The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

The Emotional Power Behind the Pitch

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At the heart of nearly every professional sales process is the pitch.

When done right, it’s one of the single most effective tools in a salesperson’s arsenal. When done wrong, it’s like watching the lion hunt the gazelle, because in the end, you just feel bad for the gazelle.

But what if there were a way to know the secrets of the presentation? To really be able to nail the pitch every time, with the confidence of a seasoned professional?

On this episode of The Sales Engagement Podcast, we talk with Brian Burkhart. Brian is the Founder & Chief Word Guy at SquarePlanet Presentations.

What we talked about:

  • What makes a great presentation
  • The mistakes that people often make when giving bad ones
  • Why sometimes you should just walk away from a prospect.
  • The importance of knowing your core values and how those inform your presentations

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Welcome to the sales engagement, apodcast, this podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagementplatform and they just launched out reach on our reach. The place to learnhow out reach well does not reach learn how the team follows up with every leadin record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can alsosee how out retines account based plays, manages reps and so much more usingtheir own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulledfrom out reach processes and customer base when you're done you'll be able todo it as good as they do had to outreach on io son out reach to seewhat they have going on now, let's get into the day's episode all right, well, hello, everybody andwelcome back to the sales engaged. My podcast, my name is brick paces, one ofthe hosts here, as well as an outreach employee, and I am so delighted inhonor to be joined today by a gentleman by the name of Brian Burkhard Brian.Thank you for for being here today. You know what Brandis is met. We have twodouble bees. It's B Square I now or meant to do this. It's true. That'sprobably why we're such good pals now too, as well? Well, Brian and I are going to betalking about something that I think is super important for every sale,professional or really anybody in business and that's driving your salespresentation with your core belief and how to get really good presentationsgoing for you and of the heart of most heavery professional sales process isthe actual presentation or the pitch that you do for your prospects andcustomers and long story short, highly technical or simply scaring the servicesale presentations are unique and critical opportunities to create trust.You connect with Mokes and, of course, build understanding. If you do a wellsuddenly, hitting quota can become really easy, but if it's tough for youand you're struggling along the way, you'll soon be wondering, is this theGig for me for the good news is sale? Present agents are totally learnableskill and the best ones are rooted in...

...brain science that works no matter whatthe industry is, nor the audience better. Yet once you know the secretsto success, you may even find these pitch opportunities to be downright fun.We'll see so, like I said, John by Brian here,he's a founder and she's born guy and score planet presentations, a PhoenixArizona, firm, dedicated to elevating people by helping individuals, teamsand enterprise clients improve their pitch GIN and you've been at it fordecades, literally so Brian for those, you may not be familiar and tell uswhat a scare planet do and what is your role there? Well first, it's awesome tobe here. So thank you brook and I'll tell you that you know what we do asmuch as anything. As you said, I it's to elevate people, and that can soundodd. I admit, but our core belief is a firm, but certainly me as the founderis that exact thing: the combination of the tools, the resources, theconfidence, the stuff that we do with our clients on a regular basis, trulyelevates them, and we take it very very seriously, and certainly it exists inan individual level. But we also do work at book, team and enterprise scaleand so that notion of elevating people, it's really about action, about givingpeople stuff to make them better and in the world of sales that can ofteninclude things like actually hitting quota going. Yes, as a Cretae, we wantyou to win the free trip and go to Barbados in February. That soundsamazing, and so, when we elevate people it's through a bunch of stuff, but wealso do it in ways. I mean it's going to sound silly. I know, but things likeI text jokes to people all the time for no reason we go out of our way to sayplease and thank you and volunteer and do things that truly elevate the humansaround us and even things. I got my own podcast. If we sniff out that peopleare somehow kind of more inclined towards hate versus love, we boot emelevating people as a huge part of our world and it's ultimately the way weget paid.

I left that yeah proof that you can.You know, do really well in your career and do what's right. But let's, let'sget into this, so tell me: When did you in the spirit of like presentations andlike connecting with o? When did you actually realize how powerful a goodpitch or sales preso could be? For you? I love the story, and so thanks foreven the funny question for me, I can tell you that I am certainly- and thisis obviously a podcast if it's audio only I have a hunch. It is brook you'llappreciate this. I am not policy challenged, but I am be for a middle aged man. I've never gotthe single hero, but I'm not tall right, and so I was in fifth grade running forstudent council president in the chicards. Yes, okay, elementary school-and I was so tiny back then- and I can remember this was a kind of fun thing.It was a Stew, a whole student auditorium filled kind of situation andI walked up to the lecture and I grab the goose neck microphone and you hearit go. I pull it all the way down, because I was so tiny and I did mypresentation, my stump political speech at the time. In Fifth Grade- and I knewright then- and there I mean I knew that I was going to win- I mean to thepoint of like I actually thought the other candid it's my vote for me andreally they just gave you a standing ovation. You're, like I got this in thebag, pretty much I'm ten years old, like literally it was that kind of athing and I'm not I'm not trying to be Bragadocio in any way. It was becauseit was totally unknown to me I didn't know it was just one of those kind ofthings where I had a little bit of confidence and enough skill set at anearly age that I could do such a thing and it was just different thaneverybody else, and so right then an there at an early age. I knew yes, Idid win the election in a congratulation. Thank you than closesbuddy. Jim Leonard was my v. We were...

...quite the pair, and the thing that was interesting is right.Then, a mere I knew just by my Tasherie, I'm like. Well, I'm never going to bethat athlete. That transcends time and space. I was bright enough, butcertainly no lines time, and so it wasn't going to be about myintelligence. It was one of those things that I kind of knew in themoment. This was going to B, be my thing, and so I have spent quiteliterally decades now learning the art and science of persuasion of rhetoric,of what all this stuff means, and it's ancient I mean the stuff goes way wayway back. It's we're not talking about slide decks and power point here, we'retalking to right. A Plato. Socrates like this goes way back, and so that'swhat I've been at doing for some time now. Wow- and I have to ask: Do youremember what your topic was for your Fifth Grade Speech? Oh, I totallyremember memory. Lunch is extra recess. It wasexactly all that kind of nonsense. There's even a photo of it, whichprobably makes it more amazing to me, makes it quite real. Oh my gosh rytopic as much as anything. What I remember was along the lines of givingkids a voice. I were saying things like we'd be fools to think that we can askfor more pizza and we're going to get it just by asking. We have to use ourpower, we need our voice, and so it was a fairly impressive message that I'msure yeah I guarantee was not original, whether I don't know what it was but yeah I astolen. Well that's impressive, and then I have one more about and then Ipromises I'll stop grilling on the fifth grade speech, but like we say younailed it like. was there a feedback? Loop of some kind were like wow yeah. Idid a really good job because I'm just thinking like in remote environments,you don't get the same feet back that you might, but I'm trying to think ofwhat the I don't know. Similar situation might be a here in twothousand and twenty one, the equivalent that I think you're looking for isactually it's truly about a felt sense. I speak to this with our clients tothis day and certainly the environment...

...that we're in it's odd right. I meanright what we're doing today. This is not normal. I would much run you in thesame room of you where we would be able to more comfortably feel if things aregoing well or not so well, it was very much a felt sense, even as a little guy.I could tell one of the things that I'll give you- and this is moreactionable, but consider this if you were in a live environment like I wasas a ten year old if you're seeing eye balls versus I lids to very different things, and so, let'sfast forward to twoad twenty one, even in Zoom, certainly in real life, ifyou're seeing eye lids while you're presenting that's actually feedback.That means people are choosing not to engage with you they're, not lookingyou in the eye, they're choosing to look at a device or newspaper orwhatever the heck it is, and right then, and there you're going to learn what kind of feedback you need. Yeah.Okay, I've got to do something different to keep these folks engagedso back even as a little, but I knew that I had eye balls, not eyelids on me.I could feel it palpably in the room and I think the biggest thing was theadults in the room were the ones who were like whole league. How and not isthe most impressive group of adults, but they gave me feedback in the momentthat confirmed what I was feeling well, that's awesome and thinking about, likethe eye balls versus I lit like there must be some common things that peopleget wrong that give them the island so like what or some of the biggest thingmistakes that people make when they're, making at a presentation, sale orotherwise great question and a tough answer, because it's very voluminousthe biggest thing number one overall is to remember that the mistake is reallya collection of little ones. It's kind of that death by a thousand puts whatthat is, is that people are selfish. We have all experienced this heck. Some ofus have probably done it. Some easy...

...examples or things like if you'reallotted a thirty minute chunk of time and you go thirty one minutes or longer,you are taking time. That is not yours, you're, being selfish. If you throwsides up on a screen and utter words like I know, this is tough to see. Ifyou could see this. This is what it says. Why would you design that way?That's ridiculous! It's supposed to be a visual tool, so people can see andyou're making it inherently here. I am to see that selfish over and over andover again, it always comes back to that. The thing that is interesting.These people don't even know how to counter that, and so they might relandthe problem. But well then Brian. What do I do? How do I fix it? W L there's alot of to it, but the biggest thing when it comes to this notion of beingselfish, because people really just don't consider the audience theyconsider themselves, they build a branscome using old materials usingstuff that they know wrong. It's about the people you're speaking to when yourealize that you're being selfish. That's when you should say: okay, can Ifix this myself or do I need some outside help? Yeah T S let's get insideso then? What do you say that the biggest key to success is just beingselfless in your presentation or is there another aspect? There? That'sreally well set actio I mean I think it's just give. As I like to say, theroot of the word presentation is present as in happy birthday, MerryChristmas you're actually getting together right, you're, getting likethat yeah and too often people give a lousy gift. I mean no one wants toreceive a lazy, you want a good gift, and so, if you think about it from thatperspective, a selfless act of presenting is to give something awesome.That means you have to put the time in you've got to do the due diligence. Yougot to really think it through, maybe even practice which lots of peopledon't, but there's so much that can really be done to make incrementalsteps forward. Progress is actually quite simple, and I think the big thinghere is no one is really in corporate...

America least trying to be the next M LK or Obama greatest presenter. All we need you to be as effective, there's nogreat metal at the end of the day, for you to Ha to orter great salespresentation, you get a gold medal, no doesn't work that way, just get thesale and the way you do it right active. So it's just a little bit different wayof thinking yeah, and I guess what I'm thinking about you know, like beingyourself, wasn't really focusing on your prospect or I guess the receiverof your presentation that sounds fantastic or when you're doing a lot atscale. It can also seem overwhelming so like what are some ways you creative,repeatable or systemic process, so that you've got your outlie and you're. NotYou know having the right whatever pealer surprise, when a script, emailet cetera for every single prospect. I love this and I think what you'rereally asking is. How can you automate this right? Yeah? I Not Mak myself as lazy just tryin tobe efficient. You know, you know, I think, that's a reallygreat way of putting it. It's not about being lazy. It is about using your timeofficially. I think your spot on Brook, and so many parts of the sales processare about using tools to automate to create efficiencies, whether it's asimple cr m or your str, to help get things moving from the get Gill, I meanyou got to use some things. Presentations are no different, itstarts first and foremost, and this is going to get ever so confusing. Soplease hang with me. You got to know what you stand for as an individual.We've got to know what you believe- and this is deep. This is that aristotle,socrates, Plato stuff, once you know what you stand for when you know whatyour core beliefs are. You then try to align have congruence if you will, witha firm that believes the same things. The organization that you work for. Youwant to be fully aligned in your core values, your core beliefs as a human inthe organization and then you're going to look for prospects that believe thesame things, so that may not sound like a process or a framework for automation.Just yet, but hang with me an this, if...

...you know that the stuff that you standfor essentially never changes like for me, you're going to have to work reallyhard and by the way, you're never going to succeed to somehow some way. Tell methat people don't matter my core belief of elevating people, it's deep in real.It's unwavering those that work here. They understand that coming to work atmy company square planet that that's a part of what we do. There's a reallyhigh likelihood that if they believe the same thing they're going to want towork here, if they could care less about people, this is not the right set.So inherently we have this duality of core beliefs right there, we've alreadysystematized the way. We think we've automated the notion that our valuesover are aligned, that's huge, but here's. The part where it getstroublesome is how many people have actually taken the time to codify thethings they stand for. How many have really looked deeply at theorganizations where they hang their hat every day to ssay? Am I incongruence with what they stand for as a firm, andthis is again another one of those felt senses? You know you know, you know ifyou work at a place where, like an it's, just something's off, might not be yourboss, your colleagues, it just something: There's, probably not anoverlap of core beliefs. Once you get that thing nailed it's easy to automate,because now your presentation is based, first and foremost on the shared set ofvalues. Think about it from the standpoint of if I at square planet wasgoing to go out to outreach and pitch our wares, I would say we're all aboutelevating people. I would talk about how we've done it would be an easything now. If I wanted to go up the street, to Amazon or to Microsoft, Icould certainly do the same kind of thing, I'm using the same languagebecause nothing's changed. I still believe that, where it gets harder isif the prospect doesn't- let's use Amazon, for example, which actuallyclint of ours, but you know the news...

...right now, it can be debatable. Do theyact here about people? Are they elevating people if we don't have thatcross over? If you don't have that overlap, there's a pretty good chance,we're not going to work together and so having really clear core beliefs as anindividual and the firmy work for codified. That's how you automate thisthing Gosha. So it sounds like just seeking out like, rather than trying tolike finish your presentation to every potential prospect out there. Yourefine your list of prospects or, like your Tam or, however, you want to thinkabout it to folk, for there is that overlap. So, when you're presentingthey'll be speaking the same language, you got that Sol right, I'm high fivein you virtually. You know this, and probably everyonethat listen to this podcast knows this. The best sales people often achievethose ranks of superstar for a number of reasons, but clearly one of them isthe Jedaan bad prospects quickly. No they're not going to waste their time,energy efforts, etcetera, chasing their tail on a prospect. That's never goingto convert, and the easiest way to know is by understanding that notion of corebeliefs. What you essentially want is a ven diagram. You want a little overlapof you as a human. The firm you work for and your prospect all have a sharedbelief if you don't move on, because even if you get the sale, therelationship is miserable and likely unroutable it'll take too much time forthe service team or the whatever it takes. It'll suck the life out of you.You want the congruence to really occur and sales people get it, don't evenwaste right, those that don't that don't believe the same thing totally,and is that like what we're talking about now is just what you mean when itcomes to brain science and the biology of presentations like this seemsfantastic, but, like I guess, how would I test for that? You certainly could the crazy part is.It actually is stuff that empirical evidence can actually be formed on thisversus just anecdotal. The brain science part is a little bit differentand it goes really to our old reptilian...

...brain some people call it the Crockbrain as in alligator crocodile, but it's the Migdala, which is a reallydeep proportion of the brain small little chunk where a number ofchemicals are secreted and shockingly science has proven this to be true.There are a number of them, but things like Oxyton. This is a really goodchemical. We like Oxyton and things like stories where we have sharedbeliefs, create oxyton. It feels good. You are more flexible, as in neuralplastic, wise, you're, more open to ideas, you're in a good mood. Imaginelike let's use politics. For example, if one side is super liberal and theother side is super. Super Conservative there's not much overlap. Thereremember my kingron thing right, and so, if you're doing a sales pitch andyou're talking about prospect who doesn't believe what you believe, noOxyton, it's quite the opposite. It's Cortusa, it's the other chemical,that's part of the thutter flight, and so in this case the different beliefswe get defensive and all of a sudden. It goes to hell, and so it really isone of those things where chemically speaking science. Speaking, if you knowyour core beliefs, then you can state them and really clear easy story basedways your potential prospect, if they believe the same thing, will light upchemically agree and feel good about you. If they disagree with your beliefs,Defense mechanisms come up chemicals surge to their brain. That say, I wantto beat this person and in science yeah. Is there a way to salvage that say youfind that there's like a negative reaction happening? Can you save it orat that point, do you just support mission? You A board mission. You cantry to say save it, because there are always additional factors involved. Imean it's one of those kind of things where you know you might be able togive such a ridiculous discount to stave to save the sale that theproceptiaing with you, even if it feels...

...wrong there's a number of reasons thatI can make a case that you can salvage it. But I would tell you it's not worthit find a better prospect. Yeah yeah good point in the long run, whetheryou're managing them or your success, team or whomever it will not like yousaid earlier, will not be awesome for that. Exactly and all I need we talkedabout evidence a little while ago. Here's my evidence just date for awhile. I mean really think about all the Y. UK O xes that we've all probably had in our world. It's like aces didn't feelquite right. Well, yeah! I can tell you why it's brain chemistry, you know true true every time I t think about sales,there's always a congee between dating and sales and it's yeah, because you'reworking with people- and I guess that's why it's interesting too, I'm coming up onmy sixteenth wedding anniversary, who congratulations, you and my wife who'sa psychotherapist in way, more pleasant and smart and beautiful, and all thethings these all the things that I wish I was we've talked about how ourfeelings for each other are so much deeper. I didn't say better, I didn'tsay worse, just deeper and sure. That's part of the time of being together forsixteen years. Ye've got all these experiences but think about it with thebest clients, the ones that you served for the longest amount of time. It justworks right. It just feels easy and good, and if you miss a deadline or ifyou're over budget you're, not that concerned an you, don't want todisappoint them, but you know you're going to make it work. It's nodifferent! It's just it's the same processes of marriage. If you will orpartnership, certainly partnerships in business, those that believe the samethings it just works. It just does yeah yeah and it it's nice when it doesand now I'd like to ask you, can you tell me about a time where eithersomething went really really well? And maybe you know more recent than thefifth grade speech example really well...

...and perhaps really rol wrong as well. I'll give you the wrongs, because theseare always more fun. They will end on the positive. Maybe a couple years agowe were doing a project for Jim Beam as in the Bourbon folks- and I'm writeabout this in my book- And I remember my editor- she said something like youknow. If you put this in your book, you're never going to work with themagain yea. I know it so it seater's no risk of Jim being.Like me, fended now, they're already met they it's. I didn't really knowthis, but at the time I've since learned a distiller of sperience likeJim Ban. They don't really sell to us the consumer. They sell to distributors,distributes then put bottles of booze and store shelves and restaurants andetc, and so the distributors are their clients. And often these are somehumongous companies with billionaire founders who fly their golf streams andthey make a lot of del the distributors. Well, we were in Las Vegas at thewindow, hotel for the annual Jim beam distributor conference, their clients.This was the biggest event that they do and they pull out all the stops. Forthis I mean they spend crazy money, millions of dollars with all kinds ofcelebrities. I mean, like I got to work with me, La Cunis and just inTimberlake and fifty cent, and me I was a nice, that's cool, and so we wereworking on the Kino presentations for the five c sweet leaders, including theseal and then all the brand managers. This is a big project for us and wewere doing great with everyone, but the so he had been on the job for about ayear and he had, of course, a very strong pedigree strong resume and wekept just sort of butting heads and he had said to me something along thelines of well. You don't understand my audience and I said well, no, you don'tunderstand. There is no difference between your audience and everyone else.I'm glad that you think they're special but they're, not they're human beings,like you, no Oh yeah, and so it was one...

...of those kind of things where we justdid not dive, and I mean we tried and we did the best job we could and wecontinued to provide deliverable, but we're out in Vegas was after somerehearsals that went horrible. He just did a terrible job. We knew he wasgoing to crash and burn. So I was with one of my collies, so I said that's,and this is funny. I wasn't wasn't thinking this way brook, but now it allcomes. Will Circle. I said to her: Let's look for eyelids versus eye ballsand she knew what I was talking about. It's a go, pull out our I phones. We goto the little timer thing, stop watch and it's the opening key note of thisbig huge conference with millions of dollars spent the first guy on stagesto co and I'm looking to see how long it's going to take before I see theglow of someone's phone, because I know it's going to be quick that he didn'tdo the work. He didn't listen to us, he wasn't paying attention, and so I startthe clock upon his voice over Elas one. Please welcome Joe Blow. He takes thestage. Clock Starts, I'm holding it twenty seven seconds before it's like athousand people in the audience, and I'm already. I never never even look ata stage. I don't look at him. I'm looking at the audience, Fam Twentyseven seconds and then within like three minutes. There are probablythirty phones within ten minutes there were hundreds and he had a six o bridallasted like thirty eight minutes. He was twenty. So minutes short, it wasawful. He didn't listen to us. He didn't dothe work. He did everything wrong. He was totally selfish. She didn't engagethe audience. He didn't care about, connecting with people. It was justbrutal and I was like dude. I told you and you refused to listen and so thatdidn't go well. We've done none. I've done no work with Jim Beam, since wedid it a bunch of product and so that wasn't all bad. There was a little STU. I guess that's it. Okay, so take awayfrom that is. If you hire a consult, you probably listen to them. Second, engage with your audience. Tellstories be a bit more selfless,...

...otherwise we'll get the eyelids exactlyright, exactly no good, no good! No, I wont to be Yeah. MINOBU got a good onefor us to end on one you're like man, this person crushed it. I got lots ofgood ones. That's the cool part is more often than that. We've got lots of goodones, one. That really is impact to me. This notion of understanding your corebeliefs. It can seem esoteric, it could seem difficulty even put a finger on,but it really deeply matters. We were working with the firmest trans, America,you know huge multi, basilian dollar, firm, a bunch of different divisions,but this was the retirement division. This is a bunch of years ago. He hassince moved on. The President of the division was just an absolute prince ofa human. I mean just a great guy, deeply resident emotional kind of guy,and we were in his office just a small little kind of satellite office,basically in smoke in valid, and it became very clear to me that he hadreally lost his way. Couldn't remember what his purpose was didn't know is why,if you will M- which is ultimately the things you stand for your core beliefand so I've known for a while could kind of inherently figure it out gavehim some words and the next thing you know he was like bursting into tearsvery emotional, and he said you know I've been doing this for thirty years.How come nobody ever told me this stuff said? Well, it's really hard to behonest, you're, the boss, who's going to tell you, and so it was one of thosekind of moments where that sort of insight and clary it ultimately changedeverything we helped them with a year over year, increase in sales of fourbillion dollars, that's with a b wow sure I'm going to take as much creditfor that as we possibly can. But I mean it wasn't just as I'm aware, but it wasUS too. You know yeah that thing that we experienced that moment. It changedeverything and I just always appreciate...

...his humility and Hubris and willingnessto go to a place that most won't, but once you can crack that code and getreally compy with it, it's pretty powerful. Definitely I mean I learnedso much in just our short time together, but if folks, listening or myself wouldlike to go, learn more like what would be some good resources, you can pointus towards to here comes the shameless plug, which I always love that, yes, we have a very cool program that isdesigned specifically for sales people. It is called the pitch elevator. It's acombination of incredible, very real tools. Resources by that I mean likewe're, going to give you a scripts and slides stuff. You can say and thingsyou can use visually to make a huge denter presentation. It also includes aan amazing community of peers and then finally hot seat, coaching twice amonth, you get the choice if you so volunteer, raise your hand and in frontof all these people. Do your thing and I'll give you the velvet hammer which aloving but probably good, funk to the head about your presentation, so thepitch elvar is a six month program. It's awesome, that's one, but the bestway to do that is just simply go to a square planet com. As in round earth.We do, as I said earlier, lots of work with people one on one, but certainlyhad a team and enterprise level and the other thing that I'll tell you as muchas anything. This is not for the Fane of Heart. This is for those that reallywant to be amazing. I mean you know this something like seventy percent ofall sales people fail to move it quota. Well, I'm not interested in workingwith those at the bottom of that that there's a bunch at the top there's abunch of those people that desperately want to be rock stars that want to hitquota. Those are my folks, if you're one of those people that really want tocrush it and make a name for yourself and move up and get those awesome.Presidents called TRIPS. Great. Give me a call, that's the kind of people thatreally make a big difference and we can help. I love it all right. Well, youheard at your first folks, Brian for...

...card, I'm from square planet check outtheir website. If they want to get in touch with you. Can I just find you onlinked in Oh for sure, and I would tell you you know certainly square planetsthe easy way, but you can just even shoot info at Square Planet Com, and itgoes right to my desk there. You go all right, direct line. Well, this isAustin. Brian was so great to chat with you. I learned to time. Thank you somuch for sharing your time and your knowledge with us and you have awonderful rest of your afternoon. I certainly appreciate you are soamazingly warm and genuine brook you're, just a delightful person. No thank you.I thank you for that, but I just want to say thank you to outreach as wellfor giving me a chance of course, yeah all right. Well, that's it folks, havea wonderful rusher day will catch you on the next episode. This was another episode of the SalesEngagement podcast to help this get in front of more eyes and ears. Pleaseleave us a shining five star review join us at sales engagement com for newepisodes, resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out ofyour sales engagement strategy, make sure to check out out reached tio. Theleading sales engagement platform see you on the next episode a.

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