The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

4 Pillars of Sales Enablement Process w/ Paul Bleier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In the mid-2000s, your employee engagement was about 53%, which is, frankly, not ideal.

Now, it’s 84%, and your salespeople are telling you they hope you’ll continue peer-to-peer sharing in open office hours in 2021 because it’s been super helpful.

In this episode, I interview Paul Bleier, Director of Sales Enablement at TELUS Business, about building a sales enablement process.

What we talked about:

  • Tech: the cornerstone of the tech stack is…
  • Process: the 4 pillars and what they mean
  • People: being a change agent

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast,this podcast is brought to you by outreach, the leading sales engagementplatform, helping companies, sellers and customer success engaged withfuyers and customers in the modern sales era, checkout sales engagementcomfor new episodes, resources and the book on sales, engagement available onAmazon and Barns and noble or wherever books are sold. Now, let's get intotoday's episode, hello and welcome back every one to these sales engagement,podcast, you're hanging ut with Scott Barker, and very excited for thisdiscussion. Thank you as always for lending us, your ear drums for the nextthirty minutes, or so I am joined by Paul Lyar. Did I pronounce your lastname right? I should have done this before we hit record Paul Blair, PaulBlair. There you go I should have. I should have guessed that Paul welcometo the show man. Thank you. Thank you. Scott very excited to be here yeah.This is Goinna, it's Gongnao be cool one and so for the listeners. Paul iscurrently the director of sales enmablement at Tellis business, and youknow I could go into your background a little bit. Y'vebeen there for nineyears, which is increible run. Congratulations. Can you just for thelisteners, give a quick kind of background and I usually say you know,tell us tha the superhero origin story of Paul, absolutely yeah. I have been there nineyears and it's been an amazing nine years, Scott, so my background and howI got to sales. An avlman is quite unique in the sense that I started outmy career in training, an organizational development. I went toschool in the US University of Wisconsin for about a year and a bit todo a Master's program, and I really really wanted to get closer to people,but in a business context, and I landed...

...my way into training and organizationaldevelopment started out. My early part of my career working at a big fortune,one hundred consulting firm, called Hagrep, which was purchased by CornVerry a couple years ago, and that's where I kind of learntd the insand outsof HR people in culture, Career Development, compedency development,coaching. So I I was an HR generalist, Scott for about four for five yearsworking with companies like Caterpillar and Fhizer astrosanic got to work onsome really neat projects, all with a leadership development, training, Kindafunction built into that did that for a couple years- and I realized you knowwhat I really want to go in house- I really want to go to a one companywhere I can see projects not just from start to finish, but I can actually seethe culture that those programs create and I found tellus at the time back intwo thousand and eleven tellus was really future forward. Thinking, Scottin terms of their approach to learning and development. They were all big intousing technology to drive formal, informal and social outcomes. I meanthis is years before the idea of a sales ennablement textstack even was onthe radar, and so I found a director there that was doing some really coolthings. I got a job supporting customer solutions inside of Tellis Atas, alearning consultant which had our sales organizations had our corporate storeshad our marketing groups, and I was really exposed to the world of TelloCommunications for about three years, and then I realize you know what I wantto get closer to business even more and our bibusiness customers and I took ajob with my director. We went out and started something called transformationoffice and it was all about how we can leverage culture to drive the resultsyou want to see within a company and...

...naturally, through that experienceScott. I started working with some of our enterprise, business customers,Portellis business and I fell in love with the idea of how can I apply mybackground and training organizational development learning to help oursellers be the best they can be for our customers e's a lot I want to. I want to hone inon there man. That's certainly not th the traditional path, which is reallyinteresting right, coming up with this hr kind of generalist, background mixedin with the masters in Organizationon Development. It's pretty incredible,and I guess how did you home in on the fact that, because you said something there, thatwas, culture can drive, change right and thinking back at the time that you kindof made that that connection it wasn't. I don't think it was that common to bethinking that that way, what were the light ball moments that were like okay,wait. If we focus on culture, that's going to have an impact, thebusiness outcomes instead of focusing on business outcomes and culture isjust like you know something we think about in a couplemeetings a year and we maybe we put it on the wall as our ten or ten tenthings of culture, and you maybe we go for a happy hour every once in a while.How did you? How did you draw that connection? Yeah culture there's asaying at Telis, Scott, and it's something that really got me enamoredwith the Telles organizdation. We pride ourselves in creating a culture, and weoften say culture is our competitive advantage. The way we take care of ourpeople the way we coach, our team members. The way we supporttheir curer developement and their aspirations to be the best they can bein a chosen field is what our DNA as a...

...company is, and what we saw over anumber of years when I first started at Tellus, is that if you can make minorchanges over time to the way we learn the way we coach the way we in we theway we execute the disions or execute fair process. The way leaders check inand understand the whole person, not just the projects you can see. Employeengagement drive higher, which we did. We went from like fifty two fifty threepercent employee engagement in, like the mid you know, early twoands, midtwohsand and to industry leading employe engagement for a company of oursize and scope at eighty four percent, I think, is where we talked out of, andso companies that we were talking to inthe business contexts are wanting to now more than ever. As we know in thispandemic role and they're wanting to focus Scott on what are the things that can move theneedle in terms of productivity- and I think sometimes you have to look atpeople and the interactions between people, whether it's sales, marketingproduct development and say, are we enabling those individuals to be thebest that they can be, give them the right investments that they can. So Iwas very lucky because tell us is culturr and the investments that theymake in our team members, whether you're in sales or outside of sales, ispretty impressive for a big, a big company in Canada, yeah, and I want to actually take aquick step back, because I think it's important and maybe not every listeneris familiar with tellus and I want. I want to make sure that we we talkedabout the size and the scope of of this this company. So how big is tell usroughly and then how many cellers are you influencing right now or enablingyeah? No so I mean tell us as a tells us an organization I mean we become aworld leading telecommunications and...

Information Tech Company Scott. We doabout fifteen point three billion dollars a year, an annual revenue, andwe now have about just a under sixteen million customer connections acrosswire, earless data, Ip Voice, TV, entertainment, video and security right.So we leverage a lot of those technology investments and our strongfive G and network and our fiber network to really enable businesstransformation and human outcomes. So we're we're very big if we think aboutour sales organizations that I have the privilege. As we talked about oncebefore, to support, I mean it spans different, different business units, soI would say in total I support probably upwards of twelve hundred to thirteeenhundred sales professionals across business unit, such as small business,midmarket, midmarket, small enterprise partner, hostsale tellus health,starting to get into tellus agriculture. Now, which is one of our latestbusiness units and then obviously all of the sales support teams that enablethose tellers to be the best they can be Wewe're starting to do a lot ofinteresting projects with them. Now from an enablement perspective, becausewe need marketing, we need product to understand the life of a salespersontoday, now more than ever, so that they can have the right content the rightmessaging and make sure that that is integrated into the cadences and, mostimportantly, the customer buying cycle and customer buying journey, so thatsales has what they need at every step of the sales process. Meling for so myrole when I started in this role five years ago. Look nothing like it didtoday, but I I love the challenging, and I love that it's not just aboutenabling stales. It's also about...

...supporting marketing and product andoperations, to also understand how hard it is to be a sales person today, nomore than ever, and what they can do to make that life a little bit easierevery day, yeah. I love that and twelve hundredthirteen hundred, that is tat is crazy and I have one more question before Iwant to get to the well, maybe a comment and then a question, and then Iwant to get to the bulk of it, which is unpacking how you built this kind ofworld class sales academy which there's lots of go in there. But you said something there about it'salso about enabling marketing- and I read this quote yesterday- that I thinkis is relevant and true is seemingly in that, like the modern world of selling, marketing seems to bebeing pushed down. The funnel and sales is kind of pushed up the funnel alittle bit, meaning both need to be active, an in much more of the funnelthan we've ever seen before. Anyu mentioned product, which is kind of thenext layer. On top of that, I'll need to be working cohesively. But thequestion I wanted to ask was took thirteen hundred people and eighty fourpercent employee engagement right which, what y? U, you said: YOUV got it up toso even one percent increments here and there on thirteen hundred people have areally big impact, and I know the leaders that I'm talking to rightnow. Employee engagement is a struggle right, like there's all sorts offactors. This year this year has been a tough one. People now have to deal with.You know. Child Care and kids at home and depression is on the rise andthit's all these crazy factors that weren't really part of it anemployegagement is a is a struggle. What were a few levers? You pulled thatthat helped that rise, yeah and our pulsecheck, which is ourengagement scores, just were released for this year last month, Scott and weactually saw...

...really impressive rises in our salesorganizations specifically, and I think part of that can be attributed to the community of practice that we haveestablished to cross our sales channels. You know one of the big things that weinstituted this year, which has really had a meaningful positive impact on thethe mental health and the connection between sales reps with each otherwould be our open office hours. We ran, we run every Friday for ninety minutesFriday morning, eight thirty Aght, thirty am Pacific. You know eleventhirty am eastern and what we did in those session Scot was bring in gestspeakers, whether internal guest speakers, or we even tapped intoexternal speakers, to come in and talk about culture activities, culture, building,things that we could be doing to keep our mental health in our an our grit.You know strong right. We have. We do a lot around health andwellness Scott at tell us. We even have a cheap, neuro science officer at TalaWol. That's it's an MD by trade and her. Her role is to look at all of ourhealth and wellness programs across our fifty tousand person organizationglobally, and make sure that leaders are Quik to have those difficultconversations make sure we ' if team members are struggling. We've got theresources to support them, so we would. We would set up these sessions to notonly bring gas speakers in, but Scott. We also did peer to peer something weactually talked about in one of my team meetings. This morning. Sales peer topeer mentorship is now more important than ever when the leader cannot havethe team physically present in the office, where there's a revolving doorof checking in with the leader...

...throughout the day throughout the week.Why should we not tap into the the high performing sales raps, the ones thatare coaching, the ones that are mentoring each other? Those individualsare just as important to the success of the of the organization as the sales BPor the sales director or the sales manager right, and so we did a lot ofpeer to peer sharing in these open office hours and I think, as stoon ascovid hit back in March, we hade that program up and running as an enablementteam, Scott and maybe about a week and a half. We had our first sessions andwe were averaging anywhere from two hundred to the highest. We got aboutfour hundred sales raped every Friday attending these sessions, so that wasreally great to see and the feedback we got from that when we ended our lastsesin last week was. I hope you guys are going to do that again in twothousand and twenty one, because it was really helpful to me. That's awesome. I love that bringingkind of the keeping the the human element, even as you you know you guys-are massive and you're able to keep that human element, which is so huge,and I love this idea of a chief neuro scientist that I hope every companyover let's say a thousand employees starts- starts finding a chief, narrowscientist, because I think that's such a cool role and sense. That's the mostimportant thing you know: Keep Keep reveryons mental health and brainhealth. Happy and everyone's rocket Yoa know yeah. So that's I mean yeah, Imean one other thing I would say on the you know, going back to the culture,the engagement piece. You know we all have these amazing technology platforms,whether it's slack or whether it's you know Google sites or what have you right? One of the things I think that's superimportant today, and I do this as with my team and and I love it- I love ourso we're a google we're, Google Productivity Organization. We have GSueit and I love Google chat. I love, I...

...love the rooms capability. I love thatyou can share gifts. I love that you can be silly. I love that you can, youknow, be serious and I love our team chat. Twenty four hours a day like Ilove it, we are sharing the ups, we're sharing the downs, we're laughingtogether, we're crying together, we're we're being a human team in a sociallydistance world, and I think a lot of organizations have these tools who, inthat and their organization, but they don't have the right team norms from aleadership perspective to say this is how we're going to show up virtuallytogether and how we're going to collaborate together and how we'regoing to work together and how we're going to share together and how we'reyou know and how we're going to learn together. I would say my Google chatfeed. It's just been a highlight for me as aleader and I hope for all of our listeners out there that they takeadvantage of those investments that their organization is making when itcomes to unified, communicationcions and collaboration yeah. I love that andI agree with kind of reading between the lines of some what you said Thereis,like you know, technology is a huge component lean on it, but it startswith process and people. You know that all that people process technology inthat order an maybe that's a good way to unpack the next thing that will gointo, and maybe let's start at the bottom of this kind of this salesacademy, your building. Now you know I've seen some documentation on itnd.I've checked it out. It's by all accounts. You know a world classprogram so kudos to you for forbuilding that, let's start with with technology,we'll go actually in the opposite order that you're supposed to how are yourreps eabled today? What's the what's the sales Texack at at tellis yeah? Sowhen I, when I started in this job, two...

...thouand and sixteen, the only textstockthat the company really had was salsforcom right and and and at thatpoint it was not even used the right way right, like we weren't e, it waskind of like, Oh God, Scott, like you're, making me going and documenteverything about my opportunity. It was like pulling teeth right and SOS likebig brother Kins like why do you want this yeah exactly but as we sales forcebecame- and I very I remember this meeting so clearly in my in my firstyear- and I was we were meeting with like our director at crm and his goalwas. I want our sales people to view sales forcecom as a destination rightlike we want them to go there and and not feel like it's just about. You knowlike a big brother type activities, as you said, Scott, but I want them to beable to go there to gain instite or or feedback or learn something, and sowith that in mind, as I entered the world of sales enavalment back in twothousand and sixteen as it was just starting to take off, I started lookingfor integrations in sales for ocom and and what we could do to keep peoplethere learning and growing and sharing, and so our textack today consists ofit's not as detail. There's a lot of startups- or you know that I know Ineer te yeah M Ba, but but I would say, we've got salsforecom. We have oursales readiness and outcome based ennavlment program called labhull jump,which is a a video based training platform where you can designinstructional design, programs and measure the results of them againstfunnel against pipeline against opportunities, set measures of successfor those programs, so someone's not just learning something Scot they'reactually practicing it in a private room, they're submitting their pitchvideo they're, getting feedback on it and then they're going to practice itwith a customer and then hopefully that's going to lead to pipeline, andwe can measure that whole learning...

...journey and show Ri. So we've got leveljump which has been my corner stone of my strategy. We've got a count,planning tools with altified smart Account Manager for our midmark and inour enterprise teams, where they can build two to three: your accountsstrategies for our larger customers and make sure that they're growing revenuein different parts of the organizations by building strong relationship mapsand and that account plan s is integrated with sales navigator, solinked in sals navigator was a new investment we made recently, and sowe've bought the research opportunities for raps to understand the buyingcircle and who the decision makers are and are they on the relationship maphand who do I need to go and speak to to kind of accelerate this opportunity. DoI have enough people to actually get a yes, so we'e got sales now vigigatorand then the other big one we have is v playbook by DSG, which is a virtualplaybook platform, and that's where we document all of our sales messagingstrategies. That's where we document all of our operating system, standardsales operating environments, whether you're a sales leader were o Yourecoaching guides for opportunity for funnel for account. How do you coach Yoactivity management and then from a sales executive perpective? They wouldhave it from their perspective of okay you're new to tell us as a salesprofessional. What are the expectations? Scott of you to really align to oursales process, ing methodology so that you can be the best that you can be asa sales professional? So really it's those for key areas. That is ourtexsack. As of this point and we're starting to look at high spot and we'restarting to look at some of those other pieces that will bring product inmarketing more frontand center into the day to day life of the salesprofessional. That's awesome yeah I mean you're, not...

...you're, not the scrappy, siliconevalley startups, but for a large company you guys are definitely havehave some great products. Level jump is a great Canadian success story. I KnowTheyre Co, David David, bloom, cool cool product hi spots, a great one,altefice a huge V play books. Hat haven't checked that out, but Icertainly will that's cool. I love that you know. techanable enterprise is ahuge competitive advantage. I it's kind of mind blowing how if you're a fewsteps ahead like it's over, you can win by the way in which you're selling doest he haveto do anything with with with your product, which is pretty amazing. Okay,let's jump to the next one, which is so we got our technology. How did youthink about process when you're building out thisacademy- and you know you mentioned vplaybooks- so I imagine Yo have thisvirtual playbook, but in today's world like, as you know, things are shiftingso quickly and our buyers are more informed than ever and they havedifferent needs, and this old, like information gap, is no longer there andt there's a whole Su of things. How did you think about process? And how didyou think, more importantly, about okay, let's build the framework in a process,but let's build ine ways that it can be fluid. How did you think about that? Yeah Yeah? So I think you are absolutely right.The Tech, the tech drives the process, but you need the process to understandwhat technology you need from the beginning, and so, if, if I go back tothe beginning, O tell sales academy just very griefly, I mean we werebrought on. Well, I just say you know I was brought on to help build. You knowthe strategy and execute the the vision for learning at the speed of meed. Youknow fo for our sales teams and back...

...then we heard e our Teo heard a lot offeedback at one of our sales, kickoff events in two thousand and fifteen twothousand, and sixteen that said, there's no consistency, Scott to how weon board there's no consistency to how we do our training. There's noconnsistency in terms of career development. Can We build something tocreate consistency? And that's where this concept of our vision for PSO andPSO is we want to become a premmer sales organization? We want to be thebest sales organization in the world for the markets and solutions that weserve right, and so this is our hard envision right. Scott to establish aglobally recognize best in class sales organization, and so we want to seerepeatable success year over year, hyperforming sales teams year over year.We want to have capabilities to address the everyday commercial realities ofour customers right to your point about their changing, so we need to bechanging and we need to have sales executives that have the confidence andthe skill set to be able to. You know have that conversation n with thecustomer about their business outcomes and their their goals and their gapsand how we can help solve that before ever ever ever. Getting to you know forever getting to the products ind the pricing right, you want to have tetsphotegic conversation. So, with those things in mind, we created a standardsales operating environment and it consists of for pillars that we trainto and coach to and execute against. Those pillers are team development,which essentially, is our Telles Sales Academy Program from day one on the jobto when you get promoted up to a sales leadership roll. We have our salesplanning pillar, which is all of the sales methodology around call planningconversation planning, Opportunity, planning, account planning. We have apidlar around funnal health and final management. So how do I manage myterritory and manage my business? And...

...no do I have enough quantity to I haveenough quality are my deals. Moving with Velocity Doni have enough balancewhether that's balanced between products, balance between customers,balance between verticals? What have you that's for the territory of plan toinform and then finally, if you're doing, team development, sales,planning and funnal health properly and tea members know about it, sales rapsknow about it, they're getting the coaching, they need on that weekly byweekly you're, going to see sales extecution, which is the fourth pillar,which is one ours, Teo nr CFO and our salesbps care about it's thoseoperational reviews every month. Every quarter that look at financial salesperformance, funnel health sales activity, measurst recruitment status,right all those pieces. So with that framework in Mindscott, we then builtthe training modules and the training, platforms and programs to be able toallow someone to move through that process if they're, a new seller or ifthey come into our organization with ten fifteen years of sales experience,there's something in it for everyone to learn and hon their craft as a sales,professional m lots of gold in there D. thank you for the the detailedbreakdown. I love those pillars: Team Development, sales planning, funalhealth sales execution, it's a good way to think about t and good operatingframework and then like you're, a seller yourself right. You, like I'mhearing all you're. What you're saying and like you have to be a massivechange agent, yet bying for these things right and that that brings me toe to the last one. So we covered technology that we covered process andthen there's people. You could build the most magical process with all thetechnology enablement out there. But if you can't get, you know those veteransof h, the ten fifteen year, enterprise...

...braps, where all the younger reps lookup to them and they follow what they do. If you don't get their buying for thisyou're dead in the water right, how did you become such a good change? angint?How did you get people to follow you? Let's Talk Awhot the people part for alittle bit, because that's extremely important. Definitely, I think one ofthe things that was working in my favor, that I won't take credit for andremember, there's a team behind me there's an amazing amazing team ofpassionate ennablers and sales operation professionals that want to dothe best for the channel. Right I mean that's. Our woal is to see that highperformance, I would say what was working in our favor- would be the factthat our team sits in the middle of all of thesedifferent sales or organizations we roll. U actually to our CFO. You knowat the ELT level and what allowed us to get close to sales was the fact thatwhen we started this engageing and explore process back in two thousandand sixteen when we were building this program, we had sales DPS at the tablefrom the day one Scott. We had the top performing regional sales directors atthe table from day one. We had marketing directors at the table. Wehad product management at the table and we highlighted the change vision tothem from the from the beginning to say: Look if we're going to become a fastmoving. You know, services organization, to help companies move from legacybased products to the cloud to increase their operational efficiencies and getbetter employee engagement in better employe experience. We need yoursupport and buy an and you know to be able to run this change throughout oursals ind sale, support channels, and that was critical to our success. So webuilt theseplaybooks. I mentioned those...

...those kind of standard sales,leadership, playbooks and standard sales executive playbooks. We builtthose not in isolation. Originally a lot of the tactics came from thebusiness. It didn't come from our team. It came from the business which gave usthe credibility early on in the process Scot and as we moved through the yearswe knew wheour champions were, and we leveraged those champions to stresstest, new programs, new ideas, and you know that you've got voice of sales andsupport when they proactively reach. Out To you and say, Hey Scott, I youknow I've got a challenge something's wrong in this part of my business. Whatcan we top into and tell a sales academy that can help us quickly,correct something that we sees going off the rails, and so I would say toall sales ennavlement professionals out there, whatever you're doing you haveto have your sales leadership with you from day one, and if I look back on alesson learned, I would say I would probably have wanted to get closer tomarketing and product much earlier on in the process. We're getting there.Now we're making huge strides in our product in our marketing organizzationsfor them to understand the day and a life of a sales professional againstour frameworks and against our processes. But I think we could haveaccelerated the transformation internally, a lot more quicker if youwould have had a little bit more bind and support from marketing and producta little bit earlier on in the process hm. That's a a great learning and it'sfunny that you bring that up. It's now come up in a a number of conversations. I've hadrecently that a lot of companies seem to be waking up to the fact you knowthere was always this Tocker Bay. We need better sales, marketing alignment,but product wasn't usually involved in...

...those discussions and now productscoming in more and more, which makes so much sense and hindsight two thousandand twenty. I don't know how we haven't been doing this all along, but yeah. Ithink it's just a Tis, this modes kind of mature- and Ilove what you said about. I think tha the key there is your team wasn'thanded a process and technology and said hereyou go. This is going to work, they built it with you, so they feelownership over the process, which is incredibly powerful and turns them intoadvocates. Everyone wants to be part of something successful that they feellike they've they've built amazing man. Well, I could, I could keep justpicking your brain. You have a ton of ton of knowledge, but we are running upagainst time here and we try and keep thes about thirty minutes. So my lastquestion: I always askd this question. People are super busy comer's. A lot ofgold nuggets in here probably have to go back a and listen to this one againand take some notes. But if people only remember three things from this thiswhole time we spread together at what would you want those three things to be number one? I think sales is a super hard profession and itdoesn't get the respect that it that it's, I think it's so deserves. Youknow, especially today I mean you know our skills, professionals, Scott, thatyou know, are used to going and shaking hands and going for lunch and going tothe customer site to meet a prospect, a they're having to develop thoserelationships now virtually and it's hard and we're seeing people struggle.I think if you are in the enviable position of supporting sales and asales channel, you need to kind of fit your support models into the cadence ofthe sellers day. Right, you don't want tot. You want to seamlessly push thecontent at the speed of meat. I think I...

...said that earlier you want to push thetraining and you want to tie the training or the support to Real,tangible business outcomes right and if you can do that, you're going to getthe mine share right. Everyone, like you, said earlier Scott everyone is sobusy now, with child care responsibilities, doing zoom classes,keeping the kids. You know engaged it's hard. It's really really hard. Today,let's not make things harder. Let's try to find ways to you know bring some ofthat that goodness into their day to day life- and I think what's important-there is doubling down on what I call the social and contextual learningright. I think it has to be contextual if it's not contextual you're, going tolose the sales executive, because They'e goght a thousand other things todo throughout the day. So so that would be number one is what I would say number two. I would say going back to our talk about cultureearlier my advice to sales leaders today, just based on someconversations. I've heard from some of my sales raps across the company. Thisis again going back this his been a really really stressful year right, Ithink my advice to sales, coaches and sales leaders would be. Please start your conversations withyour sales rap today, not by asking about the numbers or the quotaor the Kpis do a whole person check in how are you doing like like thatquestion, to start the sales coaching conversation? How are you doing is sopowerful today, I think more than ever you know a lot of sales rats arestruggling today and they feel the pressure of quota and performancemeasures, and I'm not saying that those...

...aren't important. I'm saying we have toremember that these are people that are struggling and their compensation istied to their sales incensive plan. But before you get to the sales incentiveplan, considerations check in and see how they're doing as a person, I thinkwe'll all be better for that. If we do that as an Oras, a profession, you knowmoving beford mm. I love that and last Tet, not least yougot one more for me. I would you know, I would say you probably know John Barros Yeah Yeah,okay, so John Barris posted something yesterday on Unlinkedin. It was aconversation between him and Morgan Ingram. I believe, and they were justthey were just talking about a very simple thing that you know everyone insales or sale support should think about which is really caring aboutwho's. On the other end of your phone call, Your Voice Melt YourInmaul, your video message right and if we all take a step back and rememberwho our customer is at the end of the day, whether you're selling internallyScott, like I do every day like I have to sell our programs and newinvestments to our VPS and our sales directors or R sales reps, are sellingsolution, ideas or transformation conversations to our customers. If weall take that extra time to really think about the customer mirror rightlike who's on the other end of what we're selling and we take the time todo the research and we take the time to you, know, make sure that our call planis is with has insight and trends andthings that a customer is going to say. Look, you know what Scott is here tohelp me help me in my business and if you take the time to care, if you takethe time to do that, the resulves at...

...the end of the day are going to bethere. You know they're going to be there. So it's about caring about ourcustomers, whether they're internal or external, and I phrase that in a muchdifferent way than Morgan and Jame and and and Mr Barreros did, but you kindof know what I'm rm going with that. So I love it man, just so just to kind ofERECAP, and I totally agree with Oul. Three of these, you know give respectwhere respect is do if you have the letury and the honor F, enagbolingsales professional, make sure you're making e easier, not harder. I lovewhat you said about making a contextual contextural. I want to underscore thatunderscore that again underscored again. That's so important! Don't stay up here,don't stay high level, make it as contextual it's humanly possible. Ithink that goes a long way and in earning people's respect that you, okay,you really understand my role and what I have to do every day that hugeculture. I love that the holistic checkins. That's one cool thing aboutabout covid. I don't know about you, but a lot of my zooms now genuinelystart with the. How are you and people actually care about the response yusedto stick? How are you as a throwaway question? Now it's a a genuine onewhere people are are interested in the answer and then last Butot at leastremember who your customerer is and take the time to Care Pau. I love itman we will wrap up there. Thank you so much for all the insights. Yourwealthand knowledge keep growing. This thing amazing to see talents of successin the success that the sales team has had and this academy you built so KudosMan and D. Thank you so much for Ou time awesome. Thank you for having me look forward to our futureconversations, absolutely men and to all the listeners. Thank you so muchfraggin out with us we'll see next time. This was another episode of the salesengagement, podcast join us at sales, engagementcom for new episodes,resources and the book on sales.

Engagement now available on Amazon,Barns and noble or wherever books are sold to get the most out of your salesengagement strategy, make sure to check out outrage. The leading salesengagement platform to you on the next episode.

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