The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Modern Sales Technology: An Analyst’s View

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What are the qualities of revenue innovators? And are you one?

Revenue innovators are a new class of leaders who prioritize the most innovative sales technologies and make business decisions based on data rather than intuition. They can be any member of a revenue team who thinks strategically about applying technology in innovative ways.

In this episode, Mark Kosoglow , VP of Sales at Outreach, interviews Dr. Mary Shea, Global Innovation Evangelist at Outreach , about her most recent publication focusing on innovation in modern sales technology.

Join us as we discuss:

  • Mary’s evolution as an analyst (and her latest projects)
  • A 15-point evaluation of the modern sales or revenue leader
  • How revenue innovators apply technology
  • Creating a culture or environment that supports innovation

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts , on Spotify , or on our website .

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Sales Engagement

in your favorite podcast player.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, and they just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach well does outreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead in record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see how outreach runs account based plays, manages reps and so much more using their own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as they do. Had to outreach Doo on outreach to see what they have going on. Now let's get into today's episode. Hey everyone, it's Mark Costaglo. I'm the head of sales at outreach. It's been a long time since I've been on the sales engagement podcast, but they pulled me out of retirement for momentous occasion. I have with me Mary Sha. Mary Sha, why don't you introduce yourself, requily? Hey Mark, hi everyone, is great to be here. My name is Mary, or Mary Shay, and one syllable, as people like to say. I'm a global innovation evangelist here at outreach and so happy to be a guest on your show. Mark. Yes, so it was funny our cro and a bear came to me. He's like, mark, I have this crazy idea. I want to hire the analyst that did our forster way, the analyst that has kind of been at the forefront of what modern sales technology in the modern sales text that is. She's helped to find that for the industry. She went out and she did it. Mary came aboard and I've been so excited ever since to hear how Mary talks about it. Mary, you've just created a point of view on our category, on our industry. Why don't you tell everybody a little bit about that? Yeah, so, thanks so much, Mark. And it's been six months that I've been at outreach, but naturally I've been falling the company for many, many years as an analyst on the outside at Forest r and really I spent the last six months talking to executives across the business, many, many different folks across the business to understand how they're thinking about the category. I continue to speak with my analyst friends, customers of outreach and others that I've valued their opinion in the marketplace and I started to pull together my thoughts for where I think our category is going. As probably most of your listeners know, there's massive convergence that's happening in the sales technology marketplace and this piece of research really builds on to the sales tech tied that I was the leader author on in early two thousand and twenty one, where we looked at all of the, I guess primarily the fifteen major sales tech categories and to find them and talked about where we saw things going collectively with my forester colleagues, and then as I came to outreach and really started to learn more about the company from the inside out, so to speak. This is really my view of what's going on the marketplace, where ...

...outreach is going and how this new class of leaders that I'm calling revenue innovators is emerging in the midst of all of this chaos as we hope to ramp off of the pandemic but find ourselves in another phase of it. Yeah, well, Mary, you know, I think you could have done something like this at forster, but you did it at outreach. What about your situation now helps you do this even better and provide like a deeper insight than you would have been able to in the past. Yeah, it's interesting. I mean an analystet forester is one of the best jobs in the world, but you know, after doing that for six years, I was ready to tackle on and a new challenge and I think the you know, the amount of intellectual freedom and space that Anna in and manny, our CEO, have given me and provided me in the platform that the company has provided to me is almost bigger and broader than what I had at forester, and so I have less pressure of those day to day hour to our deadlines and transactional interactions that I used to have with clients and more time to conduct research and think more deeply about some of these topics without the constraints of a lot of different things that I had to do day to day as an analyst, and so it was great. I took several months to really work on this and I think the time and the conversations that I had with people in the ability to really just envision what this future is going to look like for us. Voted really well for the paper and I'm really proud of what we've come up with. So you know, when we spend time thinking about something for a long time and then we are forced to write it out, there's something magical that happens, like we get a revelation, we there's an Aha moment that we just never would have gotten without that process. Like what's your biggest Aha moment? This a most surprising thing that you walked away from in that process? Yeah, I mean, I think, I mean this isn't necessarily extraordinarily surprising, but it was something that I found to be really motivating and positive. And as I thought about all of the challenges that individuals have, that companies have and globally that we're having as a result of everything that's going on, I found that simultaneously with those challenges, there's this juxtaposition of innovation that's happening that is more exciting than anything that I've seen in my lifetime. You know, whether that's the maturation of machine learning and an AI to really start to provide business leaders like yourself with lots of different options for decisionmaking, whether it's the automation that's taking sales people out of, you know, the data entry game, or I just read this the other day, there's this new vehicle that's designed to fly by over the water from Boston to I think it's New York or Washington, and it hovers right over the water. It is completely sustainable...

...from an energy standpoint, it's faster than the Ascella and there's no traffic. And so, you know, when you think about everything that's happening and all the challenges that we have, from climate change to social unrest, to labor shortage, to inflation too. I didn't check the stock market today, but I know yesterday it was a bad day. But then there's just so much that's happening that's incredibly exciting. So that's the part that I'm taking away from all of this is that, yes, we have challenges, but we have tremendous, tremendous opportunities ahead of ourselves. Yeah, that's one of the beautiful things about outreach is our culture is very positive, it's very hopeful. It's like looking for the best and things, and that's how we do uncover these different pockets of innovation. And I think, though, very innovation requires processing, it requires understanding to really become impactful. As you talk to all these business leaders in all these years that you've been at forester and it outreaching even previously. How are the best processors thinking about this innovation? Like? What is like the thought that is getting going to get them ahead of people that aren't thinking that way? Yeah, that's such a good question and it kind of reminds me of the the conversation I had with Guy Ros and we invited guy to speak with some of our clients and I was fortunate enough to be part of that conversation. He was talking about innovation and spinning his brand and podcast out of NPR back in the day and the type of innovation that it takes to build companies and what entrepreneurs need. You know, I I think it's there needs to be an atmosphere where innovation can thrive. Right mark, and I start to when I think about outreach. I'd I go back to some of the cultural dynamics that I think are so wonderful, where you have people like Manny and Anna who are are taking vacations, who are telling people are about their vacations, who are encouraging people to take their days off, where we have the refresh days and right now here I'm on the tip of Cape Cod in great white shark territory, as you know, and I'm doing a workcation and I'm working, you know, as hard as I ever do, but I'm taking a ten mile bike ride every day in the sand dunes, and so being at a place where there's an encouragement for your physical, mental intellectual health, I think is the first start to creating a really innovative environment. And then, of course there needs to be processes and in collaboration and guard rails and things of that nature that will help accelerate. But I think having the culture that we have it outreaches is a really wonderful start and I'm feeling actually more creative professionally than I have in my entire life. Yeah, there's something that happens when you're in the right environment that certain synapsies in the brain that have been dormant wake up and they start firing and you start having these unbelievable thoughts when you're looking at like these different areas. I think...

...the sales to had had fifteen areas of sales technologies at right exactly. Yep, yeah, is you're looking across those. What is the like? That's a lot for a sales or revenue leader to think about. Fifteen different areas where are going to apply technology. Like it sounds like a sounds like a mess, like poward. Where are you guiding people to think about those fifteen areas and how they work together? Yeah, and so those fifteen areas were just fifteen areas that we chose to focus on. If you look at the overall sales text act, you're going to see hundreds or even thousands of points solutions out there. So it's extraordinarily confusing for business leaders to make sense of all of this. And you know, some of the biggest trends that we uncovered that I think are continuing to move pretty quickly is the consolidation and the movement away from this smashup of point solutions. I think it made a ton of sense back in, you know, two thousand and fifteen, two thousand and sixteen, when the innovation on the sales text I was really just starting to bubble up. But now we've got some more mature companies, we've got a number of UNICORNS out there, we've got companies that are reaching tremendous milestones, that technology is maturing and at the end of the day, sells technology. Buyers, tell me, tell us. You know, we don't want to have a hundred different APPS. We want to make a bet on, you know, a couple of different providers that have this vision for the future and that are going to work with us and continue to innovate from a product perspective to create a platform where every member of the revenue team can get value, can work effectively, that have workflows that match how how they go to market on a daily basis and, ultimately, that can extract all of that rich data back up into the platform in the system so that we can provide continuous insights. So I think we are moving away from more to less and companies really kind of picking and choosing those, those platform providers. And naturally, I think that outreaches really leading the charge, at least in the engagement intelligence space, and I think that you've coined a term that would like you to introduce on this podcast. You have a podcast about it and I'd like you to define what that term means. Do you know why it's so important in the in, you know, sales and revenue? Okay, what term are we talking about? It's it is it in but door number one, door number two or door number three? I think you're you've coined. I've never heard someone say revenue innovators before. I heard you say it and I think that when you coin that term you have some definition behind it. You're creating podcasts in a content around it, you try to do spur people onto something. So help me, help us understand that. Yeah, so I came up with a term, revenue innovators, and actually it was part of a pretty collaborative process with a number of different folks internally, as we talk through a bunch of these different ideas, and so this concept of innovation just...

...kept rising to the top of my mind and we really started to think about this new term, which is revenue innovators. And I really call this a new cohort or a new class of leaders that put spires at the center of their strategies, that arms themselves and their sellers with the most innovative sales technologies, that over index is on data rather than intuition to inform their business decisions. And so, you know, I know you and I talk a lot about data and the role that data plays in your first line and second line sales managers lives, but these are the kinds of things that I was thinking about. How much the role of a sales leader, revenue new leader, has really changed back from the day that that that I was one to today, where you really need different attributes and different skills. And my conversations with you, mark, and also with Anna and a number of other folks actually spurred a lot of this creativity around what I think this new revenue innovator looks like. And you know, you can be a revenue innovator who is the top sales officer at the company, you can be a manager, you can be a rep, and I've gone down to really define six core features or attributes that each of these leaders, managers and reps need to have in order to be successful in this modern and modern selling and by buying environment that we find ourselves in. Yeah, I think that's one of the concepts that I love most about revenue innovators was it's not just a sales leader, it's not just the cro that can innovate. The REP can innovate all the way down to their their level. Like what what are you thinking of as some of the advantages that revenue innovators have over people that are kind of stuck in the old way? Yeah, I mean I think the the the reality is the world is shifting and it has been shifting for a while, mark before the pandemic hit, and then when the pandemic hit, it really hastened a lot of the trends that we saw around digital transformation, digital sales transformation, and so you know, you have to move with with the world and I'd spend a lot of time speaking at sales kickoffs and talking to sales leaders that have been in their roles for many, many years and reps and people who don't want to change. To do want to change in the reality is, if you want to be relevant and instrumental and impactful in this business world, you're going to have to evolve and refine your skills to make sense for how buyers want to buy. And buyers have been trained by their experiences and in or interacting with their favorite market places, Amazon and others, right so you know, instantaneous access to information, personalize advertisements, pricing, transparency, what have you, and so they're expecting that in the business world and I really think sales leaders, managers and reps need to take a hard look at their skill set and continue to evolve and develop so that they can be highly successful,...

...not only today, but five and ten years from today, if that's what they choose to do. Well, we're going to have you read the paper at the end of this podcast before somebody listens to that. What is something that you want them to walk away with after listening to you read this this pov? Yeah, I really want them to be inspired. I mean, we are at the center of some amazing activity as business models, selling strategies and methods, and everything is changing, and so I would like anyone who reads this paper to be inspired and to try to learn one new thing a day, do something differently, to experiment, to challenge themselves to be the best they possibly can be in the role that they have. I love that, and so we'll have you read the paper in a second. Here I just want to wind up by asking you this is this is kind of your first thing that you've done. I know because we talk all the time. You got some other stuff come in that's really excited, that you're really excited about. Why don't you pread you just a little bit about some of the stuff that you have come in after this pe? Yeah, yeah, thanks mark. So I got a couple of blogs that are coming up. One is a titled Reflections of a Reluctant Road Warrior. So I crowdsourced a bunch of information from all of my favorite road warriors out there, as well as my own experience in going back and forth to Seattle from Portland Maine over the last several months, and provide some advice and guidance for folks who are getting back out to business travel. So that should be fun. We've got a couple of other things that are in the works and I've just gotten back some amazing data that we partnered with forester or on that really looks at what are be tob sales leaders across North America and the UK thinking about worried about? How do they feel about their own skill sets, their manager skill sets and their reps? What kind of technologies are they relying on? Where do they feel gaps and what's impacting their go to market strategy? So I'm right now. I'm analyzing that data and I'll be publishing a lot of stuff based on that data and also just got some positive feedback from Harvard Business Review that they're interested in a piece from from US mark. So I can't make any promises, but we're hopefully we'll have a nice published piece and Hbr, which has been something of a personal professional goal of mine for some time. Awesome. I just want my name in it one time. Please know we got we gotta Coe, we got to do it byline together. Mark, I have an idea for us. Awesome. Well, Mary, people that want to follow you, people that want access to how you're thinking about things, your research, your analysis on research. Like, where can they catch up with you? How can they find that? Yeah, so I'm very visible and available on Linkedin. I'm also use twitter and people can catch me at at my outreach dot io email, and I'm publishing on a regular basis. So I also go to the outreach website to see more of my stuff. Well,...

...thanks, Mary, and listen, I just want to frame this up. Mary spent weeks in her lab thinking about this, using a breadth of conversation that few people in the world get access to. She's uniquely qualified to write a point of view paece on what's happening with revenue and technology in the impact that it's going to have on commerce in general, and so I'd encourage you stick around. Put It on two acts if you like. Got Ten minutes, Mary it's about a twenty minute thirty minute read right all together. It's probably a little bit short. Under twenty, under twenty. So it's a great way to just get your brain moving and to be inspired, as Mary said, to think about what the future is, what innovation you can bring into feel energized about where we're going as an industry. So thanks so much, very shafe for doing that. Thanks for reading that paper. I hope you stick around and listen to it. Everybody will see you next time on the sales engagement podcast. Thanks mark. Thanks everyone. Outreach Mary's engagement and intelligence to transform its category. Point of view. Article written by me Mary Shay and read by Me Mary Shay. Global Innovation Evangelists at outreach. C RM singularity fades as new technologies mature. For almost a decade after sales forces IPO, the sales technology landscape remained largely unchanged, as most companies viewed customer relationship management, or C R M as we call it, as the only critical technology solution for the sales organization. But crm was never designed for sellers. In its earliest iteration, C RM was intended to help companies accelerate invoicing. Then it was utilized to manage data day seller activity, and eventually it became a pipeline management and forecasting tool. C RMS user interfaces and workflows were never tuned to house sellers do their jobs and, as such, they never embraced it. Over the years, lack of cellar adoption has caused significant information gaps and data in accuracies and C R M systems, leading to disjointed customer experiences and inability to drive insights and pour a visibility into pipelines and forecasts. Many barriers stand in the way of C R M success. According to Gartner, data quality poses major challenges to improving commercial performance, while forester identifies the top three challenges c RM professionals face as creating a single view of customer data, providing customer insights and managing data quality. In two thousand fifteen, with marketings one to many, digital transformation well hunder way. New sales technologies with a scalable one to one focus began to emerge and to attract investor and analyst attention. Companies with NASCON engagement capabilities, such as towed, APP and yes where, as well as early enablement players like seismic and high spot all...

...raised sizeable rounds of capital. In mid Twenty fifteen, when I joined forester, the sales technology market place was just taking off and some of the world's largest bee to be brands began to digitally transform their selling organizations. Today, hundreds of point solutions make up a fragmented sales technology market place, while leading providers extend capabilities in land multibillion dollar valuations. Although sirium is still an important component of the sales tex stact, sellers now work from other, more relevant layers, such as sales engagement, email and linked in, while sales leaders turn to revenue intelligence and operation solutions to better meet their strategic in execution needs. In a twenty twenty survey of sales technology buyers, sixty eight percent said the value they perceived from their sales engagement solutions was high or very high. While Siri M has been a necessary system of record for most organizations, it never fully delivered on its promise, as it doesn't enable or enhance critical processes for marketing, sales and post sale person and now, as newer adjacent sales technologies mature and consolidate into Uber Platforms, expect crm to play a lesser or different role in the modern sales technology stack. Challenges abound as businesses face the next normal. As we move into the next phase of the pandemic, life as we know it won't return to the way it was. Global supply chains are stressed, labor shortages are rampant and higher inflation rates are on the horizon. Economic realities, combined with demographic shifts, political unrest and unprecedented technological innovation all point to a near term client that will be both unpredictable and transformative. Business models, sales strategies, buying motions and even the broader sales technology market place are all in flux. Whether it's keeping up with rapidly evolving buyers, leading a multigenerational sales force or becoming more data literate, today's revenue leaders face a myriad of challenges. In a recent forester study, fifty four percent of sales leaders said the uncertain economic environment would most heavily influence their go to market strategies, while thirty eight percent said it was changing byer requirements. While near term challenges abound, revenue leaders must also prepare their organizations for the selling models of the future. Gardner predicts that by twenty twenty five, sixty percent of be to B sales organizations will transform from experience and intuition based selling to data driven selling, merging their sales processes, sales applications, sales data and sales analytics into a single operational practice. And if that's not enough, forty two...

...percent of companies that sell to other businesses now operate with fewer sales personnel than prior to the pandemic. While be to be revenue leaders claim to create buyer centric strategies, is not yet working. The perception gap between sellers and buyers is wide, as sixty five percent of sellers say they always put the buyer first, while only twenty three percent of buyers agree. Changing demographics also impact the buying process. Millennial buyers aren't tasks with just researching suppliers. These digital natives now are key influencers in economic decision makers. In the United States, forty eight percent of millennials say they make be to be purchase decisions. In addition to their proclivity for digital interactions. This cohort values a suppliers corporate culture in position on social issues of the day. Changing Dynamics create new challenges for be to be sellers, managers and leaders. According to foresters twenty twenty one be to be buying study, the number of interactions needed to close a deal went from seventeen and twenty nineteen to twenty seven. In Two thousand and twenty. The two thousand and Nineteen Gardener buyer survey revealed that an average of eleven individual stakeholders are involved in be to be purchases today and that number can occasionally flex up to nearly twenty. To Planning on the complexity of the purchase. With the reduction of airline routs, the efficiency gains from virtual selling and the emergence of hybrid work models, be to be sellers need to refine their digital, virtual and analog interaction skills to succeed in hyper hybrid formats. Sales managers, who have one eno of the toughest jobs in the revenue organizations, must stretch to with fewer ride alongs and post meeting to brief set starbucks. Managers need to increase their data and analytic skills. Managers need to need tools to optimize and scale their coaching practices and, even though many organizations struggle with data quality issues, revenue leaders are now expected to over index on data to inform their decisionmaking. A new cohort of revenue innovators emerges. There's no question the last year and a half has been and continues to be challenging, but the pandemic has hastened, not halted, progress. According to Gartner, sixty nine percent of board of directors accelerated their digital business initiative following the COVID nineteen disruption. It's within this backdrop that a new class of leaders is emerging. We call these transformational leaders, managers and Reps Revenue Innovators. This new cohort puts fires at the center of their strategies, arms themselves and their sellers with the most innovative sales technologies and over indexes on data rather than intuition to inform their business decisions. Revenue INNOVATOR leaders deliver predictable, efficient growth, have finance and data literacy and procure innovative sales technologies for their organizations. The revenue innovator sales...

...manager delivers predictable cross team production, champions their team's career development and mental fitness and Ingest data to inform their coaching and other actions. And the revenue innovator rep is a predictable producer who embraces hybrid methods and leans into collaboration. Revenue Innovators need a platform, not a point solution mashup. Revenue Innovators cannot achieve maximum performance if they use inconsistent processes and leverage a slew of different APPS, each with their own data in user experience, to build pipeline, manage opportunities and closed deals. Today's predominantly millennial sales force wants to be seen, heard and involved. They expect to have access to top tier digital tools and they strive to make data driven decisions. Unfortunately, these modern reps and managers get bogged down by sideload sales up applications that force them to act as their own data and systems integrator to piece together a picture of what's happening in their pipeline, and many of these folks don't view crm as fundamental to helping them do their jobs. As technologically aware chief executives and boards demand more profitable growth. Digital natives make up half of the global workforce and global and social uncertainty prevail. Revenue innovators will rise up and embrace more sophisticated strategies, instead of relying exclusively on quota carrying reps to drive top line growth. They must weave together the right mix of technology investments, talent profiles and enablement programs to cost effectively boost rep productivity. They must hire and retain a sales force that reflects their customers and society at large, and they must be prepared to communicate with empathy, collectively and individually, with staff impacted by the latest pandemic induced challenge, as well as global, social or political issues. Currently, the average Rep spends only twenty three percent of their time on core direct selling activities, according to forester. In the future, maximizing productivity for all types of sellers will differentiate organizations. To engage efficiently and effectively, all members of the revenue team need access to a platform that automates interactions across phone, virtual meanings, email and text across the entire customer life cycle. As time consuming administrative tasks are rooted out and automated, reps will spend their time on higher value activities such as deepening and extending relationships, delivering insights and negotiating in closing deals. Revenue innovator sales managers must evolve their skills to become more data literate and technology savvy. But, according to Gartner, front line and overlay sellers, along with front and second line managers, are rated as having the lowest sales data proficiency,...

...despite their focus on sales data and seller activity. With highbrid work environments the norm. Managers need the ability to coach Reps and digital, virtual and analog settings. They need easy to consume data and analytics to help them quickly understand what activities, messaging and channels drive the best results so they can guide their reps on how to continuously improve their interactions and business outcomes. For revenue innovator leaders to deliver predictable, efficient growth, new sellers must ramp faster. Ten year. Sellers must take on larger territories and both must deliver exceptional buyer experiences. Self directed and digitally activated buyers leave sellers with less time to influence buying decisions. Larger distributed buying committees elongate deal cycles and sellers need different skills to hit their marks in virtual or hybrid meeting formats. Modern buying and selling scenarios require modern solutions. Today, all members of the revenue team need a single platform to manage their unique work clothes, gain actionable insights and navigate an increasingly complex buying process. The outreach, engagements intelligence platform provides all of that. AUTOMATION TAKES CARE OF MUNDANE TASKS, artificial intelligence surfaces options and users apply their own emotional intelligence to shape their market facing interactions. Engagement and intelligence enable predictable, efficient growth. All revenue leaders strive to deliver predictable, efficient revenue growth, but even those with strong quantitative skills struggle if they don't have access to the right data and analytics. Too many sales organizations take a sideload approach to pipeline generation, Opportunity Management and forecasting. Unfortunately, this unintentionally severs the continuous revenue cycle, resulting in incomplete visibility into the pipeline and forces leaders to contend with streams of disparate information, often pulled together manually and reviewed in offline formats. With this approach, as soon as the data is collected, it's out of date. Guesswork using limited data results in forecast and accuracies and an inability to take corrective actions to improve outcomes. Human error and inconsistency as across individuals and teams. Further confound the problem to account for inaccurate data and address the lack of human objectivity throughout the process, revenue leaders have had to over relay their homegrown algorithms and intuitions on top of their models. In in August, two thousand and twenty one commission study conducted by forester on behalf of outreach, almost one third of B tob sales leaders said their forecasts were derived by selecting key deals and adding in quantitative analysis to arrive at their final number. The static and unscientific approach makes an impossible to dynamically and accurately manage the business as well. Directed human intuition is still important. It's now time for all...

...members of the revenue team to approach their roles and daily activities with a more scientific bent. Reps and managers need analytics in easy to consume dashboards that help them assimilate data, identify patterns and take action. Revenue Operations Practitioners need ability to drive, measure and report and results at every level of the organization, and revenue leaders need three hundred and sixty degree visibility to optimize decision making and deliver accurate forecasts. As data driven approaches to managing revenue generating activities and processes, it become the norm be to be. Organizations that lack a centralized engagement and intelligent platform, one that provides data and insights across the entire revenue cycle, including activities, opportunities, accounts and pipelines, will be at a significant competitive disadvantage. The myriad of responsibilities and decisions top revenue officer space on any given day is unting, but with a centralized engagements and intelligence platform, the job is easier. The outreach platform makes revenue innovators more efficient by continuously inspecting the revenue system to show teams what's not working in their processes and to guide them to take actions in real time to fix it. Outreach helps revenue innovators drive growth by instrumenting the revenue cycle and using telemetry to proactively guide teams to maximize growth. Revenue Innovators who use outreach see increased growth and predictability in their business and evolve their forecast process from predicting the future to changing the future by evaluating and executing unrecommended actions. In a climate where uncontrollable external events and ongoing market volatility are the norm rather than the exception. Robust pipeline management, deal optimization and accurate forecasting are more critical than ever. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. To help this get in front of more eyes and ears, please leave us a shining five star review. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement. To get the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure to check out outreach that ioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (334)