The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

The Emotional Power Behind the Pitch

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At the heart of nearly every professional sales process is the pitch.

When done right, it’s one of the single most effective tools in a salesperson’s arsenal. When done wrong, it’s like watching the lion hunt the gazelle, because in the end, you just feel bad for the gazelle.

But what if there were a way to know the secrets of the presentation? To really be able to nail the pitch every time, with the confidence of a seasoned professional?

On this episode of The Sales Engagement Podcast, we talk with Brian Burkhart. Brian is the Founder & Chief Word Guy at SquarePlanet Presentations.

What we talked about:

  • What makes a great presentation
  • The mistakes that people often make when giving bad ones
  • Why sometimes you should just walk away from a prospect.
  • The importance of knowing your core values and how those inform your presentations

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast.This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, andthey just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach well doesoutreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead in record time aftervirtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see how outreach runsaccount based plays, manages reps and so much more using their own sales engagementplatform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base.When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as they do. Had to outreach Doo on outreach to see what they have going on.Now let's get into today's episode, all right. Well, hello everybody,and welcome back to the sales engagement podcast. My name is brick Pachesta, oneof the hosts here as well as an outreach employee, and I amso delighted and honor to be joined today by a gentleman by the name ofBrian Burkhard Bryant. Thank you for being here today. You know what brandshas met. We have two double bees. It's be square. I know wemeant to do this. It's true. That's probably why we're such good pals. Now to as well. Well, Brian and I are going to betalking about something that I think it's super important for every sales professional,or really anybody in business, and that's driving your sales presentation with your corebeliefs and how to get a really good presentations going for yes, and atthe heart of most every professional sales process is the actual presentation or the pitchthat you do for your prospects and customers. And, long story short, highlytechnical or simply scamming the service, sales presentations are unique and critical opportunitiesto create trust, you connect with folks and, of course, build understanding. If you do it well, suddenly hitting quota can become really easy,but if it's tough for you and you're struggling along the way, you'll soonbe wondering, is this the Gig for me? But the good news issales presentations are a totally learnable skill and...

...the best one to rooted in brainscience. That works no matter what the industry is, nor the audience.Better yet, once you know the secrets to success, you may even findthese pitch opportunities to be downright front. We'll see, like I said,joined by Brian here. He's the founder and chief Word Guy at square planetpresentations, a Phoenix Arizona firm dedicated to elevating people by helping individuals, teamsand enterprise clients improve their pitchkin. And you've been at it for decades literally. So, Brian, for those who may not be familiar, to tellus what a score planet do and what is your role there? Well,first it's awesome to be here, so thank you, Brooke, and I'lltell you that you know what we do as much as anything. As yousaid it, it's to elevate people, and that can sound odd, Iadmit, but our core belief as a firm, but certainly me as thefounder, is that exact thing. The combination of the tools, the resources, the confidence, the stuff that we do with our clients on a regularbasis truly elevates them and we take it very, very seriously, and certainlyit exists at an individual level, but we also do work at both teamand enterprise scale, and so that notion of elevating people, it's really aboutaction, about giving people stuff to make them better, and in the worldof sales that can often include things like actually hitting quota going, yes,as a crucial part. Yeah, right, like we want you to win thefree trip and go to Barbados in February. That sounds amazing. Andso when we elevate people, it's through a bunch of stuff, but wealso do it ways. I mean it's going to sound silly, I know, but things like I text jokes to people all the time for no reason. We go out of our way to say please and thank you and volunteerand do things that truly elevate the humans around us. And even things likeon my own podcast, if we sniff out that people are somehow kind ofmore inclined towards hate versus love, we boot them. Elevating people. He'sa huge part of our world and it's ultimately the way we get paid.I love that. Yeah, proof that...

...you can, you know, doreally well in your career and do what's right. But let's let's get intothis. So tell me, when did you, in the spirit of likepresentations and like connecting with Stokes, when did you actually realize how powerful agood pitch or sales preso could be for you? I love the story andso thanks for even the fun question for me. I can tell you thatI am certainly and this is obviously a podcast. If it's audio only,I have a hunch it is brook. You'll appreciate this. I am notfollically challenged, but I am Verbon for a Middle Age man. I've nevergot the game here, but I'm not tall right. And so I wasin fifth grade running for student council president in the Chicago yes words, yes, okay, gentlementary school, and I was so tiny back then and Ican remember this was a kind of fun thing. was at a whole studentauditorium filled kind of situation, and I walk up to the lecture and Igrabbed the gooseneck microphone and you hear it, I pull it all the way downbecause I was so tiny, and I did my presentation, my stumppolitical speech at the time in Fifth Grade, and I knew right then and there. I mean I knew that I was going to win. I meanto the point of like I actually thought the other candidates might vote for me. And really they just gave you a standing ovation. You're like, Igot this in the bag pretty much and ten years old, like literally,it was that kind of a thing. And I'm not I'm not trying tobe braggadocious in any way. It was because it was totally unknown to me. I didn't know. It was just one of those kind of things whereI had a little bit of confidence and enough skill set at an early agethat I could do such a thing and it was just different than everybody else. And so right then and there, at an early age, I knew, yes, I did win the election in a congratulations. Thank you.Closest Buddy, Jim Leonard, was my vep. We were quite the pair. And the thing that was interesting is...

...right then in there I knew justby my stature alone. I'm like, well, I'm never going to bethat athlete that transcends time and space. I was bright enough, but certainlyin Einstein and so it wasn't going to be about my intelligence. It wasone of those things that I kind of knew in the moment this was goingto be my thing. And so I've spent quite literally decades now learning theart and science of persuasion, of rhetoric, of what all this stuff means.And it's ancient. I mean the stuff goes way, way, wayback. It's not talking about slide decks and power point here. We're talkingright, Plato, socrates, like this goes way back, and so that'swhat I've been at doing for some time now. Wow, and I haveto ask, do you remember what your topic was for your Fifth Grade Speech? Oh, I totally remember. The free lunch is extra recess. Itwas exactly all that kind of nonsense. There's even a photo of it,which probably makes it more amazing to me, makes it quite real. Oh mygosh, my topic as much as anything. What I remember, wasalong the lines of giving kids a voice. I was saying things like we'd befools to think that we can ask for more pizza and we're going toget it just by asking. We have to use our power, we needour voice, and so it was a fairly impressive message that I'm sure Iyeah, I guarantee, was not original, whether our side, I don't knowwhat I was but yeah, it was stolen. Well, that's impressive. And then I have one more about and then I procesls. I'll stopdrilling on the fifth grade speech. But like when you say you nailed it, like was there a feedback loop of some kind where you're like, Oh, yeah, I did a really good job, because I'm just thinking likein remote environments you don't get the same feedback that you might but I'm tryingto think of what the I don't know, similar situation might be here in twothousand and twenty one. The equivalent that I think you're looking for isactually it's truly about a felt sense. I speak to this with our clientsto this day and certainly the environment that...

...we're in. It's odd right,I mean right, what we're doing today. This is not normal. I wouldmuch read in the same room with you where we would be able tomore comfortably feel if things are going well or not so well. It wasvery much a felt sense. Even as a little guy, I could tellone of the things that I'll give you in this is more actionable. Butconsider this. If you were in a live environment like I was as aten year old, if you're seeing eyeballs versus eye lids, two very differentthings. And so let's fast forward to two thousand and twenty one. Evenin Zoom, certainly in real life, if you're seeing eye lids while you'representing, that's actually feedback. That means people are choosing not to engage withyou, they're not looking you in the eye. They're choosing to look ata device or newspaper or whatever the heck it is, and right then andthere you're going to learn what kind of feedback you need. Yeah, Ye, okay, I've got to do something different to keep these folks engaged.So back, even as a little guy, I knew that I had eyeballs,not eye lids, on me. I could feel it palpably in theroom and I think the biggest thing was the adults in the room were theones who are like, holy cow and now is the most impressive group ofadults, but they gave me feedback in the moment that confirmed what I wasfeeling. Well, that's awesome. In thinking about like the eyeballs or saysIlids, like there must be some common things that people get wrong that givethem the ISLID. So, like, what are some of the biggest thingmistakes that people make when they're making it a presentation, sales or otherwise?Great question and a tough answer because it's very voluminous. The biggest thing,number one overall, is to remember that the mistake is really a collection oflittle ones. It's kind of that death by a thousand cuts really what thatis is that people are selfish. We have all experienced this. Heck,some of us have probably done it. Some easy examples are things like ifyou're allotted a thirty minute chunk of time...

...and you go thirty one minutes orlonger, you're taking time that is not yours. You're being selfish. Ifyou throw slides up on a screen and utter words like I know this istough to see. If you can see this, this is what it says. Well, why would you design that way? That's ridiculous. It's supposedto be a visual tool so people can see and you're making it inherently right. Let's see that self fish over and over and over again. It alwayscomes back to that. The thing that is interesting is people don't even knowhow to counter that, and so they might stand the problem, but willthen, Brian, what do I do? How do I fix it? There'sa lot of to it, but the biggest thing when it comes tothis notion of being selfish is people really just don't consider the audience. Theyconsider themselves. They build up right these come using old materials, using stuffthat they know wrong. It's about the people you're speaking to. When yourealize that you're being selfish. That's when you should say, okay, canI fix this myself? What do I need? Some outside help? Yeah, that's that's get inside. So then, when you say that the biggest keyto success is just means selfless in your presentation. Or is there anotheraspect there that's really well said? Actually, I mean I think it's just give. As I like to say, the root of the word presentation ispresent as in happy birthday, marry, Christmas. You're actually getting the giftright. You're giving like that. Yeah, and too often people give a lousygift. I mean no one wants to receive a lousy gift. Youwant a good gift. And so, if you think about it from thatperspective, a selfless act of presenting is to give something awesome. That meansyou have to put the time in, you've got to do the due diligence, you've got to really think it through, maybe even practice, which lots ofpeople don't. But there's so much that can really be done to makeincremental steps forward. Progress is actually quite simple, and I think the bigthing here is no one is really, in corporate America, at least,trying to be the next mlk or Obama,...

...greatest presenter. All, we needyou to be as effective. There's no great that all the end ofthe day, for yours. Hast order great sales presentation, you get agold medal. No, doesn't work that way. Just get the sale andthe way you do the right factive. So it's just a little bit differentway of thinking. Yeah, and I guess what I'm thinking about, youknow, like being selflessn't really focusing on your prospect or, I guess,the receiver of your presentation. That sounds fantastic, but when you're doing alot at scale, it can also seem overwhelming. So, like, whatare some ways to create a repeatable or systemic process so that you've got youroutline and you're not, you know, having the right whatever peel or surprisewinning script, email, etcetera, for every single prospect? I love thisand I think what you're really asking is, how can you automate this? Right? Yes, I like to not make of myself as lazy, justtrying to be efficient, you know. You know, I think that's areally great way of putting it. It's not about being lazy, it isabout using your time efficiently. I think your spot on Brook and so manyparts of the sales process are about using tools to automate, to create efficiencies, whether it's a simple crm or your SDRs, to help get things movingfrom the get go. I mean you gotta use some things. Presentations areno different. It starts first and foremost, and this is going to get everso confusing, so please hang with me. You got to know whatyou stand for as an individual. We've got to know what you believe,and this is deep. This is that aristotle, socrates, Plato stuff.Once you know what you stand for, where you know what your core beliefsare, you then try to align, have congruence, if you will,with a firm that believes the same things the organization that you work for.You want to be fully aligned in your core values, your core beliefs asa human in the organization, and then you're going to look for prospects thatbelieve the same things. So that may not sound like a process or aframework for automation just yet, but hang...

...with me on this. If youknow that the stuff that you stand for essentially never change, it's like forme, you're going to have to work really hard and, by the way, you're never going to succeed to somehow, some way tell me that people don'tmatter. My core belief of elevating people. It's deep, it's real, it's unwavering. Those that work here they understand that coming to work atmy company, Square planet, that that's a part of what we do.There's a really high likelihood that if they believe the same thing, they're goingto want to work here. If they could care less about people, thisis not the right fit. So inherently we have this duality of core beliefsright there. We've already systematized the way we think. We've automated the notionthat our values over are aligned. That's huge. But here's the part whereit gets troublesome. Is How many people have actually taken the time to codifythe things they stand for? How many have really look deeply at the organization'swhere they hang their hat every day to say, am I incongruence with whatthey stand for as a firm? And this is again another one of thosefelt senses. You know, you know, you know. If you work ata place where you like man, it's just something's off. Might notbe your boss, your colleagues just something there's probably not an overlap of corebeliefs. Once you get that thing nailed, it's easy to automate because now yourpresentation is based first and foremost on the shared set of values. Thinkabout it from the standpoint of if I at square planet was going to goout to outreach and pitch our wares, I would say we're all about elevatingpeople. I would talk about how we've done it. We'd be an easything. Now if I wanted to go up the street to Amazon or toMicrosoft, I could certainly do the same kind of thing. I'm using thesame language because nothing's changed. I still believe that where it gets harder isif the prospect doesn't let's use Amazon, for example, which actually a kindof ours, but you know in the news right now it can be debatable. Do they actually hear about people?...

Are they elevating people? If wedon't have that crossover, if we don't have that overlap, there's a prettygood chance we're not going to work together. And so having really clear core beliefsas an individual and the firm you work for codified. That's how Iautomate this thing, Kusha. So it sounds like just seeking out like ratherthan trying to, like, finash your presentation to every potential some prospect outthere. You refine your list of prospects, are like your Tam or however youwant to think about it. To folk further is that overlap, sowhen you're presenting they'll be speaking the same language. You got that so right. I'm high fiving you. Virtually you know this, and probably everyone thatlistens to this podcast knows this. The best salespeople often achieve those ranks ofsuperstars for a number of reasons, but clearly one of them is they jettisonbad prospects quickly. They're not going to waste their time, energy, efforts, etc. Chasing their tail on a prospect that's never going to convert.And the easiest way to know is by understanding that notion of core beliefs.What you essentially want is a ven diagram. You want a little overlap of youas a human, the firm you work for and your prospect all havea shared belief. If you don't move on, because even if you getthe sale, the relationship is miserable and likely unproomfortable. It'll take too muchtime for the service team or the whatever it takes, it'll suck the lifeout of you. You want the congruence to really occur, and salespeople getit. Don't even waste right those that don't, that don't believe the samething totally. And is that like what we're talking about now? Is thiswhat you mean where it comes to brain science in the biology of presentations likethis seems fantastic, but like, I guess, how would I test forthat? You certainly could. The crazy part is it actually is stuff thatI racle. Evidence can actually be formed on this versus just anecdotal. Thebrain science part is a little bit different...

...and it goes really to our oldreptilion brains. Some people call it the CROC brain, as an alligator crocodile, but it's the Amygdala, which is a really deep portion of the brain, small little chunk where a number of chemicals are secreted, and shockingly,science has proven this to be true. There are a number of them,but things like oxytosin. This is a really good chemical. We like oxytocinand things like stories where we have shared beliefs create oxytosin. It feels good. You're more flexible, as in neural plastic. Wise you're more open toideas you're in a good mood. Imagine, let's let's use politics, for forexample. If one side is super liberal and the other side is super, super conservative, there's not much overlap there. Remember my congruence thing,right. So, if you're doing a sales pitch and you're talking to aprospect who doesn't believe what you believe, no oxytosin it's quite the opposite.It's cortisol, it's the other chemical that's part of the futter flight. Andso in this case, two different beliefs, we get defensive and all of asudden it goes to hell. And so it really is one of thosethings where, chemically speaking, science speaking, if you know your core beliefs thenyou can state them and really clear, easy story based ways. Your potentialprospect, if they believe the same thing, will light up, chemicallyagree and feel good about you. If they disagree with your beliefs, Defensemechanisms come up, chemicals Serge to their brain that say I want to beatthis person and move on. It's science. Yeah, is there a way tosalvage that? Say you find that there's like a negative reaction happening.Can you save it or that point do you just important mission? Oh,you aboard mission. You can try to say save it, because there arealways additional factors involved. I mean it's one of those kind of things whereyou know you might be able to give such a ridiculous discount to stave,to save the sale, that the prospect will say, okay, I'm goingwith you, even if it feels wrong.

Number of reasons that I can makea case that you can salvage it, but I would tell you it's notworth it. Find a better prospect. Yeah, yeah, a good point. In the long run, whether you're managing them or your success teamor whomever, will not, like you said earlier, will not be awesomefor that's exactly and all I need. We talked about evidence a little whileago. Here's my evidence. Just date for a while, but I meanreally think about all the you know, x's that we've all probably had inour worlds. It's like that's just didn't feel quite right. Well, yeah, I can tell you why. It's brain chemistry, you know. True, true, every time I'd think about sales, there's always a congruency betweendating and sales, and it's yeah, because you're working with people, andI guess that's why it's interesting too. I'M COMING UP ON MY sixteen weddinganniversary, who congratulations, and my wife was a psychotherapist and way more pleasantand smart and beautiful and all the things. He's, all the things that Iwish I was. We've talked about how our feelings for each other areso much deeper. I didn't say better, I didn't say worse, just deeper. And sure that's part of the time of being the other for sixteenyears. You've got all these experiences. But think about it with the bestclients, the ones that you've served for the longest amount of time, itjust works right. It just feels easy and good and if you miss adeadline or if your over budget, you're not that concerning. You don't wantto disappoint them, but you know you're going to make it work. It'sno different. It's just it's the same processes of marriage, if you will, or partnership, certainly partnerships in business, those that believe the same things.It just works. It just does. Yeah, yeah, and it is. It's nice when it does. And now I'd like to ask you. I can you tell me about a time where either something went really,really well, and maybe you know more recent than the fifth grade speech,example, really well and perhaps really wrong...

...as well. I'll give you thewrongs because these are always more fun. They will end on the positive.Maybe a couple of years ago we were doing a project for Jim Beam,as in the Bourbon folks, and I read about this in my book andI remember my editor. She said something like you know, if you putthis in your book you're never going to work with them again. Yeah,I know, it's so I it's send it. Yeah, there's no riskof Jim being like, we'll send it now, they're already met. Theyit's I didn't really know this, but at the time I've since learned ofdistiller of spirits like Jim beam. They don't really sell to us, theconsumer, they sell to distributors. Distributors then put bottles of Booze and storeshelves and restaurants and etc. And so the distributors are their clients, andoften these are some humongous companies with billionaire founders who fly their Gulf streams andthey make a lot of do the distributors. Well, we were in Las Vegasat the Wind Hotel for the annual Jim beam distributor conference their clients.This was the biggest event that they do and they pull out all the stopsfor this. I mean they spend crazy money, millions of dollars, withall kinds of celebrities. I mean like I got to work with me lacunistsand Justin Timber Lake and fifty cents and it was all nice. That's cool. And so we were working on the keynote presentations for the five sea suiteleaders, including the CEO, and then all the brand managers. This isa big project for us and we were doing great with everyone, but theCEO. He had been on the job for about a year and he had, of course, a very strong pedigree, strong resume, and we kept justsort of butting heads and he had said to me something along the linesof well, you don't understand my audience, and I said, well, no, you don't understand. There is no difference between your audience and everyoneelse. I'm glad that you think they're special, but they're not. They'rehuman beings like you're. No, well,...

...yeah, and so it was oneof those kind of things where we just did not drive and I meanwe tried and we did the best job we could and we continue to providedeliverables, but we're out in Vegas. It was after some rehearsals that wenthorrible. He just did a terrible job. We knew he was going to crashand burn. So I was with one of my colleague and so Isaid that's and I this is funny. I wasn't, wasn't thinking this way. Broke, but now all comes full circle. I said to her,let's look for eyelids versus eyeballs, and she knew what I was talking about. It's a room, pull out our IPHONES, we go to the littletimer thing, stop watch, and it's the opening keynote of this big,huge conference with millions of dollars spent. The first guy on stage is theCEO, and I'm looking to see how long it's going to take before Isee the glow of someone's phone, because I know he's going to be quick, that he didn't do the work, he didn't listen to us, hewasn't paying attention, and so I start the clock upon his voice over relationshipand please welcome Joe blow. He takes the stage, clock starts I'm holdingit. Twenty seven seconds before it's like a thousand people in the audience andI'm harsh. I never never look at the stage, I'll look at him. I'm looking at the audience. Bam, twenty seven seconds and then within likethree minutes there are probably thirty phones. Within ten minutes there were hundreds andhe had a six. So brutal. Lasted like thirty eight minutes. Hewas twenty some minutes short. WHO's awful. He didn't listen to us, he didn't do the work, he did everything wrong. He was totallyselfish. He didn't engage the audience, he didn't care about connecting with people. It was just brutal and I was like, dude, I told youand you refused to listen, and so that didn't go well. We've donenone. I've done no work with Jim beam since we did it a bunchof product, and so that wasn't all bad. There was a little sorI guess that's okay. So take away from that is, if you areconsult he's probably listen to them. Second, engage with your audience, tell stories, be a bit more selfless.

Otherwise we'll get the eyelids exactly right, exactly no good, no, good, no right. Want to be yeahfrom the side. Nobuy. No, you got a good one for usto end on. When years thinking, man, this person crushed it.I got lots of good ones. That's the cool part is more oftenthan that we've got lots of good ones. One that really is impactful to methis notion of understanding your core beliefs. It can seem esoteric, it couldseem difficulty even put a finger on, but it really deeply matters. Wewere working with. The firm was Transamerica, you know, a huge, multi bazillion dollar firm, bunch of different divisions, but this was theretirement division, which is a bunch of years ago. He has since movedon. The President of the division. It was just an absolute prince ofa human, I mean just a great guy, deeply resident, emotional kindof guy, and we were in his office, just a small little kindof satellite office basically in Silicon Valley, and it became very clear to methat he had really lost his way. Couldn't remember what his purpose was,didn't know. Is Why, if you will hmm, which is ultimately thethings you stand for, your core belief and so I've known for a while, could kind of inherently figure it out. gave him some words and the nextthing you know he was like bursting into tears, very emotional wow,and he said, you know, I've been doing this for thirty years,how come nobody ever told me this stuff? So well, it's really hard tobe honest. You're the boss, who's going to tell you? Andso it was one of those kind of moments where that sort of insight andclarity it ultimately changed everything. We help them with a year over year increasein sales of four billion dollars. That's with a be wow your I'm goingto take as much credit for that as we possibly can, but I meanit wasn't just us, I'm aware, but it was us too, youknow. Yeah, that thing that we experienced that moment. It changed everythingand I just always appreciate his humility and...

...hubrists and willingness to go to aplace that most won't. But once you can crack that code and get reallycomfy with it, it's pretty powerful. Definitely. I mean I've learned somuch in just our short time together. But if folks listening or myself wouldlike to go learn more, like what would be some good resources you couldpoint us towards to here comes the shameless plug, which I always love that. Yes, we have a very cool program that is designed specifically for salespeople. It is called the pitch elevator. It's a combination of incredible, veryreal tools resources. By that I mean like we're going to give youa scripts and slides, stuff you can say and things you can use visuallyto make a huge dent to your presentation. It also includes an amazing community ofpeers and then, finally, hot seat coaching twice a month. Youget the choice, if you so volunteer, raise your hand and, in frontof all these people, do your thing and I'll give you the VelvetHammer, which is very loving but probably good funk to the head about yourpresentation. So the pitch elevator is a six month program. It's awesome.That's one. But the best way to do that is to simply go toa square planetcom as in round earth. We do, as I said earlier, lots of work with people one on one, but certainly at a teamand enterprise level. And the other thing that I'll tell you. As muchas anything, this is not for the faint of heart. This is forthose that really want to be amazing. I mean you know this. Somethinglike seventy percent of all salespeople fail to a quota. Well, I'm notinterested in working with those at the bottom of that that. There's a bunchat the top. There's a bunch of those people that desperately want to berock stars, that want to hit quota. Those are my folks. If you'reone of those people that really want to crush it and make a namefor yourself and move up and get those awesome presidents club trips, great,give me a call. That's the kind of people that really make a bigdifference and we can help. I love it all right. Well, youheard it here first, folks, Brian...

Burn Card. That's from square planet. Check out our website. If they want to get in touch with you, can I just find you on Linkedin? Oh, for sure, and Iwould say you know, certainly square planets the easy way, but youcan just even shoot info at square planetcom and it goes right to my desk. There you go, all right, direct line. Well, this isawesome, Bryan, so great to chat with you. I learned to time. Thank you so much for sharing your time and your knowledge with us andyou have a wonderful rest of your afternoon. I certainly appreciate you. Are Soamazingly warm and genuine. Brook, you're just a delightful person. Oh, thank you. Thank you for that, but I just want to say thankyou to outreach as well for giving me a chance, of course.Yeah, all right. Well, that's IT, folks. Have a wonderfulrest of your day and we'll tetch you on the next episode. This wasanother episode of the sales engagement podcast. To help this get in front ofmore eyes and ears, please leave us a shining five star review. JoinUS at sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in the book on sales engagement. To get the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure tocheck out outreach, that ioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See youon the next episode.

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