The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

Direct Mail is the Hottest Way to Connect in B2B w/ Kris Rudeegraap

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

LinkedIn, email, phone calling— it’s all part of the normal B2B sales approach. Strength in various channels is simply table stakes. Breaking through the noise and offering a real relationship to buyers is the challenge every B2B salesperson faces.

Kris Rudeegraap received and sent plenty of the above in his decade in various sales positions in silicon valley. After 10 years in sales, he decided to challenge the communication norm and founded Sendoso, an integrated direct mail and gifting solution.

But don’t think annoying cable bill ads. Think more warm and fuzzy socks, fancy macaroons, and engraved wine bottles.

Kris hopped on our Sales Engagement podcast and delivered a powerful message on why direct mail isn’t just on a comeback, but it’s essential to your B2B sales program.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast.This podcast is brought to you by outreach dot ioh, the leading sales engagementplatform helping companies, sellers and customer success engaged with buyers and customers in themodern sales era. Check out sales engagementcom for new episodes resources in the bookon sales engagement coming soon. Now let's get into today's episode. Welcome backto another episode of the sales engagement podcast. I am your host, Jovi Nollo, senior content managing editor over outreach, and we have another phenomenal show today. We have Chris Rudy Grab, CEO, Co founder of Sendoso,a direct mail and engagement delivery platform. We use it over here and outreach. It's fantastic he's here to talk about a shift in how sellers engage withprospects and customers and the resurgence of direct mail, and a little bit abouthis background and how that's influenced how Sindoso...

...has been formed and how it operates. But before we get into the meat of the show, I'm going totoss it on over to Chris, who can introduce himself tell us a littlebit about his background and what he's doing over at Sendoso. Chris, thanksfor being on the show. Thank you. Thank you, Joe. Yes,a little background of myself. I was in sales for about a decadebefore starting Sendoso. Really saw a transformation and how kind of the sales landscapewas moving and saw that there is an interesting gap in the market to bringabout a new directmail and gifting platform, and so I quit my last jobas an account executive and started send Oh. So it's been an awesome ride sincenow. Tell us a little bit about this resurgence of direct mail andhow it's changing the way, especially in b tob situations, how sellers areengaging with prospects. I know that we use it a ton outreaching. Ithas been incredibly effective, but how is the shift come about and what doyou see it going? Yeah, I think there's an interesting transformation that we'reseeing with direct mail. One of the...

...biggest trends I see is just theaddition of technology and adding direct mail and gifting into your sales or MARTEX stack. And one of the things that I think is changed is that historically directmail has been a you know, fill out of spreadsheet once a month,once a quarter, marketing blasts it out, and now we're seeing that, youknow, str's a's even CSM's. With the usage of technology, you'redoing more real time direct mail the day before a meeting or top of funnel, as part of a sequence, and then once that direct mail hits,the next thing you're doing is, you know, doing an email or phonecall. So it's integrated into your outreach very well. So I think that'sone big shift. Also think companies are getting more creative and there's interesting thingspeople are sending out and now it's not as just you know, a lotof people think of direct mail as hey, you know, you know my cableprovider Send Me Post cards of the mail and that's what direct mail is. But I think we're seeing companies send out really creative of things, sendingout, you know, Cup k Ake,...

...sending out you know, all theseother different types of kind of tangible offline items that go above and beyonddirect mail. Yeah, I was going to ask you about that because traditionally, and you know, maybe a t shirt, branded t shirt of brainedwater bottle. That's that's kind of pass a at this point it's part ofthe noise. What are some of the direct mail offerings that you've seen sentthrough your platform that have really been like all right, that's pretty cool andthat's going to get a response. Yeah, so there's a couple categories of things. I think that when you're sending out we call them like consumables,it could be, you know, a thing of like mini cup cakes ormacaroons with your logo on it in a note. I think those often tendto do well at an office because they're they're very shared and give a lovelittle treats here and there. We've got a really cool Amazon integration that allowsyou to basically pick something from Amazon. It sends it through our Warehouse,includes a handwritten note and ships it off. And so we see strs doing theirtypical sales research. Like you know, before you reach out to somebody,you check their linkedin for their alma mater or seeing if they tweet aboutsome sports they love, and so leveraging...

...that and what they're sending out interms of their direct mail. I think the t shirts and things of thatnature and the swag stuff, I think it's still cool. I think we'rejust seeing people get higher quality, so more of quality or quantity, soinstead of just sending a, you know, five dollar, you know, oneoff random mug. Maybe they're sending like a nice yetti tumbler that wasmore expensive in something that someone's actually loving and keeping on their desk. Ithink that's an important distinction to make, is that this is like the definitionof personalization and high touch, right. So it kind of goes against someof the trends that we've seen in sales development and just selling in general lately, where it's just like, all right, I need a list of a hundredthousand names, I'm just going to blast thro them. This is like, okay, I'm going to identify my high value target counts and engage withthem in a very personalized way. Yeah, exactly. I think we also seea ton of companies using our platform for for printed in handwritten notes.And addition to that, when I think...

...something we're seeing again is people have, for the last decade, created really cool ebooks, white papers, casestudies, and a lot of it sits online and and it's companies are startingto take that back offline now and said mailing that out as part of theirsequences, which I think it's a great thing, where you know, there'sa little posted note that says, you know, hey, Jo, turnedto page to you know, I thought you'd like this, and it's justlike a nice touch in a, you know, larger sequence. And whydo you think this is gaining such a following and becoming so popular? Imean, your business is doing very well, you're expanding in the multiple states now, you have a lot of customers. Why is it resonating so much withcompanies who are trying to sell their products and people who are receiving thesethings? Yeah, I think there's a few things. I think one ishaving a strong on the channel. You know, email, offline, linkedinphone approach is just becoming the norm now. There's lots of noise and all thechannels, so you have to kind of break through and be effective ineach one. So I think that's key.

I think we're seeing millennials that areresponding well to direct mail and seeing that as a very cool thing thatthey're receiving, since I've really lived in the digital age since they're born,and so this is a nice kind of offline addition for them. You know, I think that with technology just makes it that much easier. I thinkhistorically, without a service like sod so you're spending hours of your time boxand things up and sending things out and you just don't have the time ofday to do it. You want to do it, you just don't havethe time. So we kind of enable you to do this special stuff andexecuted on it more at scale. Yeah, I mean you're totally right about thetime. Fact. They're my previous company. One day a week theCEOS significant other would come in and just stuff envelopes of Tshirts for three hoursday and then send that out and we wouldn't been able to do it otherwisebecause it is so time consuming to put together these things and send them outto your customers. So I think that's great that your platform saves that muchtime and allows for these sort of one to one interactions between between sellers andcompanies and prospects. That I think it's fantastic and it's really interesting. Youdidn't start out as a CEO of company...

...or anything. You started out asan ae right, and then you transition to what head of product and seeyou of this company. How is that influence how Sendosa is being run?Yeah, I think it is an interesting shift. I think a lot ofyou know Silk Valley startups, you know it's led by an engineering co founderor maybe ahead of product. You don't see as many a's or senior salesfolks get up and start companies. So I think for me it was justI saw such a need in the market and being within the startup environment forthe last decade, really saw that I wanted to make the shift and jumpin and it. What it did in the early days is it made iteasy for me to go after and get new customers because I was a nobrainer for me to start doing sales day zero. It also built a niceculture around sales and product really being close together. So those are kind ofmy two backgrounds. And being that this is a product that I would useor I use and I wanted to use before, and I know a lotof other sales people use it, gave...

...me some leverage there and expertise inbuilding out the product. And because of that I have a like weekly meetingsto sales team now, probably more so than most companies do, to reallyget a good grasp on what new features, what else is in the market,what else can we we build? And so we've been really product focusboth from the sales team's respective and the customer success side, but the scalesteam has been very crucial and continue to build on our road map and Ithink that shows just the level of adoption that you're probably seeing with with yourcustomers and once it gets into a company, how often reps choose to use theservice, like the indows that. I know that at outage everyone's intheir hand like we do. I can I get a seat? Can Ican? I? Yeah, yeah, it shows that you have a salesbackground and that's influencing the product a lot. Answer me this for the sales managersthat are listening right now. There's thinking, okay, this sounds great, it also sounds pretty expensive. How do I justify the probably a littlebit out of and expense, and then...

...how do I justify rolling that outto my entire team? Yeah, so you know, we've done a tonof our I case studies. A lot of our clients actually already are seeingthe value of directmail. So it's not really like proven the value. It'smore of like we are providing a more repeatable, operationalized process so that youknow that Friday afternoon the strs don't have to spend five hours you know,write in notes and packing boxes. So in a lot of cases it's like, holy cow, didn't know this tool even existed, that that allowed meto scale out what we wanted to do internally but never had the time for. So I think that what we're doing is almost like an obvious thing.Comanies are like, oh, that's something that is natural for building relationships.So a lot of be peeves of sales are already bought in day zero.Some of the things, though, that they we always get questions on andwe built features around, is like how do I make sure I don't getsome rogue str sending, you know, tenzero dollars this month? So we'vebuilt in a lot of budgeting restrictions, limitations. We even have hooks inthe like sales for some things in that nature. So you can set upvalidation rules like if this prospects not in...

...a certain stage, then don't allowand receive stuff, or, you know, if they're lead scores and equal tothis and they can't receive this nicer item. So you can make surethat there's some rules in place to make this more of budgeting and other thingsso that people don't go crazy with it. I like that. That's like thestories you see on the news where, like the kid gets the hold ofthe phone and orders like every video game on Amazon. You know,totally. That's fantastic. So do you consider a direct mail touch to belike a silver bullet when you pull that out during the buying process? Isit's something to get your foot in the door or is something to close thedeal? Yeah, so we see our customers doing it for both. Ithink we've seen customers have good success being kind of the top of the youknow, step one, two or are so in a sequence, and that'ssomething that can get get on their desk rather than may be in their inbox, and so it's something that's they can reference back to and a cold callor an email. You know, we...

...see that it also worked well anddeal acceleration as like a thank you for the demo and then that you sendthem a little, you know, swag bag or some other kind of sayingpost demo as a thank you to build rapport and then we're also seeing ahe's using it to kind of throughout the evaluation proposal process, and what's interestingabout that is, you know, rather than some a's just saying like hey, any updates on this? You know, sending out maybe another interesting case studythat could, in turn, provide us more value than just that.Hey, any updates? Email? I was a little bit unaware that notonly are you sending out things like cupcakes and Amazon gadgets and whatnot, butit's more of like printed out case studies in one cheets and dub I.I just didn't know that's that's you see that being utilized. Luck yeah,it's actually pretty interesting. You know, we've got probably a dozen different thingsthat you can send thro our platform. So again, I think the directmail name kind of limits some of people's creativity in terms of what they thinkwe can do. But you know, people are sending out bottles of winewith maybe an in graved logo on it,...

...or they're sending out, you know, these really cool socks that are custom or they're sending out, youknow, printed white papers with handwritten notes, or they're sending out these cupcakes,are cookies or racarons. The lists just kind of unlimited what you cando and what you can send, and so we're seeing that companies. Ialmost think that, you know, sales people are becoming mini marketers now ina way. You know, the best ones are kind of thinking outside thebox and come up with really creative not only things that they can send throughcheck mail, but also and just kind of their email and phone approach andhow that all comes together. I'm the channel for all you listeners out there. I'm totally down to receive engraved bottles of wine, any of those socks. I love the sock. It meets the socks, but I love thesock lot my way. Yeah, what size jacket do you want? APatagonia with a logo on it and all that kind stuff. You always getasked that. I have a Patagonia that I way around and everyone's asking likeHey, my I'm sized large, here's my address. When they get it. That's like gold around philoking valley right...

...total at agony with the logo.Yeah, Chris, if there was one thing that you wanted the listeners totake away from the conversation, what would that be? Yeah, I meanI think it's in terms of you know, what we're seeing and kind of myadvice is just I think direct mail is an awesome channel and something thatall companies should try, and I think that there's not one size fits all. But it's a great opportunity to connect with your buyers in a more meaningfulrelation and especially since you can integrated into outreach sequences. You know, itreally makes to that much of a more Integrated Act tool for your sales team. They're not necessarily learning something new, they're just having a new thing theycan click send on. Yeah, I think that's a good point, thatthis is about relationship building right, getting your customers, engaging your prospects.It's not transactional. Should be a real relationship and I think this is definitelysomething. Direct mail is definitely something that can establish that early on. Chris, if people want to get ahold of you, talk more about directmail.Talk more about Sindoso. How could they...

...do that? Yeah, go toour website. So dosocom you know. I can email me directly. It'sCrest Kris at. Send out SOCOM or. Then the San Francisco area was happyto grab coffee or beer. So Nice Nights. Well, we're recordingthis on a Friday, so the beer sounds pretty good. I'm staring outour kegreator right now. All Right, Chris. Well, thank you somuch for being on the show. Thank you to all the listeners. Weretuning in once again and we will see you next time on the sales engagementpodcast. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. Join US atsales engagementcom for new episodes, resources and the book on sales engagement coming soon. To get the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure tocheck out outreach dioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on thenext episode.

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