are sometimessurprised, the skills that they can pick up and the things that they canlearn and to really have the attitude that you can take something fromeverybody, whether it be from your peers, whether it be from your leaders,you know having your eyes quite open...

...and you know being comfortable withlooking around and learning is something that I just think is reallycritical to growth and that's not something that you know just applies topeople who are young in their career. It's you know applies to everybody. I'mstill learning things every day, and I think that that's really reallyimportant so being open to learning is one I'd say. Another thing that'sreally important is to have goals understand where you want to berecognize, milestones or steps that are important to you and make sure that youknow you're checking up on yourself that you're doing those things and ifthey change that's totally okay, but just making sure that you're reallymindful of what's what matters to you and that you know at the end of the day,you're moving in that direction, and it's kind of where you want to whereyou want to be love. Scott Barkers Conversation Ber with Jessica Bruslav,who is now the chief customer officer of Index Exchange. Our next highlightcomes from Ryan, Leonard Senior, director of Global RestaurantOperations and enablemen at slifes on owning your career progression. Do you havee any strategies, tips ortricks for making a role more than it is contributing, but also taking careof of what they're ultimately paying you to do? Yeah, and I think I've seenthat happen so many times, especially with younger employees who are early onin their careers where they want to be a manager or they want to take on moreresponsibility. And so they focus all their time and doit listing sessionsand other types of management responsibilities, but then they don'thit their sales goal. So I think what I did is I got. I got to the point afterdoing that job for so long I was really good at it and I didn't need to spendas much time on cold calling, as maybe someone else would, because I was acold calling tro. You know like I knew what I had to do so I think I alwaysmade sure that I not only hit my goals but overachieved my goals, but I wasable to then do that a little bit more easily than it would have been in thebeginning. So that was that's my priority. You know like that's how Iget paid. That's what I was asked to do and that's what I was going to do. Butthen, while I'm hitting my goal, I was unable to manage my time and figure outlike all right, I'm working on this inditiative with the Account ManagementTeam, I'm going to be in meetings, doing xyandd with them during thesetime. So like, I need to make sure that I make more calls in the morning sothat I can take off that time in the afternoon or whatever it may be, but Ithink it's important to always keep your primary job as your priority andensure that you're doing that really well and not focus on things thatyau're not necessarily being asked to do next up. We've got a great moment herewith calling Manning, formerly the director of sales at easy cater, butnow the BPOF sales at Chlora. She shares ofh, Scot and practical ways toencourage a balance. Lifestyle...

Frougutam and it starts wit, the leaderfirst really modeling- that worklike balance for everybody, Philip, listen,ING Ikhow. Do you personally find time to balance work? Being a director ofsales? Is Not a rol you've got family. You've got all these million things onyour plate. How you personally find time to take care of it all yeah? No,it's definitely it's. It's certainly an interesting topic,and it's something that I don't think is you know easy nobody's, reallytotally figured it out. Yet I know personally, like I've had jobs. I'm Sur,like most of us, had where you know you go to walk out at five o'clock at theend of the day and you've got those people that look at you, like. You knowit's Nen, and what are you doing leaving already, and I knew that likethat that did make me feel good as a rep, so I didn't want to it still kindof that fear of that culture upon the team that you know now that now I'moverseeing. So personally, I think you know I I put in my head: it's not aboutthe specific hours that you're working, it's not okay! I need to be there. Youknow this amount of hours every single day. It's noing that you're gettingyour work done right. So do I leave early some days to you, know, engage inSenwa, Stu y Hav going on or pick my daughter at Om school absolutely, and Ican do that confidently, knowing that I'm getting my work done, maybe I'mworking after hours whatever it might be, but I think you have to becomfortable to know that you know you're getting your stuff done and itdoesn't matter when you're doing it. How can leaders from the top downinspire a work like balance culture, so I think there's a couple things, onethere's the things that people see and there's the things that people don'tsee right. So am I working after hour, sometimes at night after my familyasgoing to bed shore and I opening my computer up on the weekend. Sometimes Iwill also try and take time for myself right. So if it's, you know, one of thetwo days on the weekend ave definitely not going to work fold with them. If Ican avoid it. So those are the things that people don't see if I'm workingafter work, it's working on personal stuff. It's that task work. It's qeingstuff up, for you know making sure that my week isn't overwhelming it's. Youknow crossing stuff off my Su Dulis, it's qe and stuff up in my email Q, butit's not getting set, I'm not going to be bothering other people who shouldn'tbe working just because I am right so there's even certain tools out therethat consist with this. I use something simple, just ta Google Polin Right nowthat you know you can q up Tan email haveit ready to go, but don't send ituntil Monday morning people are going to look at the way that you work andthe way that you act and they're going to ecemulate that right, they're,Goingna they're, going to tink okay, if she's wearing a weekand, somns emailthat I've got a respond to it or you know, if she's the first person here inthe office in the morning than I gotto, be right after her. So we do think thatthere's a a worldly living where you know you need to act. The way thatyou're telling people is okay to act. So you know if it's something early inthe morning. Rigt Il work from home in the morning and I'll commit the normaltime that everybody else is coming in. I think just kind of sharing in on thattype of culture that you're trying to...

...promote is super important. Then ofcourse Lokkey. If we do have an Ende qorter pushing I'm here, workingly henyeah, maybe I'm showing that that's so super important- that I cun really usesome support. In closing some of those deals, yeah yeah, again great practialadvice, youting, it scheduling, toal this in fesale cage,fot, podcast or most sales engagement tools like o reach will have that thatfunctionality- and it's, I think, it's just being aware right as a leader ofof how your actions are affecting culture. So, let's suck even had someamazing examples of really practical, takeaways and love the quoteof relieafone go: Ask chiduing your your emails for different times its awesome. Whatare some of the things that youbeimplemented at easy cater thatpromotes a more balanced lifestyle? 's get like lealy specific here, so notspecific to me but specific to the company I'll start there we have. Wehaven't no rules policy right, so we only implement guidelines for people inthe sales organization. We just say we're going to treat people like adults.We let them manage their day. One of the other things I tell people is werget in this box right. So we say: okay, yeah, most of the time within eightypercent of the time, you're working inside this box figure out how to be anexpert at the things inside that box, but also take some time. You knowtwenty percent of your time to work outside that box. Experiment trying yewthings figure out some of the things that were missing in amate. So the norules and only guidelines has been super helpful. Simply we don't have aspecific work from home policy. So you know people don't say: okay, wo'rk fromHol on Wednesdays, or you know this day. Whenever I need to work from home ifthey have a need to wor from omen, work, frimg home, you know they get their jobdone. If they are working from Mo the Lin Tope, we ask. Is They you'reactually working? If you need to take the time off, just take it tec a dayoff, you know specific to that time off. If they're taking vacation, don't bringyour laptop with you. I just had one of the managers that left for Italy. Ispecifically said: Leave Your Laptop on the table, don't bring it home with you,take Emailan slack off your phone right if you're getting those notificationsor even if it's still an APP on your phone, you know you might be attemptedto check it, so you know really make sure that you're using that time torecharge another thing, actually that eskater just implemented is a six weekTobatigal after your five year anniversary. So it's a little bitdifferent than our vacation policy, where you know we're strictly sayinglike that, that's your time totally check out. You know somebody else getsa sience of the work. That's on your plates that you're not coming back tothat overwhelming workload. You know, so that's something that we've done inis a company. That's that's really been amazing for our employees, familythings do mean. We also do fun things just so that people know that we careabout their family as much as we care about them. We have an Easter hung forkids to come in. Similarly, they come in and they chock he treater on theoffice. So you know, I think we just want people to feel comfortable, thattheir family is part of their work and work gets into part of their family. Soanything we can do to really promote...

...that that culture of you know makingsure that they're getting their work done, but going home and enjoying thattime as much as possible. It's just so important. Now, last but not least,please enjoy this piece of Andrew Meborn's interview with nikamansedsales, amablement and product tivity manager at eutomy on how to create auniversal language across a team to keep everyone engaged, productive andhappy yeah, and I think when I'm getting outof this too ecause it like you, used exercise Righas like a common languageamong many different cultures, many different countries, you know peoplearound the world. You used one hook there and that being exercised toconnect everyone in a certain way, which today is super important rightwith everyone being distributed, at least in in the Tech Worlds R. You knowI'm being all bias here, but in the tech world, we're all disconnected andit's hard to, like you know, connect with others and ere all on sooms allday right talking about multiple different things you know consumed, butwith work because we're always technically at work, and so I like how Youyouve really like foundanother way to connect everyone and that in enablement, thosself is hardright, like sales enablement, trying to get everyone on the same page, tryingto get everyone to like look at the same points that you're trying to makeand, like you know, brow the both the same way or rol, the Paemord in nearcase the same way I so we're not all go ing to different directions. Yeah andthe concept of exercise is transferable to like the general idea of movement,because there's still, there are a lot of people that are scared, Ofer. Theword exercise, so you don't want to limit it to those that arenot everyonedoes it right, but everyone can move. So the fact that you start withsomething be energized about it and assume, then that everyone can do it soto the struggle that you just pointed out with a Nablman. It is hard andsomeone once told me that my job is a equivalent to hurting catsand it's funny, but it's true. So the hurting cat concept is like. How do youget this dispairit today, just different group of people together inone universal language that they can like feel energized about and it's hardbecause everyone's hobbies are different. But movement gets peopleexcited because once they start to accomplish things, they're super proudto come back and say: I just did this and I just did that and then it'sbecomes infectious because the energy level in your body, obviously after youmove, is different. So if you've been in zoom fatigue hour after hour afterhour, and you go actually physically do something you're totally differentperson. And then you come back and you say: Oh my Gosh I just like walkedoutside ten blocks more than I did yesterday. You just get so hyped upabout it and you want to share and then that intrigue, somebody else to say. Oh,I know I can do that or yeah Oh yeah. Well, guess what I did so becomes thisuniversal language that everyone can...

...understand, no matter where they'relocated and it's also a language of accommodation. I think somovements is I'd rather use the word movement and energy. It's just. It canaccommodate all walks of life and get a lot of people charged up n. What aresome of like the success stories? You've had m curious hat that NHAYCALDlikeare, like are the reps liking. It right are the wepsite into this. Wetalked about it being like universal language. People are connecting wasthat their overall objective there was to get people to connect was to getthis distribute a team closer to one another like what were you trying tosolve here? There was a couple things one is. We have three main officesaround the world on in Dublin, Ireland. Then San Francisco is or headquarters,and then we have an office in Denver. So most of the people that were inthose offices were used to the activity of getting in the office passing byanother person and interacting with them in a it could be about work, butit most just social right, so objective number one is to bring thesocialization back, because what I noticed is that we were all just on zoom just to get the work done andthe joy and the fun out of collaborating together. It was gone. Itwas completely robbed because you were just at the sake of being in a zoommeeting and talking about work stuff and it became so impersonable, and Irealized one day I was like. I don't feel like. I know these people anymore.Nor do I see them having fun with each other so step one. Let's fix that.Let's make sure that there's some common language of movements andaccomplishments associated so that when we get together, we can start off byhaving that conversation so much so that when I run enablement sessions nowI will actually join the meeting a few minutes earlier, and I will always askpeople to share a story as it relates to like their environment and somethingfun. So someone shared not too long ago about a stray dog in their neighborhoodand like the whole mission in pursuit to like capture the straigh dog I waslike this is so great like he went outside you went and you did somethingand then just sparks conversation about yeah like I have a pet or like I sawthis or just anything, to break the ice that is bringing to the surface thehuman touch again. So that's solving problem number one which is bringing usback together as human to human versus. What I was fearing is that we becamerobot to robot. You are a person I see right here, but like it becomes veryrobotic when it's just too dimensional. That's number one number two for meagain: Its Energy Energy is sto important all the time,but when you are experiencing what our world is experiencing right now, firstwith the pandemic, and then with the diversity, equity and cus inclusionissues that surfaced afterwards and even just a crazy bizarre weather inthe bay area. I was telling you about where everyones scared at any point intime, you want to make sure people feel warm welcome, accommodated but chargedup right and in sales. It's just like a...

...constant wave of emotions and if youcan feed off the high energy emotions and bring people up to that level, mygoal is always wherever someone came from before interacting with me they'releaving up on a high note. That is my mission, an my goal for everyone toleave with a smile to feel like energized to feel like they maybe hadlike extra caffeine. For some reason, then they didn't have to drink any problem. Solving number two is geteveryone energize, because to your point earlier, as soon as you feel,like the momentum going, if you did a physical activity or you've got yourmotivation up as soon as you leave that one experience you feel like I'm readyto go like I want to do this and you actually can accomplish so problem.Number three is proactivity, because I noticed also that the more we startedworking from home the longer it took to accomplish things and a good portion ofour sales team, mostly doing outoutd prospecting. They were suffering themost because some of the more efficient things that they were able to do in anoffice when they got the buzz from around each other. It was gone like ifyou're sitting in your home and you're the only one there you don't hear thebuzz from the neighbors phone conversation. So you don't have thatability to like. Take that with you and do your phone calls, so we werenoticing a big like slump in productivity, but it was due to energyand just like the surroundings, so problem number three was just take thatenergy up for people and help them to be more efficient so that they didn'tstart working longer than they should in a day there. You have it folks.Thank you for tuning into this two part series where we highlight the bestmoments from women sales leaders who have come on our show, what a fantasticway to close that women's history month. I help you enjoy it and see an Nex time.This was another episode of the Sales Engagement podcast to help this get infront of more eyes and ears. pleasely.

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