The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

The Right Way to Leave a Sales Voicemail w/ Lauren Bailey

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sales is a confidence sport. You’re beat up all day long with rejections, and it can discouraging until you get that one successful sale that gets you hooked.

That feeling of success is what gets Lauren Bailey out of bed every morning. Not so much feeling it herself, but helping other sales professionals feel successful more often in their work. Lauren is the President of Factor8 and Founder of the new e-learning platform The Sales Bar.

She found her sweet spot in helping sales professionals love the job more by training them to be successful selling over the phone. Email is a comfortable barrier for a lot of sales professionals, but when you skip the sales calls you miss out opportunities for personal connection and engagement.

Lauren walks us through what kills confidence the most when it comes to leaving voicemails and how to do it right to see a 50% improvement in call backs.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast. This podcast is brought to you by outreach dot ioh, the leading sales engagement platform helping companies, sellers and customer success engaged with buyers and customers in the modern sales era. Check out sales engagementcom for new episodes resources in the book on sales engagement coming soon. Now let's get into today's episode. Everyone, thanks again for joining us on the sales engagement podcast. I am your host, Jovi No, senior content managing editor at outreach. We are joined by an amazing woman today, Lauren Bailey, president of factor eight and founder of the new e learning platform, the sales bar. She's gonna be talking about using the phone in your sales process, voicemails, how to get engagement on the calls, all of these things. But I don't want to know. That's a problem for anybody right job things like nobody probably needs that help. Yeah, see those who yeah, if you don't need this, you can tune out right now. I'm pretty sure everyone should be listening, but I don't want to jump in just quite yet. I don't want toss it on over to Lauren, who can introduce herself. I do learn. I'm really great. Thank you for having me. I love like I don't know if I've ever been introduced as an amazing woman before, and I just want to pause and have you talk to my husband, actually my kid. That's pretty cool. Thanks. Yeah, of course, I'm really happy to be here. I will tell you ten seconds about myself. I've got this personal mission in life to help more people feel successful at work, and it's simple in one way, right, and and it says so much in another way. We spend eighty percent of our lives at work and with work people, and I've grown up in sales and sales development and it's a struggle, right, like it sales as a confidence sport and we get beat up all damn day with nobody will talk to me, somebody's not calling me back. I'm getting hung up on. I feel like it's almost like golf, right, we have ten really shitty shots so then you get that one great one and you're hooked that sale. So my mission is to help more of US feel that success more often, and my sweet spot and doing that has been doing frontline training with reps and with managers and sharing techniques about selling over the phone. That help get faster wins and faster successes so we can all feel like rock stars and we go home tonight. I love that. I love it. It's so it's the such a field good mission that you have feel good mission. It helps me get up in the morning and it helps kind of that's my true norse and knowing am I doing the right things right? Are we building confidence? Are we building success in this job of sales? Because right now the average sales rep burns out right one thousand eight hundred twenty four months. They eject, and I think that is absolutely because, well, having done it myself, right, sales it seems like a bravery sport, like I don't want to do what I'm scared...

I do it anyway. But if, instead we can build true confidence and success in it, then I can last much longer. I can enjoy the job every day. I don't burn out at the end of this road and look for something else. I want to continue my career in sales and I think that as sales leaders, all of us have a responsibility to do more of that and help our people love the job more. And that's where I get off. I love it and you're already making me feel more confident about my job right now, just talking to you. So, yeah, done and the podcast. I hope you enjoyed our time today. I love that. Yeah, that'd be make my job easier. But no, let's talk about confidence. Let's talk about the phone. Yeah, that is a uneasy thing for a lot of sales people. They don't like to hop on the phone. They don't like to you know, have to be operating without a safety net of the email, of the the digital barrier. So how do you tell reps that? You encourage repst how you train reps to be more confident on the phone? Well, we have to give everybody a safe space, right, like we've got to let people there's so many ways to build confidence on the phone and there's the truth is, most of us should focus first on the ways that don't build confidence. Frank Clayton, that's that's the hard part. Like, I'm going to go straight out and say I hate scripts. I think that when a leader has success with something that they used to do and they write it in a script and they hand it to a sales rep, that does not say I trust you, you're going to be a Badass, figure it out and do it well, it says do it my way, and that's a bummer because I will never sound confidence say in your words. So I think scripts are one of the first things that kill confidence on the phone. I truly believe instead of teaching people the why, what's the goal of this section of the call right or the sales process? WHAT'S THE WHY? What are you trying to accomplish? Now let's talk about best practices and how to get it done. Maybe here's some message ideas of things that have worked. Now make it your own. Now, let's practice it right now, let's go do it and let's learn from it. Let's look at each one. is a learning experience and a coaching experience. That's at fact right. We kind of build our training that way right where we get reps live on the phones, we do in the classroom and it's safe and then we all go get on the phones and we do it. We celebrate the crap out of it, we have a good time and we coach it, we get it better and then we go on to the next thing. So I think that all managers can do that and treat it like a sales lab to build that confidence instead of whoops that was a fail right. You didn't get the appointment. It was a fail yeah, I love the focus on the why. We have. I've had a lot of guests on here that our big fans of scripts. At the beginning, right as you're just bringing on a new Rep. but are you saying, if you're, you know, fresh in the seat, maybe one month in, to just focus on the why more, just in more enablement, less script? I'm I am yes, and then it really does depend on what resources you have. I know that they're at outreach. You have an amazing sales development leader right WHO's and and training leader, enablement Lee, and so they get time in the classroom to practice these things. So it's not just here's your seat, go make it up as you go along. That is going to fail. I think that's why a lot of US depend on scripts. We don't have that robust rep on boarding and training. But in best practice you're going...

...to help teach people to why. You're going to listen to others, do it good or bad, you're going to get into the voice of the in the head of the customer, right and here from their point of view, and then you're going to make it your own from day one and adjust as you go from there. So I don't know, we're not. It's probably more a leader rant and soapbox, and it is for our individual sellers out there. But if you won't get in trouble for doing it, sellers, then take that script and make it your own. Fill in your own words, find your own best practices and leave room for conversation. Let's talk about the conversations. Yeah, and let's start at the beginning. Okay, perfect, the intro. Can I be honest with you? That's not the beginning. Oh okay, tell me. I'M gonna back you up for a second. Sure, because if it in reality your day one, Joe, here's your phone, right, here's your script, go for it. The first thing you're going to do is leave to on our voicemails. I'm I right? Probably. Yeah, in this day and age, don't pick up the phone. No one picks up the phone. We all get local number recognition so that they think it's the kids daycare and accidentally pick up the phone, and we'll talk about that in a second. But right you're calling and we do get voicemails first. So I think that's one of the first things that we should nail, because goal one is to increase selling in time. It used to be a big thing out there that, you know, coffee is for closers, and I'm sorry that ain't the case. We got to get on first, for it's like money ball. I get on first, yp get the conversation and then keep them on the phone with the intro. Maybe that's second base and now it's just going to go in a weird place. We keep talking about basis, but how about we do voicemails and then intro? This is that cool? Some tips and tricks. Let's do it. Let's do it. Tips and tricks. voicemails. All right, you're doing a hundred, hundred, fifty calls a day. You're connecting with zero people. All the voice mails. All right, common mistakes and how to fix them. Okay, so, Oh, this is fun. I think one of the most common mistakes is done, done, done, number one, selling on voice mail. Big No, big no. The purpose of the voice mail is to get the call back and if you try to sell on voicemail, you're not having that conversation. We could have just hired outbound robots instead of salespeople. Right. So never try to pitch on a voice mail. Common Mistake number two. It's too long, like one thousand five hundred and twenty seconds or less. Hit It, get in, get out, like a good wedding speech. Don't go too long. I was actually at a wedding that was that long the other day. Like I said, down they had a couple jokes, suddenly they were married. I was having beverages. It was perfect. Yeah, it so keep them short, right, twenty seconds or less is what you're looking for in a voicemail. Common Mistake numbers three. This one's going to get dicey out there not leaving the voicemail. HMM. Tons of US don't write. Do you see that too, Joe? Yeah, and I'm guilty of it at times. I'm just you...

...know, I I complete the story in my head. It's not going to matter, they're not going to pick up. I'll just try again. Yeah, exactly, and you will. Right. And when you're using tools like outreach, it's going to remind you, which is great, right, but remember that another like goal one of the voicemails to get the call back and have the conversation. But go to of the voicemail can be branding. It takes seven touches for somebody to actually take some action. Right. You're sending the emails, you're doing the social but voicemail is a touch. Now, if this is a key account you're trying to get a hold of and you're calling every day, I get it. Don't leave a voicemail every day, but if you're going for the ten touches before you punt and try to get the next lead right or the next account or whatever it is, voicemails can and should be touches. So don't hesitate to leave them. Because here's what's cool. Like, you're right, you don't want to be the person who stalks them, but let's be honest, they probably see your number come up anywhere. Then when somebody finally calls you back or when you do finally connect, they kind of owe you one right, like it's kind of like, Oh yeah, I'm so sorry I haven't returned to calls, like they understand. Oh crap, I haven't called Joe Beck. There's a little guilt and I think a salespeople were smart for use that. I love it. I love the playing to people's emotions and kind of leveraging the psychology of obligation. Right, the psychology of obligation is real and guilt is real. In the Catholic churchs has been using it for centuries. I don't know why we can't every once in a while. Now powerful tool, folks. So don't hesitate to leave those voicemails. The key is this, right, you give them the benefit of the doubt. When you're using it. It's voice phone number six. Sure in your head you're like your jerk, call me back, m right, when we just assume somebody's really busy, we kind of give them the best benefit of the doubt. We leave another professional, excellent voice mail. Do you know what most people are thinking is, that's impressive, that's persistent. From right. And then we do finally catch and I like yeah, I think you may have left me a voicemail or two, right, and what you want to say is yea think, but instead you're like yeah, I do think. So I've been really excited to talk to you about and my new amazing which it, or whatever the case may be. So, yeah, that's so. Now you're so those are big mistakes. Rights, we talked about some tips to get those callbacks. Yeah, I know. I was going to ask you. So how our what are some ways to stand out on the voicemail, to be memorable? Yeah, the key is the callback, right, and and to do that we have to let them know a little bit about what you want to talk about, but maybe not all of it, because, let's be honest, not everybody is waiting for a sales pitch. I know that's shocking, right. We're not all excited about getting sold to as as a human race. So here are some tricks that have worked for us and and you're going to find your own. I'm going to give a couple techniques, but I will tell you that when we're teaching these and in live classes, we start to count the callbacks...

...that come and we at a minimum double, sometimes triple or quadruple the callbacks. Now, let's be clear, sometimes that equals actually getting three a day instead of zero. Right, and the bar is low, but wow, you've just tripled your selling time, so it's worth it. So here's the first one I'm going to give you, if you've got it. Use a lever. A lever is someone that you have in common or a piece of information that says I'm not a cold call. Hey, you know me because I know Joe Right, right. So you drop a little lever in there and now that perks their ear up a little bit, like, Oh Huh, I wonder what that has to do with. Hey, this is lauren. I was just talking to Joe and outreach about you give me call back. My number is right and you repeat the number slowly. You say it twice and that's it. That's the whole voice mail. I didn't give a reason. I dropped a lever, which means I also had a little piece of mystery in there. Right, it's a teeth, total old tease folks. Give them a little teas. That works to when you just do mystery. Some of the most successful voice must, believe it or not, is just straight up mystery. Hey, Joe, this is Lauren. I'm calling with the sales bar and we've got to talk. Please give me a call back at and that's it. It's just mystery. I wonder what she's calling about. HMM. I've had people taught say hey, I'm giving you a call about your account activity on your account. You've got to use something that you can't lie right. That works for account managers, not for lead Reps. so you do something that's not obvious about why you're calling. It's not deceptive, but it ain't the whole story. HMM, and people are curious. Again, we're playing to that human side of curiosity. I got this great, great one the other day. It was a hey, Joe, this is Mike. I found your keys. Give me call back. Did I use my key? My keys are in my hand. Let's go on. Here I go. Yeah, the keys to your success. Oh now, how did you feel about that? To follow, I'll burn. Oh yeah, yeah, so that went too far, right, right, wait, I did appreciate. I mean, that would be meb like a good subject line for an email, but I was a little worried. I lost my keys and I felt pretty duped. Yeah, MMMMM. Yeah, so that one went too far. So you've got to find your line. But mystery can go farce. The other thing that can go really far, by the way, is urgency. Right, it's important we talk right away. I need to talk to you before the end of Friday. I need you to call me back today, right when you've got you building that urgency and they can hear it. It's great, and I've made this mistake. We've all made all the mistakes, right, but I left one for a guy I really wanted to talk with Kevin and my friend Kevin, and I heard myself saying, Hey, it's not urgent, it's no big deal. Guess what, my good friend Kevin is not called me back yet. All right, like, did not do myself any favors there, but insttead I can...

...say, Kevin, it's I'll be calling. I need you to call me back quick please. I'm going to get a call back right away, so use it right, use it. It's okay. You're right. You selling your new widget might not be the most important thing in their day, but, ladies and gentleman, is a damn important thing in your day. And if they do not want to talk to you, as we all know, people are not shy. They will get off the phone right they will call you back and if they don't want to keep talking to you, they'll stop talking to you. But give them a chance to hear what you have to offer, because it's fantastic. All Right, I've got one more in that's value right, like, and this is something you're going to hear me talk about in Intros as well. All too often what we're doing is talking about what we want to do, not what's in it for them. We call that swift. So what's in it for them? MMM, instead of the old with them. Right, so what's in it for them? So I'm calling because I want to help you. Blink. I'm calling because I think I can solve X. I'm calling to see if I can had some value. There's a generic one just right there. I'm calling because I think I can add some value as you're setting your budgets for next year. So give me a call quick. I need to talk to you by Friday. I did a little value all there. Right, did a little urgency. Yeah, so these things can work together. Those are voicemails that get returned, and almost all of them have to do with curiosity. Folks. Okay, so you'll have lots of help, I think, for our listeners and especially for me to I leave a lot of voicemails. Now the person's called back. The mystery worked, the urgency worked. Now you have them on the phone and you have a window of ten seconds to keep him on the phone. Yeah, now, don't done dumb. Yeah, right, what WHO's them? Of The mistakes the people make there and then how do you fix those. Yeah, I think one of the biggest mistakes when we actually are like are on first base, is the premature pitch. Right, people don't like to be sold, so you need to add value right away and you need to get them to engage in a conversation with you right away, not a pitch. So that's the reason. You know, we're talking about intros because, let's be honest, most often we talk to people outbound versus in in bound. Either way, your intro is not your value prop now, I know that that's weird to a lot of people, right. Hi, this is Lauren and I'm with factory eight and we're the world's leading resource for inside sales training. Shut up. Nobody really wants to hear the right like yeah, congratuate amulations. What else like it, but it just I tune out. So when you're doing an intro instead, we want to make it a swift intro, right. So what's in it for them? Hi, this is Lauren. I'm calling with the sales bar and I'm calling to see if I can't help you and crease your Roi from your engagement next year. I'm calling to see if I can't save you some time when you're shopping for blank next year. If I'm outreach, I'm saying I'm calling to see if I can't help make your team up to thirty eight percent more effective or efficient...

...or whatever you're solving. We have to tie it into a benefit for them. What do people care about? Save me time, make me money, help me get some control, make my life easier, freedom from risk. Right, looking good. There's lots of core values that we can tie into and intro that makes sense for you and for your company. But the truth is the customers not listening anyway. Right, you know what I mean? Like we try to do the whole pitch up front, Lauren, and this is factory and here's what we provide, here's why we're better and why I've got a customer in your area and I save this other customer, you know, that referenceable customer that saved x percent. They're still not listening to you. Right. So it's a little too early for that's all good stuff, but not in the intro. Why do you think people do that? Why do you think they just word vomit so quickly, right at the beginning? Yeah, you're so right, like you show up and throw up right. I think for a couple reasons, and and I think honestly it's because us as sales leaders, we fail our new people because we don't teach them not to. What we do is when they come out of training, whether it's one on one coaching or a training class, we've taught them every reason why we're great and we've taught him a value prop, and so they go to those two things. We haven't helped it structure it for them to say listen. The first thirty seconds is just getting that person to quit typing email and listen to you, because they picked up the phone on accident. Your job is to get them to engage. That's the goal of the intro. If you do an intro really well, within thirty seconds the customer is talking and then it's somewhere around minute one they say, I'm sorry, who are you with again? Now that might sound like a fail, but, ladies and gentlemen, cue the value prop. The window is open. The window is open and now they give a damn about who you are and it's time now to answer that right. So the INTRO is to get them to stop typing and engage in the conversation. And so one of the other things we teach is that a at the end of that swift intro have to be a few swift questions. Why? Because your goal is to get them talking. When I'm answering your question, I can't also type in my email or read it or whatever it is I'm doing in my multitasking world. Right, except maybe the government, who does actually sit by the phone and talk to people up, if you can handle working with government contracts, they will pick up the phone and talk to you all damn thing. They might not buy, but they will talk to all day. So when we end with those swift questions, we teach people to ask actually closed questions, which again is a little bit of a mindbender because all sales training is open questions. But if I just got you to accidentally pick up the phone and I got you to stop reading email for a second by hearing this little ear perk about some sort of value I'm going to add, and then I drop straight into we've known each other for eighteen seconds and I'm like, Joe, tell me about your biggest problem. You're thinking half off, man, I don't even know you right, right time for this right. So instead we go into hey, are...

...you in the San Francisco office. I see you've been an outreach for five years. Is that right? How many reps do you have today? You ask some sort of I can't help it, answer a question. HMM, almost it comes out of their mouth. So they're talking before they realize they are, and that's the key. You get two or three under those of those out they're talking to you and suddenly it dawns on them somewhere around a minute, minute and a half, and most of my research was like, wait a minute, who's this guy again? And that's when they ask. And it's brilliant because then you've got your value problem and now we move into the explore phase. MMM, is that cool? What do you think of that? I think that's fantastic and super applicable, I'm sure, to everyone listening. I have I sometimes to do both things right. I'll make a call and then I'll just, like you said, show up and throw up, or I'll do just this tap dancing thing for way too long, you know, just hey, so how's it going over there? Oh yeah, yeah, this real smoke you out here today and just the done. This gives it some structure and and some milestones. Right, a minute, like you said, a minute and a half. The three questions. Yeah, yeah, and then, if you want to keep building a little rapport okay, and sometimes so swift questions are report questions, and that can depend on your audience and who you're calling, right. And if you're trying to get entry level and you're trying to get an IT decision maker to talk to you on the East Coast, do not waste time with rapport building questions and then going to fly. Hey, you call on somebody in the deep South and you don't start with those and you've got a problem. So there's a nuance to building what those right questions are and then still let's hold the pitch right. So that's I got to tell that brings me to kind of phase three and, like I said, we're moving in to explore and I know a lot of your listeners are in that Bedr row right. So my job is to get the appointment. So I might not be pitching you on buying my services. What I'm pitching you on an appointment. And Ninety percent of the calls and the call recordings that I listen to are still doing that. Too early. All right, I got you to talk to me. That's great. We've talked about the weather for a second or so. You've asked who I am. I'm calling from? Well, I'm calling to see if I can get an appointment. I'm going straight for the clothes because that's what they're closing for your clothing for time. HMM, and my time is precious. So back up off that for a minute. Buster right and earn it. So all too often in that SDR betr role we're forgetting the let's engage them, let's ask some questions, and some of them can be qualifying. But the key in it, let me put it this way, this is hopefully the most profound thing I say. So don't screw it up, orn. The goal of a BEDR business development call is not the meeting. The goal of the call is engagement. And if we do that, the outcome is the meeting. And and once we wrap our heads around that we start booking lot better meetings. Man. Right, my job is to call up and see if you just might be interested in a free demo of the sales bar.

Now, you don't know what that is. You're not going to agree to a demo when you don't give a damn about it yet. So my job is to poke around a little bit and see if there's a need I can solve, if there's an interest on your side, if there's a dissatisfaction, if there's a gap between current and desired state. My job is to explore a little bit and see if I can help, entice, excite, solve something for you. And if I do that and you're leaning in, you're showing up to that meeting and you're much more likely to buy. Now it's hard because we pay reps on numbers of meetings booked, right, right, but don't forget you're also getting insented on how many of them show and how many of them close. So if we would go into the meeting instead with the true goal of engaging that person on the other side, we do a better job of answering and asking questions. We'd get to know what's happening. We might be a little more curious. Right, you can tell when someone's engaged on the phone. You're getting road answers, their clue. Doing email, your pitch for the meeting. They say no. You pitch again, they say no, you check it off as tried and you throw the lead away. Not that that happens. So if, instead, we actually try to have real conversations with folks, are calls are going to get a little bit longer, and that's okay. If they're really good calls right, and we're going to get them leaning in, they might. How do you know you've got somebody engaged, that they might ask you a question? Right, like that should happen. If it's a good bedr call right, they're going to want to get to know it a little bit. They're going to ask who knows, like how it works or price in question or customer reference or any of those things. That all those are great signs. They're buying signs. That's when you close. Okay. So let's imagine a sales manager listening to this right now and saying, okay, hello, sales manager, this all sounds great. These calls are going to take a lot more time. They well, then, what we're doing right now. How does this scale? How do I justify this, this approach? You know, I do want my repped pounting the phones and getting meetings of pitching hard and moving on to the next one. Yeah, what's in it for me? What's in it for me? So if we do it right. The call is going to last two to three minutes longer than your current call and you're going to see, probably, and I'm not going to guarantee it, but I'd love for you to email me and tell me. I think you're going to see an improvement of fifty percent or more. I've seen three hundred percent improvements. I'm not even lying, three hundred percent improvements in the numbers of meeting books. So you're going in and your cold calling basically like, do you have nothing to do next Tuesday at ten o'clock? Would you like to pretend you're going to show up for this meeting? That's kind of what we're selling now, because nobody's interested. So if we take the time to actually get them a little bit interested, and it only takes two or three minutes, then they do actually show up to those meetings and they say yes right. So the Yes is what you're going to see go up drastically at the beginning,...

...and it's been fun. We have some some kinds where we train the betrs and then we also train the a's that close it, and we got them so upside down in the middle of a month they tripled the number of appointments booked triple. That's what I mean by the three hundred percent, the a's or like what the hang on, hold on, I don't have the room for this right, because people were showing up to the meeting. So it the payoff is that you will see great success. Teach your reps to have good conversations, listen to calls and judge like we do something called the Gage Ameter, right, so that's like one through four. Are they really engaged? Everybody rate it. Listen to just that customer and how do we get that engage? A meter to go up higher to four, or that we call? Sometimes we have this secret level five. Like what does secret level five sound like when somebody really into what you're doing? They're probably reading off their credit card number during during the initial call. That's that's that's what I can't wait. Can I bring somebody else to the meeting? Can I? You know that's like and I know it's we're laughing about it right now. No, I'm not saying that these techniques are going to magically get you secret level five engagement, but if you just know it's out there, right and you know that that's your goal. Is Somebody Saying, oh my Lord, this sounds amazing, this is really cool. Can Ill, let me get on your website right now. Let me ask you a few more questions. Let me get somebody else on the phone. Who else can I bring to that mean? That's the goal, M so it's sort of that, you know, like aim for the stars and land at the Moon. Right. And and now the think back to what we talked about at the beginning. What are the vast majority of US doing? We're leaving long voicemails or no voice mails, we're reading off of script, we're asking for an appointment within one minute of the call. We're pitching as fast as we can't and what we're doing is we're just catching the fruit that's fallen off the tree. When we get a yes, it's somebody who either has nothing going on Tuesday at ten o'cock or, Oh my God, I've been waiting for your call, like I have actually been researching this. I'm super excited to go see what you guys do. Sure, let's check out and it right. And those are the kinds of numbers that we're getting. And it's painful and it's hard and it's no fun. But if we turn it into a game instead about how many people can we get to actually call us back, and how many people can we get to stay on the phone with us and how many? How far can we get these people leaning in one, two, three, four, five levels of engagement? Then we're focused on the right stuff for the customer experienced, and the resulting outcome is more meetings. Yeah, and not just more meetings, right, more meanings held, but the quality of the meetings are going to be so much better because during this process you are helping lead qualify, right here, genuine interest, right. Yeah, yeah, and it's good to qualify thosely. It's absolutely, which is one of their tip I'll say. I know that we just packed this full of stuff, but for people who aren't beat ours, who are out there also doing outbound calling, I really really encourage you to be selfish and do something I call sales qualification. I know it comes in with a lead score and...

...that's their propensity to buy, right, but let's say you got five hundred of those and they're looking pretty good. which ones do you give a damn about? And you can find that out even before you get ahold of the decision maker. We've all had that experience where we're leaving ten voice mails for, you know, the Blah, blah, blah position of the Blah Blah Blah. Right, that direct DM WHO, by the way, is, you know, a fake number. Doesn't work there anymore, not the holy decision maker, etc. Why, instead not call all, for instance, the sales department, and find out if they really do use sales force and how many people work there and if you know, they see a lot of people growing or if the companies like whatever those qualifiers are in your head, that makes it a super hotly. And once we do that, like we do, teach people to like grade their whole book right, like are their lead less? Like, Oh my God, these tens are a's. Watch, like, light it up, baby, there's no more three announce with those leads. You will call all the time, you will leave the voice ones. You are excited because you know it's worth your time. Right. Instead, we treat all these leads the same. So often I'll go in and do these needs analysis and I sit with reckom like. So how do you decide who to call first? And the answer is, I swear to God, while to start with the a's, move my way down to the ZA's right, and great engagement tools fix that for us, right, but we can still go in and be selfish and decide, all right, what's going to get me paid? Who am I going to work harder for? And that's okay, that's just that's being smart. Absolutely. If there was one take away, then we've packed this episode cool by ways, but if there was one that you wanted our listeners to to really focus on, what would that be? I'M gonna go this way because this is for reps and managers find the small winds. Small winds tie all this together. A small wind is how many voice ment call backs you got. If you're grinding it out every day as a rep and you got two people to call you back by yourself a beer, that was fantastic. If you're a manager and you see that your reps are actually having more conversations because their intros are better. And by the way, I look at that at two minutes and over, right, because most voice wils around a minute and a half by the time it's done. If you go colp the number of two minute and over conversations that are happening, and when reps get more of those, you buy them a beer. Like celebrate that. And then the same thing by the way of engagement, the longer conversations, etc. If we can find more ways to feel successful and to celebrate our team success early in the stage, because this is it's the modern workforce. It we're all selling over the phone. We have to include more successes in that Hodge podge and difficult swamp of getting people on the phone to talk to us. And when we celebrate those we feel more successful and a successful feeling leads to a next successful call. Right. That's the big takeaway. Yeah, and you're right. There's like in inertia to success. Right, you have one successful phone call and then another...

...and then another, and suddenly it's very easy to do. It is and it's the flip side. With bdrs. It's like, I'm going to go football for a second. You know, when we just measure and reward conversation, not, pardon me, not conversations, appointments, it's like putting the bedr is, the quarterback back in his own end zone and throwing a pass in a footballs and saying, Hail Mary Baby, let's see how many we get, let's see how many touchdowns we get it. And you are going to get a few, which is fantastic, but the vast majority you're not going to write. So what if instead, we started looking at running play and getting first downs and moving our way down the field and we celebrate a call back, we celebrate a conversation, we celebrate a longer conversation, we celebrate a pipeline for btrs where somebody you schedule a call back with them. We schedule, you know, a call to with btrs, like, let's get strategic about that. Each one of those is a win and you're going to see a lot less burnout and a lot more success, breeding, more success write, a happier, more engaged workforce. I know I enjoy that a heck of a lot more when I've got, like I had ten people hang up all we oh my God, I got a call back. I don't get to go home feeling like a complete loser. I'll take it. Yeah, you need that one win, at least one win, you know, to feel good. Yeah, so what if we can, instead of having one a day, what if we could find a way to have ten X, ten x baby n X. Lauren, thank you so much for being on the show. People wanted to get a hold of you. How could they do that? Learn more about or eight, the sales bar. Yeah, so factor eightcom is where you find us. That's our instructor left training, where we get people alive on the phones and it's sales training built by sales leaders. And now new exciting launch, the sales barcom. That is que two thousand and nineteen. You can check out and get a free trial. We do have voice mails class, we have intros class, we have an engage class, all these things that we talked about today. You can get a free trial and take that training for free. So until the Sales Barcom is up, you can find it also on factorycom. Fantastic, Lauren, thank you so much for being a guest today. A lot of good stuff. I mean, Oh my God, we just talked about show up and throw off. Sorry, look editing team. No, no, this is this has been a pleasure really and I'm I guarantee our listeners are enjoying every good. Everything you said today good. But you got such a cool customer base. How could they not? I love outreach. Oh, thank you so much. And, you know, speaking directly to the listeners, if you liked what you heard today, why do you go to itunes subscribe, give us a good review or even go over to the sales engagementcom website and subscribe there. We really appreciate it and you're doing so much to make the show success, especially with all these great guests we're having on. Thank you, Lauren, and we will see you next time on the sales engagement podcast. Thank you for pleasure. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement coming soon. To get the most out of your sales...

...engagement strategy, make sure to check out our reach Dioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

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