The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 4 years ago

How Sales Engagement Has Changed in Last 5 Years

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Mark talks with Tito Bohrt, Founder and CEO of AltiSales, about the changing landscape of sales engagement and Tito offers his best tips on landing high-value accounts. 

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast. This podcast is brought to you by outreach dot I oh, the leading sales engagement platform helping companies, sellers and customer success engagement fires and customers in the modern sales era. Check out sales engagementcom for new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement coming soon. Now let's get into today's episode. Hey, welcome to the sales engagement podcast on Mare COSTAGLOVIEPA, sales at outreach, and today we have my long time buddy, my chauffeur to the San Francisco airport, helped me out many times, Tito board, CEO and founder of Alt sales. How you doing, Tito? I am doing excellent. Thanks for having me. Good. Well, Hey, thanks for all the rise to San Francisco airport. I appreciate it. Flash the minute halways always have you to help a buddy out. Yeas, are right man. Well, Hey, when we're getting together the sales engagement podcast, one thing that we were talking about was having people on here that have kind of forward thinking thought, leadership, a little bit controversial, that have an opinion out there, and so immediately I thought of you and I just love to start the conversation just talking about a little bit about you've been doing sales engagement, and especially with SDRs, for a long time. Like tell me a little bit about the genesis, how you got started and how you mature over the first few years. Yeah, definitely. Let me focus. Was a conversation on things are going to be helpful to the GAUDIENCE. So I started about six years ago building a cells development team for share foul, which was a division of Citrix. On doing cells development then was a little bit different. So we were high volume callers, making about a hundred calls up to a hundred fifty calls a day per rep. it was all click to dial, so no autodialers and the reps had no control of her email. So all the email was run by marketing and then all the phone calls were run by what we called lead generation team then, and what were purely focused on how do we make these calls and how do we measure these calls in a way that help us get better every day. Now things have changed a lot because seals devloment not only has control over email, but you can no show touches, you can do other things. Were like looking linkedin profiles, were crafting manually emails. There's a there's many more pieces to it than there was five years ago. So help me understand five years ago, because there's a lot of people that are still in that spot. I mean you're kind of the head at the curve. Like why was email so disjointed from the phone? I mean the concept was that marketing was going to run all the emails because they know how to write emails and then they have the technology, like all these templates through whatever it is, Marquetto bought. That makes the email look very nice and branded. But the problem that we've encountered, and everybody has seen this, is nobody is clicking through those emails...

...anymore. And, more importantly, as soon as we see an email that is all branded, we see it as marketing spam. So so what we're trying to do is actually mimic a onetone sales communication. Right acid, when I send you an email, I don't add any of these like nice design to it, it's just a text, text email, and then that increases response rates. Do you think that email it helps you convert phone calls at a better rate? Do you feel like it's a totally separate channel that converts and needs to be like in its own silo. Like how do you view the how those two work together? Usually interesting thing. I'm going to give you a maybe some tips and tricks here that I wouldn't share otherwise. But man, you're my good buddy and this is your podcast, so how the here's some tricks that you can run right like, for example, nowadays, while you're using sales engagement, if we get directly to a voicemail and we're not connecting life to a person, I don't even ask for a call back. My voice mails are like hey, mark, I was sho on your website looking at how you do X, Y Z, and it seems that you have x many employees for this function. We're working with this other company and thought it'd be relevant to talk to you as well. Can you look at the email it just send you? My name is John Stewart with x company. So I don't start with a name and company, I go directly to making an OB servation via the voice mail and then I don't ask for a callback. I don't even give them my number, like most people have color ID. Yeah, they want to call me back, they can just press call and it will call me back, but I point them to an email and then when they open that email, that email expands on the information that I was talking about and engages them. Right, that's it, that's that's the reason you do shells engagement to engage people into what you want to talk about and it should be beneficial to them. Of course. What made you change from like this super call every hundred hundred fifty dollars a day to like push him towards email, I think is the fact that one plus one doesn't equal to in this case. So our call plus an email yields better result. Stunt, two calls or two emails, right. So the combination of two different channels, it's exponential. Well, that creates is some people are receptive to email, some people are receptive to phone, some people never pick up the phone but listen to voice males. Everybody has a different working dynamic. So if you hit people through different channels, at least you'll be in the awareness own and now they are hearing about your from you from different angles, and it might not even be the right fit or the right moment, but they will call on your website, they'll investigate a little bit further. So you kind of like again engage them, warm them up a little bit, and then who knows, like I just had a somebody open an email, a cold email that we had sent them seven months ago, and we call him up and they're like wow, this is the right time now, like, I'm glad you called me, but you need to start tracking those things, like are you tracking email opens? Are you tracking the lag...

...between when your email was open, and are you tracking how many times those emails were open? Maybe somebody opens your email four times, you want to give them a call. You need to start doing those things. Yeah, do you guys still hammer out a hundred, a hundred, fifty thou a day or you have you substituted in emailing activity instead? So here's the interesting part. In it used to be that when Lee generation or self development started, it was just a one person function. Right. It was like, okay, let's hire some entry level person out of college, put them on the phone and he's going to get US meetings. And in today's world you can still have somebody make a hundred calls a day, but you get an operationalized arrest to excellence. So the way we run it is we have a junior position where there's sole purpose. That role is to find data, phone numbers, emails, personalization techniques. So they might go on somebody's linkedin profile, see that they volunteered for SOS children's village and that they speak French and German, and the email were will not only say, like hey, mark, I see you're the BEPO sales out our each but also say, you know, it might start with like Vongeour mark and because you speak French, and then at the end I will say, like, what age did you decide to learn Italian and French, and like some other questions on might prompt your reaction to understand this, some personalized message and respond. So we have people who only focus on data, we have people who only focus on calls, and you need heads of departments are helping those areas be operational lies to excellence so that your leads can flow from hey, let's select the hundred, two, hundred, five hundred acounts want to go after to finding the right data, putting into the right email templates, sending it into the right person. The person was on the phone making hundred calls a day. Can get better faster. I get much better results. How do you deal with that? So you're the CEO of your company, you can do whatever you want to. Let's say I'm a sales manager working inside a commercial account and I have two hundred sellers like I'm not always going to be able to segment out the roles like that. How do you do if you're just, you know, Joe Schmo Guy and Joe Schmo company? Before you even started my company, I was on account executive working my own deals and I was a full cycle rep, so I had to go find my own accounts and call him up and try to get myself a meeting and so on. All what I did is I quickly identify target accounts that I wanted to go after. So I found that the real estate market, apartment management company was was going to be my area of focus. I found a few different data sources that would give me the information I needed. The Apartment Management Association, Wikipedia was another one. There was, I think, Zillo, and I found a few different areas where a good source data from. I want on up work and I started hiring people in Philippines and in India and in Pakistan for four or five six dollars an hour that I would follow a research process that will give me the date I needed for me to be able to make the phone calls. And at that point I was running everything through excel. I would just like call ourselves different callers and just call up and then called the next person, next person, next person, next person and so on. But today it's gone much easier, like there's tools can enable you to orchestrate your whole...

...team to be able to do that at scale. It's super interesting. Like I think that's one of the first black holes that you find when you start to really get into sales engagement and this like hey, structure process that I want someone to follow that, you know, is optimized to really get, you know, this desired outcome, whether it's a meeting or, you know, rebooking, a no show or whatever it is. But like this data piece becomes really important. You know, we like to say here like outreaches an engine, like it can do really great but if you don't put in awesome fuel, then like it's only going to go so fast. How do you help people? So I mean that sounds like an investment. I'm going to hire people on up work for four to six dollars an hour and, like a lot of people, wouldn't go that route. If you're one person and you have to do the job, how much weight do you place on getting your data right in the research right correct? So the way we think about it is a framework that I stole from Tim Ferries over. It is for our work week book maybe ten, twelve years ago, and it's eliminate out of a delegate to you follow that mentality. But everything you start doing you do yourself. After you're doing it well, feel free to delegate and if you can delegate on the other person can do it. Well, try to figure out is there a way to automate right. You know, if you are buying into the framework of okay, yeah, I can now make a hundred calls a day and send five hundred emails if I want to. But you've never written a personalized email and you're just trying to crank out any email out there, then your effectiveness is going to be so small that even if you crank up five times to volume, your results are going to be really bad and you're just going to burn through your leads. And I see this is like the most common mistake that so many companies are doing. They're just like buying marketing automation software, essentially, or sales engagement software and blasting the market, and that won't get your results. What are you gonna do is first go and write ten hyper personalized emails to ten very valuable prospects, go through that motion and then what would be your follow up emails to that? What would be your follow up email to that? And then spend a month just doing me that and then, after your month is done, go back and operational license, figure out what parts, parts of that email can be turned into templates, or turn those emails into templates and figure out what parts of those emails are variables that are always truth, like company name and first name and things like that, and what other parts do you need to do a little bit of research on, such as like language as they speak, or organizations they volunteer at or number of employees that they have for a certain department. After you can do that, then you can delegate it. So give it to somebody else who can delegate that and then, maybe even further, you can out of me. Hey, can you build an API plug in that will go and clean up their company name and, stead of saying I'll reached out io ink, it will just say I'll reach and if we can do that, you've operationalized to excellence. But it's a slow process...

...to get you to automating everything, and once it's automated, your soults are going to go through the roof. It's crazy to me that, like people really equate automation with this like slashing burn mentality, like that's the first thing. Like if you give a rep that ability to automate their work, they're immediately going to go to volume. Help me understand a little bit. How do you talk to people about that? How do you make sure that doesn't happen? You advise a lot of companies to how do you help them understand that? Like that's not the best first step, like that's going to kill you in the end. I just run them through a math exercise about their target audience. Right. I'm like, how many companies are trying to reach out to? What's your market? They're like, well, a thousand or three thousand or five thousand. I'm like, okay, how many person has do you have? They're like, okay, maybe three or four of them trying to reach out to like okay, five thousand. There's Twentyzero people. You're emailing five hundred a day. Your emailing let's say, twozero a week. You have twentyzero. What are you going to do? After ten weeks you'll be emailed for everybody. They're like, I don't know, I'm want to email them again. Okay, same message. You're going to burn through your lead so quickly. Right. So what I tell him is one of your most important metrics is your account to demo ratio, right, or your yield. How many accounts are you yielding to conversion? Right? So with one of our clients, I think I have this statistics a little bit better before, because we got five hundred accounts on. We got them sixty seven demos with five hundred accounts. Right. So that's an awesome yell because they have fivezero accounts and now we know we can get them six hundred and seventy demos. And six hundred and seventy demos will give him work for a couple of years. So now they can just up the number of people or, you know, control that variable and it will be consistent. But if you email blast your whole market and whatever soults you get, it's not skill, but you can't double that, you can triple that. So focus on your yield first. automations always second. That's super interesting. Not only is there like a calculatable lifespan, but this idea that what are you going to do the second time, what you can do the third time? And then you can't double and triple something when you just done it with a hundred percent of your people. Right, like there's no way to get three times better at like sending out five hundred emails a day. It's just not going to work. How do you get people to think about this first set of accounts and going after them, to kind of set that first yield metric to help them understand, like give me like a pattern or a sequence of steps that you're using to go after them and the time value associated with each one that it takes for a rep to do it. What are you going to figure out is who derives the most value from your product? Right, who would be most excited to use it? So, for example, when I was at Reputationcom, we were a technology that was helping companies get better ratings and reviews on their Google maps locations. So what we cared about is how many locations do you have and how valuable it would be to get better ratings. So...

I looked at a few different things. I looked at WHO's searching for things online, that ends up looking at a map, ends up looking at locations, and how valuable are those customers? So I know that restaurants do that a lot. But I also knew that, like when you're looking for a plumber, when you're looking for like any service and electrician, like whatever, you're looking at that, but also when you're looking for apartments, like when I'm looking to move, I want an apartment in a very specific geographical locations or car dealerships. So he started identifying some of the areas and you can do that through a variety of different ways. Like if you're early stage startup, you just got to think long and hard about it, but if you're a more establish company, you can start looking at your internal customers, who's already using what you're selling and why are they using it, and then try to estimate the value. So what I found out is if I reach out to companies that had apartment buildings in San Francisco, I know that the average rent there for two better apartment is about forty five hundred bucks. I knew that a successful lead conversion for them was very valuable. So charging them a hundred bucks a month for for our software was very cheap. Right. If they get one more client per one more client that year, it paid for that in a set. Yeah, so I was like, they derive the most value and that's why I focus on them. Right. Well, if I focus on restaurants, a pizza shop might make a fifty cent profit margin on their pizza sale. As long as valuable to get that and then it's like you're gonna convince some of the volume of leads and so on. So I focus on quality first, but I would encourage everybody to go on their crm or look at their client list figure out who is using their technology and why. Why are those people finding it helpful? Sometimes you have to even go interview those customers and once you have that data is much easier to hone into a group and find either on association or a trade show or some sort of way to track who is involved in this industry. Where can I find more people like them and start building a list. So build a list with the lowest hanging fruit that you can find. Right. That's a little bit easier said than done, but I think as a leader or as a sales wrap, like that's partially what you're getting paid for, is the expertise to be able to do that. Like we have to eliminate an excuse of that's hard from from our you know reasons we don't do things, just because it keeps us from getting busy on the things that are important. So then tell me, like what is like a pattern or a sequence that you'll use to go after someone? Once you have those identified, you then target like your personas, and then what is the series of steps you'd use to get in touch with someone? I'll clarify something there. Rather than the lowest hanging fruit, you should go to the highest value accounts. Right. So it might be lower hanging for Reputationcom to go talk to the restaurants that are already looking for this, but the problem with that is they don't drive us much value. Right, they are looking at ten competitors because they're like really looking for a solution that fits exactly how they wanted to fit. But despite the fact that it's easier to get the meeting, is not easier to drive revenue.

Well, if you reach out to somebody who doesn't necessarily know that you exist or this technology is even possible, yet it would create high value for them. You have an amazing target right, and this usually get some people to rethink, like for me, when we're doing cells toplom in services. Yes, we can go after every startup in Silicon Valley and help them do cells devloment, but hey, guess what, I actually talk to a bank that wants us to help them set up meetings with fortune five hundred companies, companies like apple that have a hundred billion or three hundred billion dollars in cash and helping manage that money. And if you can do that, you can get paid tons of money to help a company I usually doesn't have a sales development function set up meetings for them and they're very much willing to pay for that. So don't go for the lowest hanging thought necessarily. Go for WHO's looking for your solution. Go for who would benefit the most if they had this motion. And then we're going to write a sequence to answer the question you're asking. Is Right. An email yourself like it put some work right, so I should publish this one. But I remember sending an email first to I think I even know you actually reach out to me. But for Lars Neilson, I remember that I send him an email, like the way large and I became good friends. is as in him an email as a lars, we met briefly at a conference before. I was just looking at your company and I found all these things about you, like you have fifty five reps split between all these geographies. You using Marquetto using Bombora, using this technology. I know this how you operate. I know revenue efficiency really matters to you. I think I have some ideas about how to help you, which would be open to a chat. And he actually ended up like grabbing that email sending it to his whole organization saying this is how you do are bound called self development. You guys should think about this unimplemented more. But it's just like be very caring, like if you willing to give and figure out what they care about and how you can impact our business. You gotta understand a little bit better what's the impact that your technology or your solution or you're offering has in your clients and if you can explain that briefly and with arguments, about their specific situation and how you would improve that. You're setting yourself up for success. Do you start with email or start with phone? I don't think it matters necessarily. We tend to start with phone in a very interesting way, though, like we start with phone and then seven minutes later we trigger an email that says, hey, mark, I just called you at Blah Blah Blah. Is that the best number to reach you at? And then quick introduction to why we were reaching out right. So I saw you blah blah, blah, Blah Blah and found this in a linkedin profile and so I thought this would be a good fit, and so on. So we like phone first, but you might as well do the same, like some people emails saying can I call you in fifteen minutes at this number, and then people are like why are you going to call me? And then they open your email on. Yeah, some people might get annoyed. So like some people over us this, and you just got to make...

...sure that your actual email content and the things they are saying are hyper relevant to your market. So how many phone calls, how many emails will you put in a sequence before you give up? We usually have nine total steps. But that's our average and here's how we're thinking about it and operationalizing to excellence. Our first sequence to a company is actually a little bit shorter. We might go five to eight steps, and the reason for it is we just want to grab the low hanging fruit and move account to account to account really quickly. So we don't want to spend too much time trying to get this one person on account x. If there's another tenzero accounts we could be reaching out to. They might be meeting our solution, open to discussing it. We're just like insisting on this bad prospect. Right. So we do five touches. It might be three calls to emails or to call three emails, run through our whole market really quickly and then go back to square one. On the second goal, we might do eight to ten touches. We're going to add maybe a social touch. We're going to add a little bit more personalized information in there. We have refined a little bit our our phone script because we've talked to so many people already. And then we're going to go again through the whole market and then we go back to score one. I'm we might do twelve, Thirteen fifteen touches. So I increase in number of touches a site, touch accounts multiple times, but I always let them rest for at least three to six months on the reason for it is your priorities change every three to six months. If you ask me what I needed six months ago ver so what I need now very different. What I'm looking at now versus what I'm going to be looking at six months from now. I don't know what it's going to be, but it's I know it's going to be different. So I now you're an analytics guy and I'm super interested to see if you can pull this number off the top of your head. How many people do you think reply to that email that says did you? Did I dial the right phone number with a correct phone number? Yeah, I I mean that's a strategy that we've run. Again, that I haven't run specifically on our accounts, like we do the opposite. We call and then Oh, or that's where you're asking that I catch it this right number. Yeah, we've had a few people tell us that it's not the right number, but we're not doing that to increase replies. We're doing that to increase open rates and then will we want them to reply to? Is the messaging below it right as like, Oh, I saw again, like I saw that you lead a sales team off a lot of remote sales trips and I know that keeping the conversations consistent across your team might be difficult. This other companies doing the same and here's the result. So you should use goal recording services like x right. Would you be open to a conversation? But it does is they will respond to the second part of the Emil. Don't say that wasn't my right phone number. Right, if they want to call that, just except the men. If they don't want to call they weren't correct. You to the right phone of her, but it will for sure increase your open rights. Yeah, that's interesting. All right. Tell me a little bit about in the last year or so where sales engagement platforms and technology have really come to prominence. I would consider them a necessary part of...

...any sales team if you want to run with best practices. Like tell me how that is changed how you do things from back your citrics days when they were doing a hundred two, hundred and fifty dollars a day, and how has it helped you? How has it hurt you? How is it help you understand what you do better? Yeah, I think that one of the biggest things is that you can have their reps understand much better why they're doing what they're doing. Back in the citric stays, we needed to be operating at scale for us to be able to really use it correctly. Right. So our biggest thing was that we had a couple of data analyst that were analyzing all the call logs. In the background, I'm trying to figure out what calls were going, how far, trying to like link that to the call source and things like that, and just very complicated like math. And then the decisions were being made in the exech level to decide are going to hire more people, how many more calls are going to make and so on, and try to drive all these statistics. Like with today's technology, I can have one str to hotter calls on hundred emails. The really good they can look other statistics and figure out how many open rates, how many was our response rate, and even further, like what's our positive response rate like? If I said this email, what percentage of the responses is actually positive? Right, because a very easy way to increase response rates is start with your email by saying hi John. If this is not a good fit, just told me no and I won't email you again. And then, like what immediately would do is just reply no, I don't even read the rest of the emails, though. We probably rate through the roof. Yet PASSO responses go down. So you got to understand all those metrics to they sales engagement tools allow you to understand really what is actually working to get you closer to a meeting and get you closer to a sale. Rather than having to have a team of Tennesse y ours, a sales ops person, data person, a manager. Before you needed fifteen, twenty people. Today what you can probably run a really effective team with three to five. I remember the first time that I worked with my sales team on creating a sequence, you know, as in this Hampton in in northern Virginia, with a whiteboard with a guy named Chris and Chris and I'm mapped out this eight step or nine step process that was supposed to happen over three weeks and it worked really great for him for two weeks and he could somewhat manage it himself and because of that initial success, we wrote it out to the rest of the team and, you know, after two months there was one guy on my, you know, twelve to fifteen person team that could actually manage the process the way that we wanted to run it, because the rest were just running it in spread cheets and he's in their calendar and it was just kind of like all over the place. Like how much easier is it now for your team to like run a really coordinated process in order to get a meeting like you talked about earlier? Here's our five touches in the next time around here's are eight touches. Then the next time around here's our twelve touches. How much more fidelity do you think people have to the system now than they used to?...

I think it's much easier, right, because sells, engagement platforms allow you to take your next action with little clicks, right. So before a lot of reps were living in their crm. Then you have to click around, find the account, then find the contact and find the tasks, then figure out what you're going to do next. Then either, you know, make the action like call from your cell phone, go back market completed. Like it's so much work, while with today's technology to you can just go on, execute, execute, execute, execute, and the leads get thrown into a sequence off steps that needs to be followed and you log in and it tells you exactly what you're going to do. So you don't even need to think too much about it. However, I still recommend people understand the dynamics behind it or why we're throwing what we're doing. So, yeah, it's infinitely simpler to run much more complex workflows that are required today. Because, again, if you send me a mass email in one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight, three percent response rate right today, like zero points of Zeros Er one right. Yeah, it's insane. You just need to get so much better for you to be able to get even. If you get templates, are getting one percent positive response rate, one to two. Your genius, like you can email hunter people get a meeting. You're the best. Yeah, I mean that would yield you. Imagine if we can send a hundred emails a day. Are Your positive response rate? This one percent? We have a few templates for a few of our campaigns that get us one percent, one point one or one point two. Things our highest one, but with a hundred emails we get a meeting. So that means in a month, twenty work days. where's any hundred emails to day we get twenty meetings just via email. I want to end this by asking you two specific questions. I'll let me ask the first one, which has to do with this because I find it super compelling, is there's a lot of noise today. You know, you can argue there's more noise today than there was ten years ago. I don't know if there is or not. You know, I think people were still busy ten years ago. But why do you think, or how do you think somebody can get really good at breaking through the noise? Like, how do you get to that one to two percent positive reply? Right, it's all about providing insights. Like you're saying, there's there's a lot of information being thrown at us. On what catches my eye, on what probably catches your I mark was an executive for a company. Is What are you telling me that is relevant to my context, that can make me better? HMM. Right. If you can make me and my team better in a way that I care about, you're going to win. I don't care what you do, how you do it. I recently told this was somebody on my team that asked me about it. I said I pay for things that bring me value, and that includes our tools and our salaries and everything else. Like you're not bringing value, I don't pay, and that means pay money or pay attention, by the way. So if you don't bring me value, I'm not paying attention and I'm not paying money. It's funny you mentioned that. I almost in some ways, and you...

...can tell me if I think I'm wrong here, but in some ways I almost think it doesn't matter so much what the message is, as long as the message very concisely states how you provide value. What's more important is being in front of that person at the right time when they're willing to consider that message. Would you find that to be true or not? Are Is it is a message more important than timing? No, I think of course timing is going to be important, but it also too, depends. Can this is a little bit of the question about biggest value over so slowest singing fruit right. So, like one strategy is to go after the lowest hanging truth, which is can I use intense data I can source from some from provider like one Bora, figure out who's looking for a solution similar to what I'm selling and then email them. Are you going to run into hyper competitive deals where they know they need you and they try to squeeze your margins down? And then the second option is go try to figure out WHO's the highest value account. We're like, for example, for you right at our reach, what are the industries in which getting a meeting with a potential customer or partner or channel partner or whatever it is, are the most expensive? Like I'm talking to a client right now for us where the cost per meeting they currently have is between eight and tenzeros because they only give them a trade shows. I'm like, I'll get them to you for less than a thousand. Another like insane, and this is they're like, we've tried out sourcing. It's a paint of the as, like we hate it, like it's all like blasting emails and we annoy customers and we only focus on fortune five hundred. But we follow the same methodology that we're talking about today right, like hypertransparent, use all the coal recordings you can, hyperpersonalized templates and even if it's not the right time, it depends where you're focusing on right. So for us, yes, we try. We want to get as many meanings as possible. But, like I said, I just had a client open and email from us. I was like seven or nine months ago that we sent it and we detected that. We're like seven months ago that he opened this em like send this email seven months ago. He just opened it. It's the right time. We call them, we've got our meeting. So the timing matters. But do you want to hyper focus on timing and optimized for the short term, or do you want to hypers focus on value, on try to bring the highest value clients over time and focus on that? So I don't think one approach is better than the other. It just what is your completely focusing on? If you're in a stretch for increasing revenue, maybe timing. If you're trying to build a long term, sustainable, high profit margin business, focus on value. I think it's good. So let me finish with this last question. Let's say you had to go back three years in sales engagement technology. He had to use what was only available three or four years ago. What would be your biggest pain and implementing your highly successful strategy right now if I was using my tools. I think even three years ago, there's still an inability to build the playbuck the right way. So...

...there was like mail merge that I was using. There was some email tracking, but it was not perfectly integrated. There are no ways to like hit up place such as like after three opens, like make a call. So I think there have been. And also the user interface. It was just so much more difficult, like you had to be a computer geek to be able to execute. Literally in today's world, with the technology and how easy it is to execute tasks. I have people who are in their s or even, yeah, late S, who aren't good at computers. They don't know how to Work Excel for me last at all. They've never done that. They barely navigate through browsers. Yet if I put them on our each other log in, they know where to click on, what to do and how to work. So literally, a ten year old of five year old configure it out of fifty five year old configure out. You give me the platform and it's just like clay can do and you can make maud of thetory to select a disposition on the phone and you know tells him it won't let them send if a variable is not inputted. So there's like controls so that you don't mess it up. Like I've sent emails for five years ago, likely not to a tone of people, but we're like the variable with like parentheses, enter their name. Oh my God, what am I doing? And then like everybody's like we hate your spam. I'm like, sucks, you won't run into those problems today. Yeah, well, Tito. As always, man, appreciate the conversation. I encourage everyone listening search for Tito on Linkedin. He has three or four, maybe five articles on Linkedin that I'll just blow your mind, thinking about sales development, how to organize territories and just some very provocative stuff that you may or may not agree with, but it does the ultimate thing that great content does, which it makes you think and solidify your own beliefs. And I just want to thank you for coming on today, Tito, and given us some time and, if you want to give a everybody that's listen in a quick little hey, this is what alti sales does and how to get a hold of you. Yeah, definitely thanks for hosting me and again, like I am Tito Boar to you can find me on Linkedin. That's probably the best way. If you mentioned you heard about me on this podcast, I'll accept to us a friend. We can chat more. Happy to help then. Yeah, at all these sales. I mean we're helping companies build sales of ament teams that it might be start team, which is like we're starting from scratch. You don't even have the data, you don't have anything. You just want more conversations. You need more sales. Smallest companies we've work with don't even have any bribeel like their and hy combinator, or they're like really starting out. And then again, you've heard, we work with CITRIX and huge companies too. So if you have a team and you're trying to get better and you don't know how or how to operationalize it, call me up on my team can help you figure out. What are the best data sources? How do we find intent? How do we provide more value? How do we explain things briefly?...

How do we run in smart and interesting place on our sequences? How do we measure the effectiveness of our campaigns? And then how do we ultimately scale this so that your team has a revenue engine? So yeah, I think that's it. Boom. Well, height, that's all for today. Thanks, t dough, and we'll catch you guys on the next sales engagement podcast. Yeah, thank you, Mark Bok soon. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. Join US at sales engagementcom or new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement coming soon. To get the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure to check out outreach that I am the leading sales and easement plant. See you on the next episode.

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