The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Intentional Presence: Communication Tips from a Communication Coach w/ Monique Russell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

People ask too many questions after your presentation, so you’re worried you didn’t communicate clearly.

You need a communication coach.

In this episode, I interview Monique Russell, Training & Communication Consultant at Clear Communication Solutions, about communication wins, fails, and top tips for intentional presence.

What we talked about:

— The most common areas Monique coaches on

— What most people overlook before addressing an audience

— Engaging the whole voice

— Intentional presence

Check out this resource we mentioned during the podcast: Monique is the author of Intentional Motherhood: Who Said It Would Be Easy

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Sales Engagement in your favorite podcast player.
 

He folks is under me, born now beforejumping in I've got to tell you about, I'm least two thousand and twenty oneon me. Eleven throughthe were focusing on how to win together in the new salesera. You'll learn now go to markes strategies get deeper. Finally, insidesand actial take wast for your entire or from revenue leaders at High Grosstartups and fortune five hundred companies and are very special guests,or none other than Guy Ras. The PODCAST ER author of how I built this and carryLawrence. The first female fider pilot in the US baby come saver seat for thishigh energy on mine, even at only stop out reached to io. Now, let's get intoit. Welcome to the sales engagement, apodcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagementplatform and they just launched out reach on our reach. The place to learnhow out reach well does not reach learn how the team follows up with every leadin record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can alsosee how out rewins account based plays, manages reps and so much more usingtheir own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulledfrom out reach processes and customer base when you're done you'll be able todo it as good as they do had the outreached on io son out reach to seewhat they have going on now, let's get into the day's episode, well hello,everyone and welcome to the sales engagement podcast. My name is brickBacheta from out reach, and I'm joined here by Monique Russell from clearcommunication solutions, and today we're going to be talking about acouple of things, may communication and just self development, and I'm soexcited to have ony care she's. Just coming off recently publishing her bookcalled Intentional Motherhood. We got a lot of topics to cover so one. Whydon't we just start with? What's about you? How did you get into the role thatyou're in and maybe give the audience a brief taste of what it is that you workon sure so today, clear communication solutions is a training, coaching andconsulting firm that focuses on...

...communication skills, just what thename says a right and so how we deliver the services. We do it through one onone private, Coaching Through Group, coaching through workshops andcorporate organizations and spaces, of course keynote events, because this iswhat I've been doing for a very long time, but I didn't automatically startthis way. So when I graduated from college, I left with three degrees inthe science of communications, and I thought that I was going to betraveling around the world covering investigative stories and report. Ilove that yeah and it didn't work out that way brook so after I tried toapply for, like hundreds and hundreds of jobs in the media space. What I wasreturning or being received with was definitely something I couldn't startmy professional journey with, and so I started in executive support and thatgave me a behind the scenes day today. Hands on practical training of whatmade leaders tick, what made them respected what they struggled with. Imean, after all, I was in the communication space, so I was justtaking it all in volunteering, helping themselves these complex peopleproblems and wouldn't you know later on, I started my company. Istarted free lancing. I was doing everything under the sun incommunications that didn't work. I learned a lot of lessons like what Iliked what I didn't like what I should focus on, and I will tell you where Iam today- has been definitely a journey, but communication skills developmenthas been something that's been in me since I was eight years old, which iswhen I started actually speaking in front of audiences, really the hundredm. How? But speaking at age, eight tell me more. Oh my Gosh! Well, you know Igrew up in the church, so you know the church was a thing where audienceswould combine and we would do presentations. Then, when I was inelementary school, I would often do the...

...mistress of ceremonies for the events,and I would do you know we would have mass every week and any time there wasanything going on. I had a teacher who actually I was her favorite, and so shewould always put the everything together and she would say, monicasgoing to be the hostess and so literally in Fourth and fifth and sixthgrade, I developed so much speaking time infront of adults in front of the school leaders, and then I got into performingarts and that took me straight into high school. I was on the nationaldebate team and you know it was just a natural progression for me. Yeah, youfound your niche, and you mentioned just a minute ago, likefree lancing gives you the opportunity to do a little bit of everything, butyou realize it didn't really work for you and you're able to refine into whatyou liked and were good at I. What was that experience like like give us somecontext around, like the wide array of things that you might have been doingas a freelancer, oh yeah. So if it's sounded or smell like communication, Iwould do it. I would say yes, that's what I do. That's what I do so, forexample, editing I would take on editing projects and then I in thebeginning, I would do editing and not realizing that the client didn'tunderstand their different levels of editing right, so you're editing onefor the context in flow. You may go back in your editing for grammar andyou know, then your edit thing for continuity when you're going throughyour story or your elements, and so that was like. Okay, I'm not I'm notdoing this. This is not something that I not something that I want to do and Irespect the hustle though, where you're like give me it don't try it. I wasdoing everything brook so I was doing editing. I was doing PR and marketing.I was doing teaching and teaching communication skills, anything thatthey that they said they wanted. I...

...would pretty much say yeah. I could dothat. That's no problem and so doing that I actually taken on the marketingprojects. Like I don't today, I don't do marketing I mean I got governmentcontracts through marketing and PR opportunities, but I don't do that inmy practice at all. Today I have the skill. I have the expertise and I haveenough now how now now now to know that it's not really something that I wantto lead with. Though I can guide my clients existing clients right nowthrough the those types of decisions. It's not something that I offer yeah,it's just not something that I do were also sorry, I'm sure you just saw mygiant dog behind me on the ear. Apologies. If there are other dogs,were my partners around he as are working from home, we love it. We Love! Oh, yes, yes! Well,that's awesome that you're able to refine it, and- and now I mean you arerelating to your communications, firm, you focusing on professionaldevelopment and presentation. What are some of the most common areas thatyou're asked to coach on these days. I've got a breath of experience yeah.What are you? What are you focusing on now with clients yeah most people whenthey come to me? They are looking for some very specific skills they want tostrengthen and those are usually the first, the top level skills, and thenwe get into the underlying. What's the real challenge here, so top levelskills were looking for how to gain by it, they want to be able to berelatable to their clients to their leaders at work. They want to make surethat they're messaging for the presentations is clear when they arefeeling like. Maybe okay, I'm not getting any feedback when I'm givingthe presentation or the feedback. Is that I'm getting a lot of questionsabout what I am presenting, and so sometimes that's interpreted as yourpresentation wasn't good, because I'm getting a lot of challenging questions,not knowing how to handle those unanticipated questions and not knowinghow to perceive that type of question.

So I'm getting asked a lot aroundpresentation skills how to increase the visibility, whether it's it for abusiness owner who wants to increase visibility or someone who's in theircorporate role, and they want to become more visible, using communicationskills, building their network, increasing their brand influence andimpact, but a lot of times those type of coaching cut topics. They come witha need for the self awareness, emotional intelligence, confidencebuilding peace as well. But nobody really, I would say nobody really don'tknow. Let me take that back because in the last year year and a half I wouldsay people would come and they would say I need emotional intelligence. Ineed a confidence building yes, but prior to it, most people would oftenlead with. I want to be seen. I want to have more impact. I want to make mypresentations more clear, but now we're getting more aware into what's actuallydriving some of those skills to yeah, and it's so interesting. Youbring that up, because I find that there's not a lot ofcoaching in your day, job of like how to make a great presentation you justend up doing it over and over again trying to figure it out. So I applaudthose who are investing in themselves say like hey here's, an area ofopportunity. Out of curiosity, you find that there is like A. I don't know. I M not a list oflike no nose but things that people commonly do that are quick fixes andlike okay, you're, making this mistake or that you're presenting yourself thiswhen like we can turn that around. I guess quick tips or, Oh, my God, thebiggest one is people, don't know, know their audience they're there talkingabout what they want to say. This is what I want to say. This is what theyneed to hear and as opposed to putting their audience in the driver, seat andthinking through Strategicallye what...

...they need to hear like that blending.That portion is the the biggest gap. It is the biggest gap when you are makinga presentation, even just in a sales conversation. You have in your mind, Igot to get this out. I got to get this out. This is what I want to say. Thisis the time I have but you're not being aware of the person on the other side,what, where they're at really, and so when you're doing a presentation, Iwould say if we were comparing it to. I don't know a sales conversation withyour sales conversation. You have a little bit more time to do someresearch and you research, the person that you're talking to you, try to seewhere you can get rapport and familiarity, and things like that. Butwhen you're doing that, public speaking presentation or just a presentation atwork a lot of times, people don't do that research and that's important. Youknow that is. That is important, so I would say a big. No, no is research,your audience give them what they need in the way they need it best, not whatyou think they need to hear and how, how it's most comfortable for you andthen just making sure that you have relatable connecting pieces so that youcan be telling the message and multiple ways: people learn in multiple ways youhave to give analogies. You have to use story, telling techniques andstrategies. This is how things a stick, so I would say those are two like rightoff the top things that people can focus on to make sure that theirpresentations come off better yeah. So true- and we talked about thata lot in that SCR like outbound sales org that I work with, as you can do allthe research in the world. But if you don't have a transition or, like yousaid, if you're not putting it in a frame that makes sense to your prospect,it's all for not or if you're, giving the same scripted pitch over and overagain it's just it's going to fall flat for sure or even if you can't bounceback so you're. So regimented and so...

...prepared that you start off with thatscript, and then that person says something and you're like you'recontinuing going with the script like you didn't pick up that there was aclue right there for you to pivot and be in the moment you just focusing on.I got to do one two three. You Know Yeah Yeah. I then you're askingquestions and doing things for you, like you, said, I'm not through them,the other end of the phone and now that we're all we're over a year intoworking remote, which is wild to flies, and we all had to learn how to get nextremotely and do this thing over zoom, where we're trying to build her with acomputer right. What are some of the ways that your healthing folks bridgethe gap between screens with their prospects at the sub, difficult hmmm? So in addition to some of the you know,basic skills, development in terms of making sure your presentation andeverything is okay, I would say technical, wise. One area that I amencouraging people in is to leverage the full, vocal variety of their voice.The voice is something that, if you don't have an opportunity to see peopleface to face, the voice is something that can keep us very intrigued orengage. I can tell a lot you know about what we're feeling. So, if you thinkabout the radio stations in the past or people who are even listening to thispodcast and you are you're telling your story you're using pauses, for example-and you when you use a pause you're, giving that person time to processyou're, also taking into consideration that a lot of times our Internet maynot be as strong at certain times. You know and so you're, giving that thattransmission time to get where it needs to go. Have that person think aboutwhat you've said and you're using your full, vocal variety? If you're stayingin this monotone tone, then they're...

...going to fall asleep. But if you usethe full variety of your voice, you're going to get to another level ofengagement, yeah, yeah, so important, and your trying to keep it lively rightand be creative in the way that you are engaging with folks. And you talk a lotabout creativity and presentations. What are some ways that you think folkscan break out of the mole without appearing Gimmick y? You know like it'simportant, to keep books engaged and be on the cutting edge of things, but toomuch. I find that I can kind of detract from your presentation. So what are youseeing in the market today? So it's not even about like the quantity. This iswhat I would say to that. So it's not about quantity, it's really about thequality of the creativity. So if you're meeting, for example, what I'm seeingis people would send you know like a box or gift box ahead of time. If theyknow that they're not able to meet in person, they may send a gift box orthey may oh W. I saw one lady she did this. She said: okay, what's yourfavorite coffee place, local coffee place and she sent a coffee just intime for what our meeting yeah so lover exactly, and so it's like these. Thereare so many different things that you can do that t take the connection toanother level and it's not about how much it's really about the very smallinteractive, thoughtful ways of being creative to connect. If you're doing apresentation, I know some people they want to use every tool available as away to say they're being engaged. Let's do a pole. Let's do a breakout room.Let's do we'll wipe for it. Let's do you know all these transitions on thepower point slides and it's not about quantity. It's really about thatquality. You can use one of those technical tools and have a really goodoutcome. But again the key is not just doing it for doing sake, but to reallythink through the intention of the...

...meeting intention of the person, theoutcome and then use in the creative aspect to make sure that thatconversation is rewarding for both parties m yeah. And here when you talkabout creativity, you're right, it is just about being intentional and fullyengaged in the conversation and what are some ways that you I mean ceoucompany, you're running a bunch of meetings. I made your back to back alot of folks. Can you know empathize with the back to magazine meetings andwhen you're doing that it can be really difficult to could be present for yournext one? So what are some ways that you, like, I guess, ground yourself orrecenter, so that you can be creative and reactive, and you know engagingwith your prospects and clients. Yeah so, first and foremost is to have acoach, so I have a coach so that I don't have those back back to back toback all the time I have white space in between my calendar, because that'salso another indication of where we're struggling and so as a communicationscoach, focusing on self awareness and emotional intelligence. I know howdifficult it can get because trust me without intention. I would be consistently working fromseven in the morning to ten at night with m. You know eating at my beststanding up in between it's easy. It's so easy for us to do this. So without that intention. So I have acoach that helps me to keep be accountable to the things that I thelife, that I want to live and the integration of my work some weeks.Obviously, if we are having a lot of projects, it's going to be heavier thannormal, and you just do that what you have to do and then other weeks we havemore space in between to actually take a breather, and you know work on thethings that we need to work on in...

...between the client facing meetings. SoI would say make sure that you are not just relying on yourself or if you havea team, you know get into a community, because when you share these strategiesto help, you become more efficient, you're, more likely to actuallyimplement them. If you are very good with the self motivation I mean, andyou are focused on habit building and sustaining really good habits for youto be efficient in your work, then Curos, but I always say community isimportant. We're not islands. Sales is a tough role. It's a tough tough job,and you know just having that connection with others is very helpfulin maintaining the creativity and keeping that integration for your workin life. Yeah and that's you know talking about intention and balance, isa great segue because, in addition to running your own company, you gotanother huge job and that's as a parent. I'm thinking about your book that youjust published Intentional Motherhood, who said it would be easy which, by theway, did you say you started that in November and you just published in thisyear I dished I did I did I had to get going. I had to get going yeah. It's superimpressive and one thing that you mention in the book. I can gratin onpublishing it. It's just the importance of having a vision and hearing you talkabout. It is important to take some break so that you can be intentionalwith your plan and not feel like you're getting pulled in a bunch of differentdirections, and you know having a vision for how you want things to go. Iknow in your book you mentioned. We have visions and default for a lot ofthings, but for parenting you know it's like one day, you're, not a parent andthen the next day, even though you've been preparing ylike okay, I have thishuge job ahead of me and I'm not sure what to do, and I don't have a lot ofdefault. Could you expand on what you mean by like not having the defaulterthe vision, just a bit more yeah, so exactly when we are preparing for ourjobs or we're preparing for the career that we w want, we have a very clearoutline or a target of what we want to...

...achieve and who we want to be in thatprocess. If we are thinking about going to college and getting a degree in lawor getting a degree in pharmaceutical science, we know what that looks likefor us. We know what classes we're going to take. We know if we're goingto show up to class with that looks like, and you know, studying and allthat stuff, and if we look at even just our vacations, we have a plan. We say:okay, we're going to go to this restaurant. We're going to you know,lay on the beach this day or go on this tour, and so we itemize an outline orhave a vision for the things that are important to us. But when it comes toparenting most of the time we don't we simply step into that role and weoperate from whatever society defaults for us as parents, we operate from aplace where, especially as mom's intentional motherhood, the book is allabout not just running that race from a default place. Thinking that you haveto keep up with everything, because then that's when the guilt sets inthat's when you feel like okay, I can't keep up with my job and keep up with mykids and I'm not a good mom and I'm failing at this, and this is where thatoverwhelm comes in. But if we really stop and say: Okay, guess what now wehave taken on a new role? The same way you would take on a new roll in yourcompany and you would sit down and you think, okay, what's my plan for thenext three months, how am I going to get into this understanding of thesekey concepts if we were to sit down and really think about? What now does thisvision look like for us as parents as mothers? What is our motherhood,identity or parenting identity? How will we show up? What does success looklike for us, not the success from the General Default of society? So whatdoes that look like? I have a colleague who she works two days a week, she's amom. She works two days a week and that...

...two days a week that she works is morethan enough for her to have a very fulfilling life because she's verystrategic. But she sat down and thought about that, and I will tell you somepeople do give their unsolicited opinion to her and about what she'sdoing and all this other stuff, but to really think about what that looks likefor you think about what it looks like for you when you're raising yourchildren. If you're choosing like me, if you did homeschool I home schooledfor five years, so would that look like and once you have that vision foryourself, then, when those unsolicited opinions come and when those comments come you're, not taking themin on as your identity and feeling guilty or feeling overwhelm, becauseyou've already worked towards your vision, you've already worked towardsthat. So, if you are in your college role and someone says okay, you'reyou're going to medical school and it's taking eight years, why are you doingthat you're wasting time? Yeah? Ah, that's good! I know what I'm doing I'mon my track. You know so you it's not going to shake you because you havealready created a plan for yourself. So that's really what I mean when I sayburning into the motherhood identity. Creating a vision for yourself,parenting vision for yourself yeah, and it's so important, like you mentioned,for parenting or anything else in your life, to have the clear idea of whatsuccess needs to you, and that seems to be the common threat around highlysuccessful people of it's, not tunnel vision but you're right. They have anidea like what it is that they're striving for, so that one thing's comeup or when things don't go as expected, it's not throwing them totally offcourse. It's just kind of like veering around a speed bump and then continuingon your path so yeah. I love what you had to say about that and another topicyou broach in your book is just the importance of moving from just doing tobeing and again the back to back the...

...juggling multiple job, the wearing alot of hats. It can be really easy to get caught up in the whirlwind. So whatare some ways that you focus on just being whether that's as a mother orwhen you're at work or just the being present MMMM presence is so important.So I would say for me I mean I start with the physical.I start with physical distraction, so you know I could go down rabbit holeseasily. Brook I mean trust me. Everything in my book is from PersonalExperience and or my coaching experience. So like the guilt and allthat stuff I had it, I had it. I have gone through it. I didn't have thatvision. I created the vision, and so everything that I'm talking about is isnot something that I've read in a text book, but I've written it in my ownbook. Actually so I love it, but I start with a physical environment.Your physical environment is a great indication indicator of how you can bein a doo mode rather than a b mode, and so I look at physical distractions. Iremove clutter, I put like plans and different things in my environment thatwill help me to be present and focus when I'm connecting with other peopleand then, as far as like that mental presence, I make sure that I am notdoing back to back to back to factor back meetings because it really doesn'tgive me time to prepare, even if I have ten minutes before another meeting tento fifteen minutes before another meeting, it's a great booster, and soit gives you a down time. You can shift your energy, you can come and beprepared close out all of the browsers. I know this is people who are listeningto this when they're like already having heart capitation, because I goton so many Tansee. That is a distraction meter. Your meter is highif you have over two taps open and so...

...really trying to use those techniqueslike keeping the tabs down to a minimum of two so that you can be focused andbe present. Turning off the notifications and then, as far as theemotional presence is there, I make sure that I journal. I Journal a lot.That's something that I've been doing ever since I was a little girl, and soI journal so that if there is anything that is blocking that's coming up thatI'm paying attention to, I can address it and not bring that transference tosomebody else's meeting or somebody else's connection with me because itdoes carry on you know you have a bad, a bad encounter. It knocks you off, youknow for a little bit and then you go into the next one. Okay, thinking, okay,what's this what's going to happen here, you know, so I make sure that I taketime to actually just bull it out real quick. What happened when did I startto feel uncomfortable? What was said specifically, you know, and then I Icleared that out and move and move on. Oh, I love that. I think that's a greatidea and you're doing that in between or just like throughout the day. Well,if it bothers me, I mean because sometimes, if something is botheringyou you, you can start your day in a fabulous state. A lot of people don't,but I am intentional about starting my date and filling my cup up, but if youcan start your day and then in thirty minutes something can happen and youcan have a shift in your mood and you can feel like it's like blocking youfrom from making your next call or doing the next proposal or you knowwhatever it is, but it's okay to pay attention to it. And if I feel likeit's just I'm feeling I will just put out mylittle paper quickly identify okay. What was it that was said that shiftedthis this feeling for me right did, I feel, like I wasn't as prepared did Ifeel embarrassed was I was that I feel...

...insulted like what was it because therehad to have been something you know right was the person who who's on theother end, not paying attention and I'm talking and they're doing eh billionthings or whatever, like whatever it? Is I'm just making these examples up,and so I just kind of get in touch with with that really quickly and he andwork through that and then move on like that's. That's a solid methodology clarout blocks in your in your connection, process, yeah yeah such great advice. Iam enlightened and inspired after our conversation here today Monique andtell us where and listeners if they want a bit more of this work and theyfind your new book, Intentional Motherhood. Yes, you know it's onAmaotome, you could get a com, but you could also get it from me. Guess whatthere's a link on my linked in profile? And so, if you want to personalize copyan go to my linkin profile, get it and it will be in the mail to you. Oh mygosh. I love it all right, so Monique Russell Clear Communications on link inlook her up. Folks, if you haven't already and one last question for truckfor you for funds before we were at but when the pandemic is like over over,we've got the light at the end of the tunnel, but when we were hopefullyquote back to normal, what activity are you most excited about? WHOA? Well, Ihave been living my life, so my life is not stopped because of a pandemic. I still connect with people. I guess, but let me see, because Ithink I know exactly what you're saying. So, if there's anything that I wouldsay, I'm looking forward to it would be much more travel because travel issomething that I love. Absolutely love Love La love doing, and so that wouldbe the thing once things are okay, because I actually I haven'ttraveled ever since it startd so jam, I...

...miss being on airplanes, who would havewould have thought that you'd say now. I I O my I said: Listen Dehydration! Imiss it. The De Hindai! Oh Brook. I don't miss that, but I definitely want to go watch thosemovies on the airplane with those long lights. Absolutely it's some ten time M.Well, when you thank you again, everybody be sure to check her out CEO,author, mother, Moni Brussel and like tenacle r communication solutions, andthank you. I have a great rest of your deck. Thank you to brick. This was another episode of the SalesEngagement podcast to help this get in front of more eyes and ears. Pleaseleave us a shining five star review join us at sales engagement com for newepisodes, resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out ofyour sales engagement strategy, make sure to check out out reached Io. Theleading sales engagement platform see you on the next episode a.

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