The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

Five Secrets of Wild Sales Success w/ Adam Clark

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“Sales is the best career in the world!” says Adam Clark, the director of sales at Repay.

“It is the only career that you can work for somebody else while being your own boss. You are responsible for your own destiny. You can decide what you want to get paid. You can decide what hours you want to work, and you can ultimately decide how successful or not you want to be. So have fun doing it.”

Clark offered five tips on how to succeed in sales (without really trying).

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast.This podcast is brought to you by outreach dot ioh, the leading sales engagementplatform helping companies, sellers and customer success engaged with buyers and customers in themodern sales era. Check out sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in thebook on sales engagement coming soon. Now let's get into today's episode. Hellolisteners, my name is Scott Barker. Had A partnerships and revenue at saleshacker. I'm lucky enough to be your houst today, so thanks for joiningus. Appreciate you lending us your ear drums for the next thirty or fortyminutes. All right, my guest is none other than Mr Adam Clark,the director of sales over at repay. Adam, welcome to podcast, man, Scott. Thanks really excited to be today, excited to have you onand I feel like it's been a long time coming for some some context.Adam and I met at a at a dinner a while back, and I'vegot to say you're one of my favorite people to bump into at conferences.You know, you've always got this this big smile on, always in afantastic mood and when you're on the conference grind and sometimes in it, that'sthat's exactly what you need. So so thank you for that. Yeah,absolutely, man, the feelings mutual. I had such a good time meetingyou and it's been great thing connected and just talking shop all this time andreally looking forward to bumping you again pretty soon. I intend you go inMarch and you know you talked it. We've talked a lot about personalize andstuff, and you know how busy I stay with all my kids, soyou know when I get some time to relax and for myself with those conferences, it's it's a lot of far. Look forward to it absolutely. Yeah, as very, very busy man. And yes, a San Yeah,I'm looking forward to San Diego. And you're actually speaking down at unleash,correct. I am. Yeah, very excited about that. was talking tomany and the act a while back actually a dream force, and let themknow that I would love to engage at unleash and they were gracious enough togive me some time to run my mouth in front of all these ends.So I'll be doing some some panel work and then also speaking to the veteransthat are coming in on Wednesday. Very excited about that. That's awesome.Yeah, that's going to be a really cool thing that I've been looking forwardto. Down at unleash we got some veterans in sales who are basically tryingto break into technology sales. are going to read some some training and it'sit's going to be cool. But Anyway, we've got some limited time here,so I really want to get get right into it. I want peopleto kind of hear your story because it's a it's an interesting one for sure, and I think I think of the Bat. You know, you havesuch a unique background at so let's quickly...

...talk about that. Let's talk aboutyour life before sales. Okay, so you know a little bit about that, but I'm kind of give you the breakdown. So when I left school, got out of college, I actually got into sales pretty much right awayand the insurance and finance industry rose through the ranks pretty quickly. I wasa very young guy, learned a lot. Had some fantastic leaders that I thatI trained under, and it was an interesting industry. You know,it's definitely a sink or swim kind of an industry. We did not havethe technology that I have available today. So I got to learn a lotof old school tricks that are still applicable after the better part of about adecade. I made a transition in the public service. Just decided to dosomething a little different now. became a law enforcement officer, actually worked patroland then transitioned into some investigative work, pharmaceutical frauds, things like that.We could probably take up the rest of this time telling fun stories and talkingabout all that cool stuff. But openly the siren call the sales brought meback. I think I'm just a sale guy at heart and I love peopleand even though law enforcement is also a people business, it's just a differentkind of people business and the hours, very small paycheck and some of theother drawbacks. The pros column was not as big as the conclum so backto tales like a yeah, yeah, that makes sense, and sometimes it'sI think it's such a shame that in the public, you know sector atthat paychecks on all ice match the work. Unfortunately, I couldn't agree more.Couldn't any more. That DOUB was a lot harder than this points.Yeah, I bet, I bet, maybe not on the last day ofa quarter, but it's probably so. I think I got to ask forone story. Do you have, like a go to maybe fraud story thatyou have from those days? Oh goodness, what would be? It would bea good one. I think a good one would be I was onpatrol one evening and was was creating around the neighborhood and got a call abouttwo o'clock in the morning, I think. got a call that someone had noticedsomeone breaking into some vehicles and I just happened to be in the neighborhoods. I pull around and and sure enough, happened to see him in the act. So I got out and we got a nice little foot race endedup catching him and the funny the funny part about the story was when Icaught the guy he was pretty intoxicated. He was he was compliant with meand when I started to search him, he had been stealing things out ofthe vehicles and putting them all and as he was acquiring these new goods.So he had three pairs of pants on, several shirts, you know, severalbackpacks and he was just acquiring and building onto his person all of thesethings that he was calling at the phople so that was pretty entertaining. Turnedout that he was the manager of one of the local establishments in the townthat I frequented pretty often to get some of my approaching supplements and the vitamins, and about six months later I remember...

...walking in and locking eyes with theguys the first time I've seen him after that in today, and just heput both of his hands up and said I've been good, I haven't calledany more trouble. That is a that is a great story and for thoselistening you can't see Adam. Obviously Adams a pretty big guy, not aguy that you want watching some play at night, that's for sure. That'sthat's so let's talk a little bit about that. That transition for you,you know, from the public sector back in to two sales. You knowwhat was the hardest part of that transition? Yeah, that's a great that's agreat question because even though I started out in sales and started out inthe professional world, making that change in the public sector, especially the lawenforcement it was a big change and then it was just as big a changecoming back into the business world. For me it wasn't. I don't thinkit would be too bad. My transition maybe compared to someone who had neverhad the business experience before might have been a little easier. However, itdid, it didn't come without a challenge. The two biggest things were communication anddecisionmaking. In my opinion, my experience. So, going into thelaw enforce of world, learning how to communicate in that style and dealing withsome of the things that we were dealing with. It was very different.As a very direct communication style. Sometimes it needed to be a very athortativecommunication style. It's so coming back into the professional setting, that was anadjustment. I'm still a very direct person. Can sometimes still find myself in thesituations where I'm calling things like a team and not everybody's used to thatin the corporate world. So finding how to how to fit that in andbe cognisant of that has been has been a big challenge. And the otherthing is decision making. When you are working in that type of environment,law enforcement environment, you have to make decisions very quickly. You have toprocess a lot of information. Sometimes that information is dangerous information. You knownot to be overly dramatic about it, but you depending on what you're doing, it can get to a life and situation sometimes so making a quick call, being confident with that quick call, knowing how to back it up.That is absolutely paramount when you're doing that kind of work. So, transitioningin back into the corporate world, I was still very quick to make decisions. I can process a lot of data very, very, very quickly,and when it's not data that could potentially mean bodily harm for me, it'seven easier in a process large amounts of data really quickly and come to aconclusion that I'm confident in and move forward with it. Once again, likewith the communication, I've found that that's not always the case with a lotof folks that I work with. You haven't had that life experience and theyjust process things differently, and so mean navigating those waters and understanding who willmy team processes things a certain way and that when when I'm ready to dosomething, that I might be ahead of the game or there's something else Ineed to consider or we need to slow take a look at. That's probablybeen the two biggest Charles. Really it's super interesting and and things you don'tyou don't have her think about right because essentially, when you're when you're puttingyourself in you know, life and death...

...positions. You're almost rewiring your brainor bringing out the side of your brain that you know, maybe we utilizetenzero years ago, every day kind of thing, and you got a processof that information, make it happen and then be very confident in your yourdecision moving forward. And I could see how. You know there's there's alot of people out there that in the business world that like to have alot of meetings about things. Like it's away every every possible side and andsee it from all angles, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but youknow, when someone's moving moving quick I could see how it would be anadjustment for you. And then the communication side is a super interesting because thethe funny thing about sales I found. Yes, of course you have toplay the game a little bit, but being direct, I've found, isa very effective strategy. You know, just just making that ask and andbeing comfortable with that ask and just saying it directly. I found being,you know, helpful in my my personal career, so it's interesting that overlapsthere. Yeah, and that's that's a really, really valid for to youknow, with within direct sales situations. You know, that is absolutely absolutelyright. You being direct definitely outways being around the Bush and trying to colorthings up. The struggle for me with the communication side has been more internalwithin my organizations. From that, you know that corporate culture kind of astandpoint that it doesn't always play well in those regards. But but yeah,definitely does play well when you're in on a on a sales call. Yeah, that makes sense for sure. When you're when you're leading a team,you can't always, you know, say exactly what pops into your faith getyou some Jeva. Let's take that step further than let's let's talk about ifsomeone's listening this and maybe they are new to sales and maybe they're or maybethat's thinking about making, you know, a major career drop jump into,you know, the sales profession, what advice would you get there? Thefirst thing that I would I would just tell them is make the joke.I happen to think that sales is the best career in the world. Ithink it is the only career that you can work for somebody else while beingyour own boss the same time. And you are going to especially when you'retransitioning from something that you might be familiar with more transitioning rolls into a intoa production type of role. You're going to get a lot of people thatare going to give you bad advice. Quite frankly, they're going to tellyou, oh, it's really difficult. You're going to be commission you knowit's, you know, not stable income, it's very hard. You know thethe fate of the company's resting when your shoulders. You're going to geta lot of things that might discourage you from doing that. I would tellyou to figure out a way to turn that off and not listen to thosefolks, because it's probably the most rewarding career you can have from a corporatestandpoint. Also, probably the most important thing to consider is the fit forwhat type of sales will you're going to get into. You need to makesure you pick a company that that has...

...a mission you can agree with thembuy into, because you know it's the great, powerful Grand Card. Onwhat said, you're you can only sell as much as your soul, soyou don't really have to believe in what you're doing in order to be effectiveat it. And the people that are involved with that old relation to youcould either start out with you know, a rocket ship and just Fli ashigh as you want to, depending on the organization and company that you're with, or you could be in a tiny little singling in Testa and never reallyget off the ground with your relation and it can burn you out and callyou to turn away from what potentially could have been a life changing career.Yeah, I'll very valid points and we definitely share the same, the sameviewpoint on this. funnily enough, I was actually having a conversation just yesterdaywith a young man who was a firefighter and he was I met him onone of my recent travels and he was he was just not feeling like itwas like completely just like wanted more and really wanted a challenge, and Istarted talking to him about about sales and that the path to get there,and he was it. Was Pretty excited about it. And so it's definitelywherever you're at in your career, it's never too late to make that chownout and I always tell folks do when when they're starting out. You know, if they're if they're looking at an organization and they're really passionate about amission, somebody's doing a great way to break into it is to to showyour ten asking and don't take no for an put yourself out there in away that you would also put yourself out there conducting the role those sell yourselffirst. It's the most important. So you'll make in that career change.Yeah, yeah, yeah, couldn't agree more. I think he the this. Going back to this gentleman I was stalking yesterday, just asked what's theprerequisite? What's it like? What I have to do? You just gotto show that you're willing to work here at ass up. That's the notafraid the word. Know. Oh, yeah, exactly. That's the freerequis. That all right? So this is super interesting. What lessons haveyou pulled from your past experience that had made you a better seller and abetter leader? And you mentioned a few there that were kind of challenges,but I also see you know, you know, positive things in both ofthem. What are the lessons have you pulled? Yeah, absolutely, there'sdefinitely two sides of the coin for that. And, like I said, Ihad some sealed experience prior to transitioning in the public service. So andI was successful, but I didn't know what I didn't know and my timespent in public service and learning the things that I did during that really didhelp hound down some of the rough edges that I had earlier in my career. A couple of things that I learned from my time prior to what I'mdoing now, especially in the public service world, is that there's a lotmore than just what's really available to you, a lot more to people in alot more to situations and what's really available, and learning how to figureout what that is and how those are impacting the things that already available,readily available to you is really really important and a crucial step to kind ofrising to that next level, looking at the totality of the circumstances are infront of you, not just what's in...

...front of you. You know,is this CEO that I'm talking to? You know how I truely learn what'sgoing on with him and his life in his company, or am I justso focused on what I'm trying to push in there that I'm might be pushingup against something that is totally irrelevant to him at the time, where ifI had just taken some time to understand what's truly going on in his situation, perhaps I could have found an angle that would have been more immediately relevant. So that that's been that's been really valuable to me. The probably morethan anything else, is the importance of discipline and training, and I can'tstress that enough. One of the reasons why both military law enforcement by trainingis so crucial is because, like I said, with that decision making andneed needing to make decisions fast. You your training needs to be so soundthat you do things without even realizing that you're doing them as part of yourdecision making process. It's a very reactive thing that your body is anticipating somethingand respond accordingly. That is so applicable in the sales world it's not evenfunny. So things like, you know, training on how to handle objections,rehearsing how to handle objections, you know, role playing with your team, all of those kind of things will all keep your act sharp so thatyou are really, really effective when you're out there working and being disciplined inyour process and the things that you do day in and day out. Youknow. So if you are, you know in the military, if you'rea high level person the military, and making sure you keeping your body inthe best shape as possible, make sure you keep your mind in the bestshape as possible, make sure you keep your weaponry is clean and is efficientin a world as possible. All of those things apply to your sales process. They apply to your data. So keeping your data super clean so youhave something nice to work with, making sure that as you're adding to thatdata, that you're taking a little bit extra time to make sure your inputsare super clean, and then you make sure you're paying attention to how thatprocess is working for you with every step of the way so that you canbe super effective and being in command of that, being truly in command ofit and understanding that it's your tool and not then you are not a secondaryparty to that, that you are the primary party to the process. Youcontrol the process, the process that will control you. Boom, my jobright there. I love that. I love that. So so what I'mhearing there is that you know, you kind of used essentially your detective skillsthat you picked up in the public sector and applied them in a sales youknow position that you're not taking what people are saying is not on face value. You know, I think a lot of salespeople it's all into your category. Sometimes where they have rose colored classes on a deal and they're you know, they've got their champion or two and the okay, now, these arethe ones, these are good, but they're not paying attention to all theminute details that are going on around the company. And then, you know, couldn't agree more with the discipline and training aspect of bringing that to sales, which I think is so important. I say all the time I thinkthe number one thing to be successful right...

...now in sales is a learning agility, and you know that's basically being a lifelong learner and being able to pickthings up quick and then, you know what, you ended there with onehundred percent ownership of everything you do. I think, whether it's sales orlife, that's that's kind of the the key right. Think extreme ownership can'tbe understated in that regard, that's for sure, and I think I thankyou guys that I reaches, specially last year at least, got really familiarwith the concept of a Stinger. I hate that I missed that one,but yeah, yeah, you understanding, understanding that there's more under the surfaceeverything that you're doing with your leadership, with your other Reps. me,as a field leader, that's something that I practice every single day with myteam. You know, I know that there is more going on these people'slives that I'm impacting professionally. It impacts more than just their professional lives.I'm also impacting their personal lives and the things would happen to work they takehome with them. Things that happen at home they bring to work with them. So understanding there's more more than just what's on the surface there and there'sthese people are more than just what they're producing from our organization. So andthat carries forward to your prospects, it carries forward in your personal life.That everything to do. Yeah, yeah, couldn't agree more. And for anyonewho wants to learn a little bit more about extreme ownership, I wouldcheck out Jacko Willick. He's got some some amazing things on that the subject. But let's go down that path a little bit. So definitely, youknow, I think you have such an amazing outlook on management and people,but also process and repaid. The company that you're at right now is kindof in this interesting place between an you can correct me if I'm wrong,but between kind of finance and technology and finance and D are yeah, perfect. So. And then finance, in my eyes anyway, is typically seenas more of, quote unquote, an old school industry. How are youguys disrupting that industry, because I know you're bringing to that world some somenew tactics. Yes, we are, and I'm glad you brought that up. So we we, we do skate a line right between financial and technologyworld. So we definitely think ourselves as a truth, INTECH company within thefinest space. We are very hold and focused in payments process and electronic transactions, any ways that you can move money from one part to the other electronically. It is our main focus on the finance side. And then the technologyside, we are we are building a new innovative way to accomplish that,and some of these new innovative ways to accomplish that are also opening up newdoors that are allowing the people we're working with to shift their focus from avery commoditized vendor or unit relationship for payment processing into much more of a solutionsbased, softwares of service partnership where the things that we're building and providing forthem can help them make legitimate changes to...

...how they're operating their organizations. Itcan help them make personnel decisions, that can help them make large financial decisions. Specifically speaking to one of the verticals we service in the consumer lending market, our platform can allow them to make decisions on whether or not to Relandthe customers, which is an absolute core decision that that that business needs tomake, and we're doing out through our technology, which is something that weare very much at the forefront of you, and I don't know if, likedisrupt is necessarily what we're doing, but definitely steering things down a differentpath and I guess we are disrupting the thinking of what payment technology can dofor you. Yeah, yeah, I actually hey, he's in the worddisrupt, because it's become a look, like they say, now that itis what you do and I think you know the similarities between, you know, what you guys are doing and what we're at outreach trying to do inthat the sales industry as a whole. It's a lot of similarities there.So it's interesting. So I want to talk a little bit about still goingdown this route. So there are a ton of industries out there still using, you know, old school tactics, right, so they can be theycan be massively disruptive companies, you know, and they're selling a product that youknow it's ten years into the future, but they're using sales tactics from tenyears ago. So there's this weird like juxtaposition there. What would youradvice be to sales leaders in some of these more old school industries? Ithink that's a fantastic question start. So a lot of things that we doas human beings we do it because we see others do it. We doit because it's the way it's always been done, always been done, andyou know that's something that I wake up every morning and I said I'm goingto fight the way things have always been done within my organization. You know, I always try and strive to ask the question why the figure out whywe do it this way. Is this really the best way to do inour is there room propermulition improve and my philosophy of leadership, speaking directly thisquestion, I am taking a long way around, but I'm going to bringit back. My personal philosophy of leadership is definitely want to service, eventhough, organizationally speaking, you know, I'm here in my reps are underneathme. I work for them, I'm I am here to make sure thatthey have everything they need to be a successful as possible. I like thinkof it is on their caddy. From there, my my tiger woods.I'm going to help them figure out what the distances to the whole you know, if the sun is shouting a certain way, that means the grass isgoing to be been to a certain way. I want to figure out that.I want you know, I want them to know. Do they needto hit a block shot, that they need to hit a certain kind ofspin on the ball, all of those things. I want to deliver thatto them to give them the best stability to hit the prettiest golf shop theycan when they step up the swing a club. hopefullly, they have toswing the club. I can't swing it for him, but I can preparethem to swing it as true and as straight as possible. So if you'renot doing that as a leader, you're not putting your people in the bestposition just see, and you're operating out of a habits and biased mindset insteadof a data and insight tone. And when you make that shift from habitsand bias to data and insight, that's...

...when you truly equip your people tobe successful and in the modern sales were another's things. That will never goaway. You can never stop prospecting, you know. I know that inbald marketing and all that. You Know Leadin and demand Jin and all thatstuff is very popular these days, but if you set up your sales practiceto solely rely on those, ultimately you will fail. You have to prospect, you have to get out there and make opportunity. That will never changeno matter how long we get into this technology, technology advancement, contialed engagement. The way I like to think of it, I like to hunt.I'm also, you know, really into the military and things like that.So I like to think of it as you know, today, in twothousand and nineteen we play in an extremely fast paced, extremely fast paced thejungle, and as sales people were hunting in that jungle, okay, andand if you were using old school tactics, then essentially you have a team ofpeople that are running around this jungle with sticks and stoves and now there'sa limited amount of game. Your competition, however, these guys have a teamof drones that are tracking, tracking the targets. They've got a wholegroup of people in the ground with night vision goggles in the most advanced weaponryand targeting systems and communications that they can have available soil, you just can'tcompete. If you're using old school tactic, it's going to get to the pointwhere you will be outclassed, you'll be out gun and no matter howgreat your product is, if you don't have a solid sales engagement strategy acouple with your good and market strategy in the foundation of that, then you'llnever be able to penetrate that great product deep enough against competition who is moreengaged on in modern sales sects. Well, I think this is a point wherepeople listening are going to go go back and rewind four minutes and listento that again, because there was a lot in there. There's a lotof really, really great advice in there. You know, about becoming a servantleader. I love this idea of you know, if you're still operatingas a as a leader on habit and bias, you know what people havetraditionally done in your industry and you're not looking at the data insights from companiesthat are leading the way, not just in your industry, but you knowin the world and picking up on that, you know you're basically doing a massivedisservice to to your team. And Love the analogy about, you know, hunting and weapons, and I would anyone looking to kind of break thishabit biased mentalities a great book called the power of habit by Tarles. Dodo him. Believe Great, great book worth worth every that was awesome.So this is the sales engagement podcast. So I've got to ask this thisquestion and I think a lot of your last answer kind of covered this indifferent ways. From a leadership perspective, how do you see engagement in saleschanging and how can I say, let's say, as a like from arerap perspective, how can I adapt?...

So the sales engagement space? Ithink it's still young in terms of where we can see this going in thefuture. You know, I think the ideas are there. I think theideas to some degree have always been there, but now we are starting to havesome tools to go along with these ideas, to bring into life,and it's really hard to tell where we're going to go with this. Youknow, how reach being an unbelievable example of that. You know, myorganization. We adopted out reach last year and it's done incredible things for us. So and just that short period of time. You know, can onlyimagine where it's going to go from here. I am absolutely confident that sales engagementas a whole, you know, the the segment of sales engagement,everything that that encompasses. I want to pull coaching into that too, becauseI think through sales engagement you open opportunities for additional sales coaching and I cango to that in a minute. But I think as a practice, salesengagement is going to become absolutely central to any business development. And if you'rea startup and you need to sell your organization and sell your product, youare going to have to have an unbelievable sales engagement foundation to begin doing that, to start penetrating into markets where large organizations are people are going to competeagainst. I've already started to do those things. I think that your goto market strategy is going to have to be underpinned with this, this reallygreat text, Ac if you will, if you know whether or not youbuild internally or just or what I would encourage you to do is just goingto call outreach and don't consider anybody else. But you know if you've got toequip your people to do that or you've got to equip yourself to doit. If you're if you're if you're the only person you know that's sellingyour relation to start with. Engagement as a practice is going to be yournew avenue from the things that your best at, like if you're you're startinga company and you've developed this software and you're really good to developing software,even though you may not have any sales experience, if you stand up areally solid engagement platform for yourself, you can become a high level producer.You can. It will fundamentally change the way organization you're structure where I,as a software developer, can build something to put out there, but Idon't need to go higher a gigantic sales force to accomplish that. I canjust establish a really strong sales engagement structure, bring some folks in that you maybehave a little experience or maybe somebody doesn't have any at all, plugthem into this system, turn them, lose coaching along the way and crankout really high level producers and grow my organization. That's where I see itgoing. As a rep, my advice is embrace the change, and Iknow that sounds that the issue said them done, especially for veteran sales bokes. If you want to stay relevant in the sales world, you've got toadopt these new technologies and you've got to be learning agile, your learning agility, like you just said. I love that, love that phrase. Learningagility. You know, you have to be able to spin and look atsomething new and say, okay, I see the value in that and tryit. Just try it, give it a go, let it, letit work your process for a couple of weeks. Work that process for acouple of weeks, start to see the results and and then really adopted yoursee pretty soon. That as engaging. I've already seen it within my organization. I have great examples of it that...

I can share. You have tokeep that short. We had extremely high level reps who've traditionally been the topof our heat get the clips to this year and they got eclipsed. Theygot a clips because we are putting some new things in place and we're puttingengagement in place that's allowing them to perform at levels previously unattainable and you're goingto start to see that. You're going to start to see dominating industry veteranswho've been selling in the space for decades get it clips to by first yearreps, because the first year reps are buying into engagement that's dumping everything theyneed right in their lap. Yeah, that's it for interesting and we hada conversation last week kind of in in the same thread of what you're sayingthere. And it's funny. Having sales engagement is kind of, you know, leveling the playing field and it's kind of favor and longer it's an equalizerexactly, and it's favoring those people, like you said, who who aren'tafraid to like fail, fast, iterate, try something new and keep moving forwardkind of thing, which absolutely, absolutely, yeah, and which isis kind of great, because that should be something that sales people are veryused to in a different way, you know, you're used to kind ofthe rejection and the failure, failure, failure, and then something works.I think we just have to take that mentality, you know, doesn't matter, to our process and just bit okay, let's just try and try and try, and still something hits and then we'll you know, run with thatuntil it doesn't and then we'll try and try and try. And Yeah,it's the interesting I tell yeah, I like to equate sales engagement to somethingelse that I'm very passionate about, and that's just distillation, distilling spirits.I'm really fascinated by the process of distillation starts and I know this may seemlike a really distant analogy, but if you think about it, you knowdistillation is bringing the highest quality things forward. Will sales engagement, if employed correctly, is bringing anything it's relevant to. There's people that you're targeting to thesurface for you to use and if you're if you have a good salesengagement strategy, you know you can pick personas, identify what's important to thosepersonals, set up a play in so see an automated plan and make sureyour follow up windows our own point, that you're that your tactics from pointthat you're messaging is on point and it's very consistent from prospect to prospect.You know, that's that's the power of so engagement is that distillation process ofseparating out all the stuff we don't need, just picking out what's important than applyingit to the right people. I love that. Yeah, probably oneof the more obscure sales references that that. I like it. Okay, sowe're actually kind of over our sign right now, but I want toask you, but well, this one one more question and I'm going topurposely leave it. Leave it, Zeg, and you can go where you wantto go. What are just three tips that you'd give to any salespersonout there and listening that is trying to...

...take their game to the next level? And I know we had literally hundreds throughout this conversation, but if youcould give three tips in closing, what would those be? Absolutely I thinkI three that will be good here, and possibly a fourth, but I'lltry and wrap it up quick you. The very first thing is become amaster your sales process. Truly understand what your sales process is for the organizationyou work with it. Every sales process is different from company to company,but becoming a true master of that, master of every single step and activitiesfor that are they're necessary and every single step, and being truly in commandof it, wielding it like it's your sword, like an extension of you. Do not let your process be in command of you do not let yourprospect be in command of your process. You know, if they say they'reready to do something or they want to they want to do it their way. Help steer them down your process because there's a reason for it. Helpthem understand that reason. Keep it, keep in control of it. Youneed to learn how to predict outcomes. You've got to learn how to respondto objections. You've got to learn how to respond to to different adversity withinyour sales your your sales engagement strategies and within your go to market strategies.If you can do these things, if you're tracking objections, if you're listeningto record it calls, if you're not taking advantage of services like outreach gonecourse. You know there's things that are providing unbelievable insight into conversational analytics andtactics. If you're not learning how to take advantage of those things, onceagain, your plane with difting stones, you're going to get out class.Then you can spot opportunities within those things. That leads me to my last pieceis don't be afraid to be different. Don't be afraid to stand out.Give these people a reason to notice you when you're working in something.You know, if you're sending an email and you're not getting a good response, take an opportunity to fix it and do something that's out. You know, I hate the term out of the box, so I'm going to saymeet out of the Taco, thinking just you use meet out of the TACO, thinking and and and stand out. You know, let them know you'rehere, let them know you have something valuable and do it in a waythat triggers a different pattern in your prospects brain, instead of you falling intothe same pattern of every single sales right they see day and day out.But them see you as something different and have fun while you're doing it.The only job in the world with you're you're in CEO, even if you'resomebodil. You are responsible for your in destiny. You can get up everysingle day and make an impact that can totally change your life. You candecide what you want to get paid, you can decide what hours you wantto work and you can openly decide how successful we are. You want tobe. So have fun doing it. I love it. I love it, I love it, and this is why we get along so well.Yeah, we share a lot of the the same looks on the the salesprofession and and life in general. Well, Adam, thank you so much forall the insight today. I really enjoyed this conversation. Excited to keepit going when we're in Sandy Earl and March, maybe over a few frostypints, but I will not say no to that. Perfect and everyone whojoined us, thank you so much for US spending the last forty five minuteswith us, and go out and crush...

...it this week. Thanks Everrah.This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. Join US at sales engagementcomfor new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement coming soon. Toget the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure to check outoutreach to I oh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on thenext episode.

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