The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

How to Prevent a Toxic Work Environment w/ Jason Vargas

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We're talking about healthy work environments with our guest, Jason Vargas, Senior Consultant at Skaled, on today's episode of The Sales Engagement Podcast. Jason shares with us his insights on preventing toxic workplaces while also actively promoting sales engagement. Tune in!

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast,this podcast had brought you my outreach dotaio leading sales of esnalplatform, eping companies, sellers and customer success, angage with fires andcustomers, and the modern sales ero check out sales, an agecom for newepisodes, resources and the book on sales andbugement. Coming soon. Now,let's get into today's episode, Joping Allo, here senior contentmanaging editor at Auriadi, Oh cided, to be the host of the podcast. Today,we've got a great show for you today Got Jason Vargas Sales Development Guru.I worked with thim in the past, he's over it scale right now. He has yearsand years and mears experience, building high performing sales teams,Sol development teams, just a wealth of knowledge he's on the show today totalk about environment and building an environment so that your sales teamscan't succeed and grow, and the word environment little different. Theculture will get into that in case. You are thinking about that already, but Iwanted to toss it ot over to Jason to introduce himself and tell us a littlebit about himself before we get into the meat of the podcast Jason Cools.Good on Joe Whow, are you I'm doing? Well? How are you I good man thanks forhaving me on so yeah? I you know: I've been in a techsales world for quitesome time started at small companies worked at coming called dataize for along time really to help building skile that team from really there's just fourof us onto eighty. We revenue from about three hundred thousand to eightpoint: five million in a pretty short period of time. That was really funbecause we we bootstrapped that whole process, and I definitely learned a lotin that sport perdiod of time working at that company and Hen since then,move on to other companies and then now, like you mentioned, I'm at scaledskellet is a consulting company and we work with a lot of companies starcompanies to help them really become...

...modern and sales organizations right.So looking at overal process from you know how they hire to their salesprocesses, marketing how their technology stack works together, and wereally help and put together really strong program so that they can becomethose modern type sales organizations that we're seeing these days, wherethey can leverage schools properly, like outreach to Bu, make sure thattheir teams are maximizing the important things in activities thatthey should be versus kind of doing these manual uplod tasks in sales force,and things like that. So that's where I spendin a lot of my time these days is,is working with really cool tech companies from ly across the world. Tobe honest, so with all that experience working with different companies,you've obviously seen a lot on how different organizations are run. Sothat's a Nice Segui right into the topic of today', show, building aenvironment that is conducive to creating high performing teans rightyeah. So tell me a little bit about how you define environment and the basicsaround that term. The word environment yeah. You know it s, something thatpeople leaders- I don't know they really think much about it. It kind ofacts it's going to Bern the pripry right of leaders, ining people, and youknow what I mean by environment, not to Kond on conduse, a culture I do thinkculture can be derived from environment. I've worked at a lot of companies andhad different experiences with those companies writ where I've been inpositions where things are not going throughout the company and really theenvironment. For me, the moment I walked into the door of the experience.bewause like it's a seeking ship or the the battle has already been lost. Theycan be an energy drain, experience right, I've been in environments andcompanies where I walk in and literally the first experience I have them islike well like I'm in Sur per surrvival mode, or how do I survive the day withpotential threats or tax from individuals or whatever the case mightbe again? I think culture could be derived that, but to be honest, Ireally look environment and very...

...different way, and I think it really alot of it has to do with like what's the experience of an individual whenthey walk into e a company or even think about the company, a lot of it. Lcan be tied to the leader, specifically whether it's the CEO on down to a salesmanager or any kind of manager, position Thik. If you look at whathappened with Soover, that became a very toxic environment right, we don'tsay it toxic culture, we say toxic environment right, and so I think it'ssomething that you know I started riding about, andI'm glad we're talking about. U, I here today because I think it's somethingthat most companies don't think about t its really truly, in my opinion, is onething that can separate one team from another in terms of performance as aconsultant for scale. We implement a lot of process. A lot of technologychanges. That' UF is amazing right. However, if you have the most amazingprocess, you have all your text: acks, sinkd and working as efficiently as itshould be, and you have ak n, incredibly toxic environment. I don'tcare. The team is just stoppoing to perform as well as a team who maybedoesn't have the EIS proces season place, but the environment is one.That's super collaborative, creative, supportive right and so that's kind ofwhat I mean by environment, and so it sounds to me that environment can notonly encompass the feel and an aspects of the culture, but also the physicalsurroundings, how people interact within the company. So there's a lot offascets to how you're using environment, whose responsibility is it to build astrong environment so that sales team members or really any employe of Hacompany can perform to their potential. In my opinion, I think it's dross theleader and, to be honest, I think they can almost be like these microenvironments right. I think I'V also work with someincredable sales leaderswho they shielded their teams from a lot of the protection naativity frommaybe the higher ups right, but Wer a company overall at really starts up atthe CEO Dounder. Drawing back on my experience, my company, I worked at theleader E, didn't trust, there's no trust. He was bidit a Chady character,and so the environment in the company...

...really was that of no one trusted it.Anyone everyone always watching the back, very secretive as a really weirdenvironment to be or company, be a part of that was the environment, but itstarted with the purse of the top, that's how he operateded and so there'sa lot of the secrecy, and so I think t it all strarts with leadership. It'sfunny Yo mentione that story that ties back to something you said earlierabout walking into a situation and feeling that, like pure survival moderight, I can see how that would happen. If you walk in and these thinkeveryone's whispering behind your back, I'm not going to perform well, no onearound MES can berform. Well, if we're preoccupied with what someone else maybe saying about them, that's a good point to ma. You mentioned some ofthese, but what are some of the big mistakes leaders May, when buildingenvironment I'm sure the first one would be not even thinking of it yeah.But what are some of the major missteps that you have noticed that salesleaders are making when building out a ennvironment for their teams? It's notbeen a thing of like what he mistakes do they make. I think you kind of Neilthat when you said that they don't think about it, no one wel thinks aboutit, anything about it. The fact of someone saying: Okay, I'M gonna,purposely and intentionally design and evironment. Where my teams going to win,I don't think anyone ever does that right to be honest, lit. I have neversat down and said: Okay, I'm going to design this someenvironment, thisspecific way I's, like naturally, derived from the personality or thecharacater of that individual. If you look at someone like Rop Barsity, theenergy that man has the empathy and compassion that he has for his team,that just bleeds through his whole organization right and so thatenvironment's Cang t be very much derived from rough right, and I thinkthere is some things that he does, that creates a givoe environment, butultimately it is a natural function of who the leader is as individual. So youknow what I'm starting to look at is we know these things about ourselves? Ourpersonalities are characteristic. So how do we take these things andactually apply them in a way that then,...

...when we are gone or the leaders gone,it basically transcends the leader right beccause, it's not scalbl. If youtry to build environment, that's just based on your personality right,because the moment you leave and someone comes in, who has a verypowerful personality, but might be a bit of a jerk or more based on fearthan that's going to take over right. So it's ist an interesting conversationto try and start within the sales community. Like is this something rightand that's kind of what I'm more interested in looking at trying to doand have this become a conversesation Whiteh people start thinking about thisriht cae. I think we're starting to see a lot of a lat. But you see us acrossclood organizations where you just have incredible opportunity, but leadershipby the top. They can get so toxic, it bleezs down the rest of the company,and then you have these toxic experiences and environments and thenat some point the company has needs to have some change. Management of somesort or the company fails ultimately and a think is an importantconversation and topic to start having in the sales to community, because itis a very high, pressured environment that we all work inside of right as atech company were expect to Skale and go quickly defficiently and figurethings out in the fly and if you don't have tha supportive environment, thenyou ultimately y Hav burn out, and I can't tell you how many friends that Ihave that are executives. That e have experience burn out. I have experienceburn out. It's not a very good place to be as a leader yeah, and I think youmake a good point there that you know if you're experiencing this burnout D-And you have this tox environment you're not going to be able to foformto the level that is required of you. I think it comes down to preoccupationright. You only have so much band with we say band with all the time, but enlhave so much band with to complete the task in front of you and if a lot ofyour bandwith is used up dealing with this terrible environment, yeah thatyou're in then there's not much left over to actually succeed right yeah. Soyou mentioned kind of building out AF framework or some sort of process thatdoesn't derive directly from a amazing leader's personality or a terriblepleters personality, SOM ithing they...

...can be left behind something that couldbe taught yeah. Where do you think that that first stet is like? What's Yeahyou build out this framework? You know, I think he started looking at a couplefundamental things and for me, a lot of it is, I guess, like a level ofresponsibility or ownership right, if you as a leader, began to take on ahundred percent responsibility and ownership of the results of your teamand then you actually go, and you teach your team to be a hundred percentresponsible, andtake ownership of their results right. So now you have two setsof people that are taking a hundred percent responsibility for theirsuccess in Baylor. I think it's a very powerful place to be right as a leaderlike I'm, going to give fifty percent or under percent or seven five percent,and hopefully my team picks up the the rest of e slack or the reverse. Likethe raps. Like I'm a hundred percent responsible, my managers is there apersent responsible or vice verso? You know that creates a lot more room forpeople to start putting fingers in blame in terms of WHO's responsible forwhat right, so we take a hundred is a responsibility for success in Bailee,ofyeur team. I think that's very powerful place and you train your teamTan do the same. Then you have a pretty cool upper team to build a team thatexcels beyond any other team right, so it's like if they don't have thetraining that that they need then they're responsible for making surethat they go get it kind of mentality. I think that's one thing that sounds kind of like extremeownership right yeah totally right. I think it follows that mindset prettyspot on right. I think it's kind of a good level of integrity that you haveto have an operate inside of, because if you look at your success and ifyou're failing at something right, there's most liky some kind ofMintegrity, that's missing and it's just a different way of looking at itright. So if you look at having a hundred percent integrity andEverythingcan, you do it's really easier to identify where there's nointegrity right. So, for example, if I'm out a shape or there's, I can cry,I fon no tons of things that are out of integrity. I Diet a a lack of exercisesor whatever they might be et right or...

...if I'm missing quota, there's some kindof integorty that's out right. It can be, maybe I'm not being responsible forgetting a help, O need- or maybe there's always going to be somethingright, and so I think just training people how to do that as a manager as aleader is really important, because you don't want to have te Microman. Youwant people who are going to set beyond their cofort zone and be able to pushthemselves because they want to not because you are forcing them to orputting treshture on them right. You want to find those people or explainpeople to be able to start doing that for themselves and if you teach ahundred percent ownership or extreme ownership or responsibility orintegrity, be w whatever you we want to call it. If People Start Operinig at ahigher level that just going to have incredible people that that you'remanaging or is, hopefully they can start stout managing the selves right.So I think that's a very strong, powerful framework that can go a longway because everything else like once you have that based foundation of highintegrity than everything else. I think it's easy right, and so, as you goforward consulting and starting new teams and new businesses, what are someof the things that you were going to do right off the bat to ensure that youare building a solid environment for your team, then know you mentioneintegrity. Well, that's great! It is a little bit of a subjective term for thelisteners today, what are like two or three takeaways that they can go yoallright. Let me audit my environment. Let me see what I'm doing from my teamhere' some things I can do today that are going to improve that one encourage people to make as manymistakes as possible. I think that quits really a healthy environment to Ithink everyone would just really check the ego at the door. So I guess that,in a way that can look like someone asking for constant feeback, askm wharthey can improve and that includesive leader, as well as a leader, I think,HEU, should ask your team. Where am I kind of dropping ball or were my gapsand where you can, you see me improving? I think it leaders who they areproactive about finding out that information, a thing that shows thatthey're just leaving the ego aut the door and they're really interested inproving you making sure that their team...

...has whatever they need. This is my fallhonor more like Ma. HAP people make mistakes, but just just take action interms of nothing has to be perfect instead of a team, and I thinkencouraging people to make mistakes also encourage them to try new things,an people level of ownership so that they can go make mistakes and go trynew things and be alld than what they do. I think gain b those types ofthings ist, really creative, a pretty awesome environment right somthingagain, this is a conversation that I've been thinking a lot of, and so it'sprobably time to start discilling it into like actionable Ta Sek. I sattuing right, a defitey do haveall the answers, butyou know in talking with Steven Brody one thing that he does to ensure thathe hadis a really powerful team in dynamic across this team. As he says itall starts with the hiring process right, it all starts at hiring who youebringing ot the company, but not only who you bring into the company, but forhim it's the the vetting process right because stepen brody comes from aspecial courses, background the military and he said, if you lookacross all special forces organizations, there's one thing in common and that'show h tha basically bet through people right, so the NAVYS stals have theirhell week. The Rangers have foro what he called it. But everyone has thisreally intense program because they're basically coming filtering out throughthe people who really don't want to be there O or er. Just O have the fightingspirit that those teams are looking for and that's one thing that Steven reallyimplements. So if you want to look at something like you can really implementto build a healt environment, FO teams is having a very rigorous bendingprocess when you're hiring to only make sure that you get the best people. Ithink that is probably by far andteway the best takeway right there right. Ifit's easy to get, you know it probably isn't worth it like. If you J just kindof cruising you a position, you're not going to value that position and youmay bring negativity into it. So I think it's what super useful andactional for our listeners, and I know that any job that I have done reallywell and I hope I've done really well at most jobs but athat. I feel I'vedone really well. It was a bitch to get...

...like it was a hard yeah Oryeah, likethe interview. proses was hard and my managers commanded a lot out of me, butwe're also etremely supportive Andreceptive to having a conversationand providing ou feed that can be ceiving. A Fe Tha, so I think that's agreat advice. There Chason, I'm really looking forward to hearing more aboutwhat you're writing on and like how to build this powerphone and supportiveenvironment for sales teams- and I know you're- writing a ton about it rightnow. So, looking forward to seeing that Jason of people have questions or wantto connect with you, how can they do that yeah they can reach out to mailLinington, not too heavy on twitter. These days, my email is a Jason DottBargus at scaled scale to spelt the K so SK Fil, Fretha Beach, O Meaning Thothose to channels won Te haveit answer any questions, thanks again Jason forbeing on the podcast today. Thank you all from listening, and we will see younext time on the sales engagement podcast. This was another episode ofthe Sales Abagement podcast Jonas at sales, engagementcom for new episodes,resources and the book on sales gragement coming to to get the most oudof your sales and gating strategy, make sure to check out out reached ot ioleading sales, an me Fo Plat. So you on the next episode.

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