The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

Building Yourself Into a Successful Morning Person w/ Tom Alaimo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Not a lot of us are excited when the 5:00 AM alarm goes off.

But we could train ourselves to be.

Recently on Sales Engagement, I was able to chat with Tom Alaimo, Growth Account Executive at Gong, about setting yourself up for success with a killer morning routine.

What we talked about:

  • How Tom achieved sales rep of the year in North America with self-discipline
  • Tom’s morning rituals
  • The importance of completing the top two priorities by noon
  • How to get started waking up early

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Sales Engagementin your favorite podcast player.
 

Welcome to the sales engagement a podcast. This podcast is brought to you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, and they just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach.Well does outreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead inrecord time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also seehow outreach ones account based, plays, manages reps and so much more usingtheir own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processesand customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it asgood as they do. Had to outreach Doo on outreach to see what theyhave going on. Now let's get into today's episode. Hello and welcome backeveryone to the sales engagement podcast. You hanging out with stuff, Parker,and this is going to be a fun one. I am joined by TomAlamo. Tom, welcome, brother, Hey, I appreciate you have meon, Scott. Let's do this thing. This is going to be fun.And so, finally, enough, Tom and I just recorded another podcast. Tom Actually has a podcast of his own and we just did an episodetogether. So we're doing backtoback, really getting to know each other here.It's fun to be the interviewer now. But Tom so, you've recently justjoined Gom. That's really cool, fast growing company. Account executive over atGonge. But for the listeners, before we kind of dive into it,did you give the Quick Superhero origin story? Tom Had you get to where you'reat today? Yeah, man, I'm excited to be here and I'malways a little more comfortable being the interviewer, so it was fun to have youon the show. But yeah, I am from Boston originally and Igot my start in sales in college. Came across a Shiny Flyer and agrocery store parking lot which ended up being an opportunity for cut code knives.So if anyone knows that, you're going...

...into people's homes and cutting up fruits, vegetables, pennies, ropes, pretty much anything you get your hands onto try to sell knives. I did particularly well they're that summer was numberseven in New England. Had A great time, made some good money andthat opened my eyes in college to that, you know, sales could be areal job. You know, I didn't even know that that was reallya real opportunity for someone to come out of school. So that opened myeyes to it. I came out of school and went to tech target.Spent five years there in ten data company just outside of Boston. And youknow, for the first six, nine, twelve months coming out of school,as a lot of people do, I was struggling with, you know, partying too much. You know, I'd be going out, you know, Monday for Monday night football. You know, maybe take Tuesday off,and then you got wine Wednesday and Thursday and then the weekend. And youknow, I came across a book thinking grow rich by Napoleon Hill. Idon't know how I got it, I don't know where it came but itis. It absolutely changed my life and just thinking about what I put inis what I could get out of my career, my life. Actually haveit right here. This is not prestaged. I read them every year at theend of the year as kind of a reminder and kind of excite meand work on my goals for the next year. So we're doing this inDecember and I was check taking a look at it today. But Yeah,tech target. I went through the ranks and started to really kind of Hummalong start working with midsize enterprise companies. was named sales rep of the yearand in North America one year and started working with folks like Microsoft and IBMand some of our bigger customers. And you know, on the side,what I've been doing for a lot, about three and a half years,I know that we just did the interview together, is build up a blogin a podcast around first personal development and now it's more focused on sales.And so I've been doing that for about three and a half years, putout hundreds of pieces of content and you know, like you mentioned, Ijust decided to join Gong. Started in January and, you know, excitedto bring on two thousand and twenty one...

...with, you know, new roleand new opportunity and hopefully make it a great year. I love it,man, I love it. Incredible Storing. There's lots. I want to diveinto. Their first first thing that popped in my head. Once youget on boarded with with gone, we're going to have to take the salesengagement podcast and put it through gone and see how many times coco knives hascome up, because I swear it's like every third person in this successful salespersonin tech or in other industries, was trained by by Keto. Originally alot of people selling coco knives. So shout out CUCO for training half thetech industry. Dude, shout out. And you know they have killers.And the thing is that once you get good, you make fifty percent,commission I don't know if people know that. Yeah, don't. You hit acertain dollar amount. So there's people that out there that. I meanthey just do that full time and they're selling hundreds of thousands of dollars worthof knives every year. But there's no better training ground than just going inperson, whether your cold call and knocking on doors. I know that's howyou had your come up as well, and you know a cold call orbig presentation is a lot less scary once you've been doing that and you know, standing in people's homes and cutting up their dinner with them. Yeah,I mean you're totally right. It's just about it's like that. It's justa sheer repetition. You get so many cycles in with so many different stylesof people that you start to be able to make some patterns. I rememberthis is not even I wish I could find this. I probably threw itout in one of my moves. But way back in the day I hadbuilt this like chart. I like twenty seven personality types, and I wasI was positive that there was only like twenty seve because I kept seeing likethe same kind of people show up. A Bi Oh you were like thatlast person and, like I did, would have been that would be someof the best content ever. That would be awesome. But that was builtfrom a nineteen year old brain, so it's probably a very flawed but clearlyit's all right. Yeah, it was...

...great too, because they taught youhow to cold called. They taught we talked about goals. You set goalsevery week. How many demos you want to do, how much you wantto sell? You know, the sales managers were great. It was agreat education for for coming up. So it wasn't just still reps and youknow, there's a lot of good coach in there too. That's awesome.You know, if they're still around, the still think. Oh Yeah,I know people that are in college getting an internship there. I always tellthem that's where they can start. I love that. That's awesome. Allright, I want to hold it on something there. So you use yougot sales wrap at the year. Man, that's that's incredible for North America.That is no easy feet. What do you think that year or whatled to that year? What were you doing differently? How did you becomenumber one out of everyone else? It's a good question. I mean,I think anyone that's been in sales for, you know, a couple of yearsknows that there's a lot of you know, what you get in itor what you get out is just, you know, equal to what youput in, but they're also take some luck to so you know, there'sa lot of things that, you know, I try to do all the timeand sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. But for me, whatI really learned and what I've really focused on early in my career is tryingto focus on what I can control and really focus on the fundamentals of havingthe right attitude, putting in the most effort, treating people well, makinggood choices and so, like I was, I remember and I still am thisway. But once I've read that book and I just started reading,you know, consuming all this. You know Tony Robbins and you know allyou know Dal Carnegie and all this stuff. You know all these people that youknow, I'm sure a lot of the listeners have read as well.I just got really honed in on being super discipline. So I started gettingup at five in the morning and I'd be prospected in the morning and thenI'd, you know, be sending books to prospects and send in coffee mugswith their, you know, university on them and trying to book meetings thatway. And you start getting the podcast...

...and try to use that to booksome meetings as well. And so I felt like my brain was just onfire at that point and I almost feel like back then I didn't know.I didn't even know what I was doing. I didn't know that, you know, like what the limits were. I feel like as we get older, we placed these limits on ourselves and say, Oh, you know,this is what I did last year, so this is about what I shouldbe doing, or this is what the person next to me. At thatstage I was so green. It was probably my second or third year thatI was just like I could sell, you know, a billion dollars worthof this data. You know, there's no limit. So I really wentfor it and you know, I've spent a lot of time visualizing it,I would meditate on it, I'd write down my goals every single morning.So it was really like an obsession that I knew that I really wanted toget good at sales and I wanted to make money and I want to besuccessful, and there's just some years where I feel like there's distractions that comeup, maybe you don't do things the way you would have liked or youget an unlucky break here and there, but I felt like I was justso totally focused and obsessed with trying to sell and trying to be successful atthe company that I put all my eggs in that basket and, you know, worked out well. I mean that's what it takes. You know,it's crazy to hear that, and that's like it's a repeatable formula, likethe the roadmap to success has already been figured out. You know. Youyou get up early, you take care of your body, you take careof your mind, you put in the hours and it's if you're giving anopportunity. Of course there's a whole other slew of issues that we won't getinto, but if you're giving an opportunity, that's really the road map, man, and you you did it. Do still get up at a fivean yeah, for the most part it's yeah, five or thirty and yeah, I like that's the one discipline, that's the one habit that I feellike has really made a big impact on me because I'm a morning person andit's just it's just feels good to start...

...the day when you know other peopleare sleeping and you can get some things done, and I try to getas many top priorities done by noon as I can, so then the afternoonis gravy. You know, that's that's the goal on most days. Soyeah, that's that's a habit up stuck with. That's awesome, man.It's something I kind of I kind of bounce back and forth with. I'llget, I get. I'm very like I find them like cyclical. Youknow, do you ever? You know, you know, you see like learna lesson or figure out a routine and then somewhere at it just goesaway and you're like well, yeah, that happened and then you have torelearn it. So I love that. You said you you re were readNapoleon Hill every year. I read seven habits of highly effective people every yearbecause as as humans were were very forgetful. You know, we can learn lessons, but then we have to always relearn them just as much. That'scool, man. So I guess my next question is let's let's dive intoNapoleon Hail. So you're you're a big fan. I'm not a big Fanas well, many are. What's stuck out to you? You know,it had a profound impact on your career. What we're sort of the the lightbulbmoments, other than, you know, what you mentioned, which was someserious discipline. Yeah, I mean I think from a you know,kind of Meta, full philosophical perspective, it was the thought of like agrowth mindset, right. It's the thought that, you know, I wassomeone in school that got be be pluses. You know, I wasn't I wasn'tfailing out, I wasn't getting straight as in sports, I was prettygood, you know, as a deto athlete. You know, I'm nota big guy. I did pretty well at sports, but was never theStud I was never, you know, breaking records or anything like that,and so I was kind of thought that that's just me, and that bookreally illuminated all of these different examples and all of the reasons why you canactually go from wherever you are right now and continue to get better and ifyou continue to focus on constant improvement,...

...you can make things happen. Solike they start out. The book starts out with a story of this guy, Edwin Barnes, and he's just got it in his mind that he wantsto work with Thomas Edison. This is a really old story, and sohe hops on some freight train and he goes down to New Jersey and hepresents himself and says hey, now I want to work with you, andEdison kind of blows him off and then, you know, over time he tellsa story of how he, his sheer persistence and will and desire,not only earned him the job, but then he actually changed Edison's whole businessand became his top salesman for whatever product it was. I think it wasthe edit phone, they called it. And you know, it's just itjust really resumeated with me of like Oh, I can be tenacious, I canbe persistent, I can work harder than people, I can pursue things, you know, with more passion. If I do so, it's goingto put me in a really good spot. I'm not not to say I'm goingto be the next Bill Gates or whoever. That's not, you know, what I'm trying to do, but I know that I can be successfulif I put in the hours and I put in the time and it wasthe first, you know, lesson that. I that that really resonated with me. Yeah, I like that. My question is, this will bea really like practical one, is when you feel these self limiting beliefs comingat you, which we all have them. Everyone has them. I have them, you know, every day, when you feel so self limiting beliefsand you kind of identify it, what is your strategy for for getting overthat? Do you need time to meditate on it, or you take awalk, or how do you get out of that sort of almost fun becauseit's like just your brain kind of lying to you. How do you getout of that, because it can be hard to snap out of that loopand some people spend their whole lives that. Yeah, I mean it's a goodpoint because no matter who you look at, everyone has those thoughts.The most successful, rich people, wealthy or famous, whoever, they allhave those self limiting beliefs. So with...

...me, you know, I wasthinking about this actually this morning. Funny enough, you know that there's kindof that that theory that, say you're going to buy a car, right, and you're going to buy a say it, you know, priest orsomething, and then all of a sudden you just start seeing all these priestsall over the road and you didn't really notice them before. And so Ithink it's called red car theory or something. Maybe I'm making that up, butit's just something like that. There's a fancier name but I can't rememberit right now. But yeah, so it's called the red car theory.For example, trade. I think, yeah, I'll take royalties on that. So you, I think that's very true, for your for the thoughtsand beliefs that you have right. So, like I take time, especially whenI'm, you know, in a good in a good mode, towrite down every morning, like what are the goals, what are the beliefsthat I have? What are the affirmations that I have? So, ifmy goal is to be the sales rep of the year, and all rightout, I am the sales the sales rep of the year at Xyz Companyin two thousand and twenty one, and I'll write that down every morning andthen I might write down a few things of like who I'll have to beto become. That's like, you know, I'm honest, I'm hard working.Now I have integrity, empathetic. You know, I work really hard. You have positive attitude, so on and so forth. So I feellike if I'm spending time writing that, I'm talking to myself about that,I'm consuming things that reinforce that, you know, positive speakers or books orthings like that. It's not going to block out all limiting beliefs, butit's enough positivity around me that I feel like I can get myself back inthat state of confidence, because without that, if you ever try to sell somethingwhen you're in a funk or not confident or don't believe in yourself ordon't believe in what you're selling, it just doesn't work. So that's whatI have to do is almost to a really, you know, kind oflike obsessive degree key positivity and keep, you know, those thoughts around meso that I can keep myself going when I feel down or don't feel motivated. I love that. What's your because you've mentioned a few things now,you know, working out affirmations. What's...

...your morning routine? Do you get? So you get up early? You GET A PRIV thirty? Do youstart working right away? What sets the tone for the day? Because itsounds like your mornings are really important. Yeah, that's a good question.So yeah, wake up, say five or five thirty. I try toget let's say, you can take a step back. The morning I alwaysfeel like starts the night before. So I yeah, things to be setup, you know, like I want whatever I'm going to wear, Igot it picked out, like what I'm having for breakfast. I know whatit is my schedule and like what I'm going to do, I know it. I know who I'm calling, for example, or what I'm going todo in the morning, so I don't have to waste energy thinking about thatstuff. But I'll get up, you know, have a glass of water, I'll meditate for ten minutes, I'll do a little bit of journaling whileI make my coffee and then I think, similar to you, I kind ofgo back and forth. I've done like the early morning workout. Rightnow more of an afternoon workout guy, and I try to focus on gettingwhatever my top two priorities are for the day done before noon and so insome examples that might be shit, I'm way behind on my prospecting or Igot to put a twohour prospecting chunk. I'm and make sure I get thatdone. It could be I got to write a blog or, you know, prepare for this podcast or do a presentation, you know at deck somethinglike that. So I try to get whatever those two things done that Iknow I'm going to be proud about at the end of the day. Iwant to get them done definitely before noon. I might even get them done before, you know, nine or ten, depending on how big or how muchfor a lift they are. And then, you know, after thatkind of get into the normal sales stuff that you have to do of emailsand proposals and things like that. But I try not to check my phoneor my email for the first like hour or two there, because no one'sreally no one needs me at six am or or seven am. So I'vealways felt like that was like a way to kind of get me anxious orto get me to, you know, focus on something else that I'm notsupposed to do. So on my best...

...mornings, yeah, those first liketwo or three hours are focused on me. You know, I'm writing those thingsdown like in my journal, and then I'm just getting after into likemy first one or two priorities for the day. Yeah, yeah, again, great stuff, I know. I think it's Bill Gates has that strategywhere he's like a right out here to do list for the day and thencircle the top three and leave everything else and just focus on those, thosethree things that, like you said, are going to make you feel accomplished, that are going to move the needle, and everything else is just it's justgravy. All right. So you've built this because that's a that's agreat routine and one that many aspire to do, have best intentions to doand often fall fall short. And that's okay. You don't have to beperfect, you know, seven days a week, we're all human. Howdid you because I'm we talked about this on the last podcast. This ideaof compound interest, and compound interest can be built up with with anything,with with relationships, with money, with discipline, and that's what I thinkis happened with you, right, you've basically like slowly started integrating discipline intoyour life and now it's so ingrained in your life. You have all thiscompound interest of discipline that it's it's become way easier over time. For thosepeople listening, I know that's the right thing to do. I would loveto do that. Maybe doesn't have three, five, maybe it's six, seven, whatever year your time is, but get that chunk of morning foryourself before the world wakes up. If you can transport back to when youwere first trying this, and I'm sure tried and pay a little, triedfailed a little. Yeah, what would your advice be to those people thatwould like to integrate something like this into their their mornings? Yeah, well, if you're anything like me, you're probably ambitious and like to make majorshifts and put too much on your plate at once, because that's I feellike that's kind of my trend. It's like there's not enough of my plate, let's dump everything on and then get...

...overwhelmed and then remove everything and justkind of go through that cycle. So it's easy, when I want topick up a new habit, to want to go all in at the beginning, where I actually feel like, you know, a smarter approach, andI wish I was better at this, is to take more incremental chunks.So let's just say you want to build a habit of getting up early,will stick with that. And let's say right now you're waking up at sevenand you want to get closer to five. That's a pretty big difference, twohours. You know, if you take a twohour time zone difference traveling, you might be jet lagged for a day or two righte so, likethat's a pretty substantial shift. So I would just say maybe you start withfifteen, twenty minutes right, like try getting up at forty five this weekand then next week thirty and then, you know, so on and soforth, and then, you know what, two months you're up at five everyday and you did it gradually and you've let your body adjust to that. I think it's easy to you know, the first maybe day or two youwake up, you make that drastic change and the first day you reallyfired up about it, and then by day two or three you're like,Oh man, I'm exhausted, you know, because you're still going to sleep atyour normal time. Your body's not adjusted. Maybe don't know what todo with those extra two hours, and then you just quit it all together. So I feel like it's taken that gradual approach, and I think thatsticks with anything. I think that's if you're trying to eat healthier, ifyou're trying to prospect more, if you're trying to read more, anything thatyou do too generally better yourself. I feel like it's better to take itas small chunks and kind of play the long game. Yeah, couldn't agreemore. And what you said a bout too much on your plate, Ican certainly. Yeah, I relate to that and in many ways, andI think a lot of our generation does, this, has this idea of wantedto like kind of boiled the ocean right away as soon as an idea, this instant gratification generation of like Oh, that's a good idea, let's dothat now, and then, as you kind of grow up and youmature, you realize you can't do it all. Do you have any strategiesfor what you do put on your plate,...

...what you say yes to and andwhat you say no to? Is it's something I'm kind of wrestling withright now, is is this idea that in order to be the most effective, you have to say no to some things. Do you have any sortof framework that you use to be like, okay, I played his hole,can't do anymore, or when you put more on. Yeah, Iwould say this is probably one of the things I struggle with the most.So we'll take any advice I give with a grain of salt. But Ido love I love the concept that's from Derek Sivers called Hell, yes orno. So essentially, if it's not a hell yes, it's a no. Right. So any of those that you're like yeah, that sounds prettygood, you knock that off right like any if it's a one to tenscale, anything below probably like an eight, is not a hell yes, thenthat's not worth your time. And I guess the caveat I would maketo that is like if you're first starting your career and you're just like it'syour first year in sales and your first year networking with people, you mightwant to maybe lower that bar and just tried different things and experiment. Butif you feel strapped and you feel like you know you're having a hard timeprioritizing either things in your work or your personal life or whatever, I thinkthat's just a great foundation of it's either hell, it's not a hell,yes it's a No. That's a good one. That's gonna stick with me. It's it's a sinct. It's easy to remember. I feel like mynext decision I'm going to have, it's gonna that's gonna pop up. Sothank you for sharing that. WHO's a quote? Is that? So it'sDerek Sivers. I know you're a Nov all guy and he's. Yeah,he's one of those maybe in a similar sense in of all, like oneof those people that comes on the Tim Ferris podcast that you've never heard ofbut just drops gems. He was one of the first few guests, Ithink. So He's been on once or twice that. He just drops greatstuff and has his own blog and a few books, so I would highlyrecommend it. Cool check it out. All Right, man, final questionand then we'll go into some kind of...

...takeaways that you want to really leavethe listeners, and there's been a lot of good nuggets in here. Soyou're just about to start a new role and I think many people, particularlythis year there was a ton of layoffs in two thousand and twenty, alot of people starting fresh in two thousand and twenty one probably taking on anew role as well. So many listeners in a similar situation. How doyou approach a new role like? What are you going to get in thereand and do? It's a good question. I think the advice that's been givento me is you know when starting a new role is, for thefirst whatever period of time, maybe it's a month or two months. Youwant to be a sponge, right and you want to have confidence in whateveryou've done in your past that you're going to be able to replicate that andthat's why they hired you, because they think that you can add value andsales or roll or marketing or whatever it is that your job is. Butyou don't want to be the person that comes in and thinks they know everythingright and wants to do everything your way and is kind of calling people loudand making people feel less than and being this polarizing figure. I think somethingthat I wish I learned a little earlier in my career was the internal saleright of building relationships at your company because your other years they might be asales director. Some day you know the person in finance or marketing or contractsor procurement. They're going to help you with all of your deals, right, and all these different departments actually work together and help sales and you helpthem as well, and so I think the key to is really trying tobuild relationships and really trying to be a sponge, trying to understand what works, what doesn't and where can I add my flare, my creativity to causesome positive outcomes. So I think for me it's trying to be patient,hold holding back on that learning and then, when the time has come, startmaking things happen. Yeah, incredible advice and one I also wish thatI was better at earlier, earlier in...

...my career, is basically just yourshut out for the first month and just listen, like just yeah, justlisten, listen, listen, listen, listen. Go and try and huntdown those those top performers, buy them coffees, by them, lunch,whatever you got to do to take some of their time, because all theanswers are are in their head and it's your job just to try and extractas as much. So I think that's a great approach and I know you'llget in there and absolutely smash it's excited to have you on maybe a yearfrom now and we'll do a check in to see at the top of aleader board over at at Gom. All right, man. So this lastquestion I always ask people have a lot going on and someone could be listeningto this while they're are cooking dinner, working out, distracted by emails ontheir phone. If people just remember three things from this conversation, or justthree things you think are super important to highlight and and that are important toyou, what would you like those three things to be? Yeah, Ithink first and foremost, it's been just drilled into me from years, frommy past boss and something I believe a lot, is you control your attitudein your effort right, you control you. So they're going to hang up onyou, people might be rude, the BARRIFSA my port, too muchalmond milk in your Latte, a lot of things that are going to happenin a given day that are outside of your control. But you can controlhow hard you work, you can control your attitude, you can control thedecisions you make, the choices, how you treat others, and so ifyou can control those things over the long run, you're going to be successful, period and of story. So I think that's the first thing you know. The second thing I would say is a mentor of mine, Ralph Barcie, who's over at tray now. Maybe the advice years ago before I startedthe blog and podcast, that in order to become valuable you need to addvalue to others. Right. So that's...

...why I started the blog in podcastwas literally because of that one quote that I heard him say and I said, Oh, I want to be valuable, so let me just try to addvalue. So that could be that you create content, that could bethat you know how you handle yourself in a sales conversation. It could bethat you're just prepared and you have a genda ready and you know you're takingnotes on any internal meeting that you have. It's just doing those little things thatcan help make people's lives easier and help try to, you know,make their job better or easier or, you know, add dit them beforeyou ask for the sale or ask for advice or has them to be yourmentor whatever it might be. And then the third thing is, you know, surround yourself with great people. So that could mean joining a great company, that could mean surrounding yourself with great friends or significant other or family orwhomever is inspiring and uplifting to you. But I think it also you know, there's a lot of talk about mentors, and I put a really highpasis alsoon virtual mentors. Right, like who's in your instagram feed? Whoare you reading? Who's podcasts are you listening to? You who are you, you know, interacting with on Linkedin or twitter or read it or youknow whatever community that you're a part of? Right, because you could say thatyou want to get better at things and then you spend an hour anda half on instagram with things that kind of make you feel sad or lessthan or that are just kind of silly. Right. But if you're continuing touse all these great resources, all this great content to help make youbetter and more inspired and and have more skills than skies the limit. Sothose are the three for you. Credible advice. Credible advice. Go backthirty seconds, maybe one minute, read lesson to that. That was.That's the the secrets to a a successful career, on a successful life.Tom I'm sure people listening to this would love to hear more of what youhave to say. You have a great outlook on on life. Where canthey do so? Of course you have...

...your awesome podcast. At where elsecan people connect? Yep, yeah, so the podcast is called millennial sale, so it's on apple, spotify, wherever you listen. You can addme. Tom My last name is Alaimo, on Linkedin. O respawn to prettymuch every message. That again, unless it's just a cold spam salespitch, and then you can find me on twitter and Instagram at Tommy Tahoe, and I love to connect with people. Sit Me up and let's start aconversation. Amazing, Tom Thank you so much for the time and theinsight. This has been a ton of fun and good luck in that thenew role and from those listeners will see an next episode. Appreciate it,Scott. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. To help thisget in front of more eyes and ears, please leave us a shining five starreview. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in thebook on sales engagement to get the most out of your sales engagement strategy.Make sure to check out outreach that I oh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

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