The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Intentional Presence: Communication Tips from a Communication Coach w/ Monique Russell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

People ask too many questions after your presentation, so you’re worried you didn’t communicate clearly.

You need a communication coach.

In this episode, I interview Monique Russell, Training & Communication Consultant at Clear Communication Solutions, about communication wins, fails, and top tips for intentional presence.

What we talked about:

— The most common areas Monique coaches on

— What most people overlook before addressing an audience

— Engaging the whole voice

— Intentional presence

Check out this resource we mentioned during the podcast: Monique is the author of Intentional Motherhood: Who Said It Would Be Easy

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Sales Engagement in your favorite podcast player.
 

Hey folks, it's under me born. Now, before jumping in, I've got to tell you about on least two thousand and twenty one, on May eleven through thirteen, were focusing on how to win together in the new sales era. You'll learn new go to market strategies, get deeper funnel insides and actional takeaways for your entire org from revenue leaders, Highgro startups and fortune five hundred companies and are very special guests or none other than Guy Raz the podcaster and author of how I built this and carry lawns, the first female fighter pilot in the US Navy. Come Save Your seat for this high energy online event at only stock outreach. That I oh. Now let's get into it. Welcome to the sales engagement a podcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, and they just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach. Well does outreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead in record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see how outreach one's account based plays, manages reps and so much more using their own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as they do. Head to outreach, Doo on outreach to see what they have going on. Now let's get into today's episode. Well, hello everyone and welcome to the sales engagement podcast. My name is brick Bachesta from outreach and I'm joined here by Monique Russell from clear communication solutions, and today we're going to be talking about a couple of things in the communication and just selfdevelopment, and I'm so excited to have money here. She just coming off recently publishing her book called Intentional Motherhood. We got a lot of topics to cover the money. Why don't we just start now? It's about you. How did you get into the role that you're in, and maybe give the audience a group taste of what it is that you work sure so. Today, clear communication solutions is a training, coaching...

...and consulting firm that focuses on communication skills. Just with the name says they're right. And so how we deliver the services? We do it through one on one private coaching, through group coaching, through workshops and corporate organizations and spaces. Of course, keynote events because this is what I've been doing for a very long time. But I didn't automatically start this way. So when I graduated from college, I left with three degrees in the science of communications and I thought that I was going to be traveling around the world covering investigative stories and report. I love that. Yeah, and it didn't work out that way, Brook. So, after I tried to apply for like hundreds and hundreds of jobs in the media space, what I was returning or being received with was definitely something I couldn't start my professional journey with, and so I started in executive support and that gave me a be hind the scenes daytoday, hands on practical training of what made leaders tick, what made them respected, what they struggled with. I mean, after all, I was in the communication space, so I was just taking it all in, volunteering, helping themselves. These complex people problems. And wouldn't you know, later on I started my company, I started freelancing, I was doing everything under the sun in communications. That didn't work. I learned a lot lessons, like what I liked, what I didn't like, what I should focus on and I will tell you where I am today. Has Been definitely a journey. But communication skills development has been something that's been in me since I was eight years old, which is when I started actually speaking in front of audiences. Really a hundred MMM how much speaking at age eight? Tell me more. Oh my gosh. Well, you know, I grew up in the church. So, you know, the church was a thing where audiences would combine and we would do presentations. Then when I was in elementary school, I would often do the mistress of ceremonies for the events and I would do you...

...know, we would have mass every week and anytime there was anything going on, I had a teacher who actually I was her favorite, and so she would always put the everything together and she would say monique is going to be the hostess. And so literally in fourth and fifth and sixth grade I develop. I loved so much speaking time in front of adults, in front of the school leaders, and then I got into performing arts and that took me straight into high school. I was on the national debate team and you know, it was just a natural progression for me. Yeah, you found your niche and you mentioned just a minute ago like freelancing gives you the opportunity to do a little bit of everything where you realize it didn't really work for you and you're able to refine into what you liked and we're good at what was that experience like? Like? Give us some context around like the wide array of things that you might have been doing as a freelancer. Oh yeah, so if its sounded or smelt like communication, I would do it. I would say yes, I that's what I do, that's what I do. So, for example, editing, my would take on editing projects and then I in the beginning, I would do editing and not realizing that the client didn't understand their different levels of editing. Right. So you're editing one for the context and flow. You may go back and you're editing for grammar and you know, then you're editing for continuity when you're going through your story or your elements. And so that was like, okay, I'm not, I'm not doing this, this is not something that I not something that I want to do. Respect the hustle, though, where you're like GIV me it, don't try it. I was doing everything brook. So I was doing editing, I was doing PR and marketing, I was doing teaching and teaching communication skills. Anything that they that they said they wanted, I would pretty...

...much say, yeah, I could do that, that's no problem. And so doing that, actually taken on the marketing projects, like I don't today. I don't do marketing. I mean I got government contracts through marketing and PR opportunities, but I don't do that in my practice at all today. I have the skill, I have the expertise and I have enough know how. No, no, now to know that it's not really something that I want to lead with. Though I can guide my clients, existing clients right now, through their those types of decisions, it's not something that I offer. Yeah, it's just not something that I do. They're also sorry, I'm sure you just some my giant dog, but behind me on this bear apologies if there are other dog were my partners around? Yours are working from home. We love it. We Love Oh, yes, yes, well, that's awesome that you're able to refine it. And now, I mean you were relating to your communications firm focusing on professional development and presentation. What are some of the most common areas that you're asked to coach on these days? We've got a breath of experience. Yeah, what are your what are you focusing on now with clients? Yeah, most people when they come to me, they are looking for some very specific skills they want to strengthen, and those are usually the first the top level skills, and then we get into the underlying what's the real challenge here? So top level skills. Were looking for how to gain by it. They want to be able to be relatable to their clients, to their leaders at work. They want to make sure that their messaging for their presentations is clear when they are feeling like maybe, okay, I'm not getting any feedback when I'm giving the presentation, or the feedback is that I'm getting a lot of questions about what I am presenting, and so sometimes that's interpreted as your presentation wasn't good, because I'm getting a lot of challenging questions, not knowing how to handle those unanticipated questions and not knowing how to perceive that type of question. So I'm getting asked a...

...lot around presentation skills, how to increase the visibility, whether it's it for a business owner who wants to increase visibility or someone who's in their corporate role and they want to become more visible using communication skills, building their network, increasing their brand influence and impact. But a lot of times those type of coaching cut topics. They come with a need for the self awareness, emotional intelligence, confidence building piece as well, but nobody really. I would say nobody really. I'll no, let me take that back, because in the last year, year and a half, I would say, people would come and they would say I need emotional intelligence, I need confidence building. Yes, but prior to it most people would often lead with I want to be seen, I want to have more impact, I want to make my presentations more clear. But now we're getting more aware into what's actually driving some of those skills too. Yeah, and it's so interesting to bring that up because I find that there's not a lot of coaching and your day job of like how to make a great presentation. You just end up doing it over and over again, trying to figure it out. So I applaud those who are investing in themselves say like Hey, here's an area of opportunity. Out of curiosity. You find that there is like a I don't know, I'm not a list of like no knows, but things that people commonly do that are quick fixes and like, okay, you're making this mistake or that you're presenting yourself this way, like we can turn that around, I guess, quick tips. Oh my God. The biggest one is people don't know their audience. They're they're talking about what they want to say, this is what I want to say, this is what they need to hear, and as opposed to putting their audience in the driver's seat and thinking through strategically what they need...

...to hear like that, blending that portion is the the biggest gap. It is the biggest gap when you are making a presentation, even just in a sales conversation. You have in your mind I got to get this out, I got to get this out, this is what I want to say, this is the time I have. But you're not being aware of the person on the other side, what where they're at really, and so when you're doing a presentation, I would say if we were comparing it to, I don't know, a sales conversation, with your sales conversation, you have a little bit more time to do some research and you research the person that you're talking to. You try to see where you can get rapport and familiarity and things like that, but when you're doing that public speaking presentation or just a presentation at work, a lot of times people don't do that research and that's important. You know that is that is important. So I would say a big no no is research your audience. Give them what they need in the way they need it best, not what you think they need to to hear and how, how it's most comfortable for you, and then just making sure that you have relatable connecting pieces so that you can be telling the message and multiple ways. People learn in multiple ways. You have to give analogies, you have to use storytelling techniques and strategies. This is how things a stick. So I would say those are two, like write off the top things that people can focus on to make sure that their presentations come off better. Yeah, so true, and we talked about a lot, and that str like outbound sales or that I work with, and you can do all the research in the world, but if you don't have a transition or, like you said, if you're not putting it in a frame that makes sense to your prospect it's all for not or if you're giving the same scripted pitch over and over again, it's just it's gonna fall flat for sure, or even if you can't bounce back. So you're so regimented and so prepared that you...

...start off with that script and then that person says something and you're like, you're continuing going with the script, like you didn't pick up that there was a clue right there for you to pivot and be in the moment. You just focusing on I got to do one, two, three, you know. Yeah, yeah, and then you're asking questions and doing things for you, like you said, and not for them the other end of the thumb. And now that we're all we're over here into working remote, which is wild flies, and we all had to learn how to connect remotely and do this thing over zoom where we're trying to build her with a computer. Right. What are some of the ways that you're helping folks bridge the gap between screens with their prospects? It is so difficult. MMM. So, in addition to some of the you know, basic skills development in terms of making sure your presentation and everything is okay, I would say technical wise, one area that I am encouraging people in is to leverage the full vocal variety of their voice. The voice is something that, if you don't have an opportunity to see people facetoface, the voice is something that can keep us very intrigued or engage can tell a lot, you know, about what we're feeling. So, if you think about the radio stations in the past or people who are even listening to this podcast, and you are, you're telling your story. You're using pauses, for example, and you when you use a pause, you're giving that person time to process. You're also taking into consideration that a lot of times our Internet may not be as strong at certain times, you know, and so you're giving that that transmission time to get where it needs to go. Have that person think about what you've said and you're using your full vocal variety. If you're staying in this monotone tone, then they're going to fall asleep, but if you use the full variety of your voice,...

...you're going to get to another level of engagement. Yeah, yeah, so important. And you're trying to keep it lively, right and be creative and the way that you are engaging with folks. You talk a lot about creativity and presentations. What are some ways that you think folks can break out of the mold without appearing gimmicky, you know, like it's important to keep folks engage and be on the cutting edge of things, but too much, I find that kind of detract from your presentation. So what do you see in in the market today? So it's not even about like the quantity. This is what I would say to that. So it's not about quantity, it's really about the quality of the creativity. So if you're meeting, for example, what I'm seeing is people would send, you know, like a box or gift box ahead of time. If they know that they're not able to meet in person, they may send a gift box or they may Oh, I saw one lady she did this. She said, okay, what's your favorite coffee place? Local coffee place, and she sent a coffee just in time for why? Our meeting? Yeah, so over exactly. And so it's like these. There are so many different things that you can do that take take the connection to another level and it's not about how much, it's really about the very small, interactive, thoughtful ways of being creative to connect. If you're doing a presentation, I know some people they want to use every tool available as a way to say they're being engaged. Let's do a pole, let's do a breakout room, let's do a white board, let's do, you know, all these transitions on the powerpoint slides. And it's not about quantity, it's really about that quality. You can use one of those technical tools and have a really good outcome. But again, the key is not just doing it for doing sake, but to really think through...

...the intention of the meeting, intention of the person that outcome and then using the creative aspect to make sure that that conversation is rewarding for both parties. Yeah, and here when you talk about creativity, you're right. It's just about being intentional and for fully engaged in the conversation. And what are some ways that you, I mean see of your company. You're running a bunch of meetings. I'm have your backtoback. A lot of folks can, you know, emphasize with the backtobag zoom meetings, and when you're doing that it can be really difficult to be present for your next one. So what are some ways that you like, I guess, ground yourself or recenter so that you can be creative and reactive and engaging with your prospects and clients. Yeah, so first and foremost is to have a coach. So I have a coach so that I don't have those backto backtobacktoback all the time. I have white space in between my calendar because that's also another indication of where we're struggling. And so, as a communications coach focusing on self awareness and emotional intelligence, I know how difficult it can get because, trust me, without intention I would be consistently working from seven in the morning to ten at night, with, you know, eating at my desk, standing up in between. It's easy. It's so easy for us to do this so without that intention. So I have a coach that helps me to keep the accountable to the things that I the life that I want to live and the integration of my work. Some weeks, obviously, if we are having a lot of projects, it's going to be heavier than normal and you just do that, what you have to do, and then other weeks we have more space in between to actually take a breather and, you know, work on the things that we need to work on in between the client facing meetings. So I would...

...say make sure that you are not just relying on yourself or if you have a team, you know, get into a community, because when you share these strategies to help you become more efficient, you're more likely to actually implement them. If you are very good with the self motivation, I mean, and you are focus on habit building and sustaining really good habits for you to be efficient in your work, then Kulos. But I always say community is important. We're not islands. Sales is a tough role, it's a tough, tough job and you know, just having that connection with others is very helpful in maintaining the creativity and keeping that integration for your work in life. Yeah, and that's, you know, talking about intension and downs. It's a great segue because in addition to running your own company, you got another huge job, and that's as a parent. I'm thinking about your book that you just published in Pensitional Motherhood. WHO said it would be easy? Which, by the way, did you say? You started that in November and you just published in this year. I did, I did, I did, I had to get going, I had to get going. Yeah, super impressive and one thing that you mentioned in the book, and congrats again on publishing it. It's just the importance of having a vision and, hearing you talk about it is important to take some break so that you can be attentional with your plan and not feel like you're getting pulled in a bunch of different directions and, you know, having a vision for how you want things to go. I know you in your book you mentioned we have visions and defaults for a lot of things, but preparenting, you know it's like one day you're not a parent and then the next day, even though you've been preparing really okay, I have this huge job ahead of me and I'm not sure what to do and I don't have a lot of defaults. Could you expand on what you mean by like not having the default or the vision just a bit more? Yeah, so, exactly when we are preparing for our jobs or we're preparing for the career that we want, we have a very...

...clear outline or a target of what we want to achieve and who we want to be in that process. If we are thinking about going to college and getting a degree in law or getting a degree in pharmaceutical science, we know what that looks like for us. We know what classes we're going to take. We know if we're going to show up to class with that looks like, and you know, studying and all that stuff. And if we look at even just our vacations, we have a plan. We say, okay, we're going to go to this restaurant, we're gonna, you know, lay on the beach this day or go on this tour, and so we itemize an outline or have a vision for the things that are important to us. But when it comes to parenting, most of the time we don't. We simply step into that role and we operate from whatever society defaults for us as parents. We operate from a place where, especially as mom's intentional motherhood, the book is all about not just running that race from a default place, thinking that you have to keep up with everything, because then that's when the guilt sets in, that's when you feel like, okay, I can't keep up with my job and keep up with my kids and I'm not a good mom and I'm failing at this, and this is where that overwhelm comes in. But if we really stop and say, okay, guess what now we have taken on a new role, the same way you would take on a new roll in your company and you would sit down and you think, okay, what's my plan for the next three months? How am I going to get into this understanding of these key concepts? If we were to sit down and really think about what now does this vision look like for us as parents, as mothers? What is our motherhood identity or parenting identity? How will we show up? What does success look like for us? Not The success from the general default of society. So what does that look like? I have a colleague who she works two days a week. She's a mom,...

...she works two days a week and that two days a week that she works is more than enough for her to have a very fulfilling life because she's very strategic. But she sat down and thought about that and I will tell you some people do give their unsolicited opinion to her and about what she's doing and all this other stuff. But to really think about what that looks like for you. Think about what it looks like for you when you're raising your children, if you're choosing, like me, to if you did homeschooling. I homeschooled for five years, so would that looked like? And once you have that vision for yourself, then when those unsolicited opinions come and when those comments come, you're not taking them in on as your identity and feeling guilty or feeling overwhelm because you've already worked towards your vision. You've already worked towards that. So if you are in your college role and someone says, okay, you're you're going to medical school and it's taking eight years, why are you doing that? You're wasting time. Yeah, yeah, that's good, I know what I'm doing, I'm on my track, you know. So you know it's not going to shake you because you have already created a plan for yourself. So that's really what I mean when I say birth thing into the motherhood identity, creating a vision for yourself, parenting vision for yourself. Yeah, and it's so important, like you mentioned, for parenting or anything else in your life, to have a clear idea of what success needs to you. And that seems to be the common thread around highly successful people. Of It's not tunnel vision, but you're right, they have an idea of like what it is that they're striving for so that when things come up or when things don't go as expected it, it's not throwing them totally off course. It's just kind of like veering around a speedbump and then continuing on your path. So yeah, I love what you had to say about that. And another topic you broach in your book is just the importance of moving from...

...just doing to being. And again, the backtoback, the juggling multiple jobs, the wearing a lot of hats. It can be really easy to get caught up in the whirlwind. So what are some ways that you focus on just being, whether that's as a mother or when you're at work, or just the being present? Hmmm, presence is so important. So I would say look for me, I mean I start with the physical I start with physical distraction. So you know, I could go down rabbit holes easily brook. I mean trust me, everything in my book is from Personal Experience and or my coaching experience. So like the guild and all that stuff. I had it, I had it, I have gone through it. I didn't have that vision, I created the vision and so everything that I'm talking about is is not something that I've read in a textbook, but I've written it in my own book actually, so I love it. But I start with physical environment. Your physical environment is a great indication, indicator of how you can be in a do mode rather than a b mode. And so I look at physical distractions. I remove clutter, I put like playing hands and different things in my environment that will help me to be present and focus when I'm connecting with other people. And then, as far as like that mental presence, I make sure that I am not doing backtobacktobacktobacktoback meetings, because it really doesn't give me time to prepare, even if I have ten minutes before another meeting, ten to fifteen minutes before another meeting, it's a great booster and so it gives you a downtime, you can shift your energy, you can come and be prepared, close out all of the browsers. I know this is people who are listening to this when they're like already having heart palpitations because so many tabs them all. That is a distraction meter. Your meter is high if you have over two tabs open, and so really trying to...

...use those techniques like keeping the tabs down to a minimum of two so that you can be focused and be present, turning off the notifications. And then, as far as the emotional presence is there. I make sure that I journal. I Journal a lot. That's something that I've been doing ever since I was a little girl, and so I journal so that if there is anything that is blocking, that's coming up, that I'm paying attention to, I can address it and not bring that transference to somebody else's meeting or somebody else's connection with me, because it does carry on. You know, you have a bad a bad encounter, it knocks you off, you know, for a little bit, and then you go into the next one, okay, thinking, okay, what's this, what's going to happen here? You know. So I make sure that I take time to actually just bullet out real quick what happened, when did I start to feel uncomfortable, what was said specifically, you know, and then I clear that out and move and move on. Oh, I love that. I think it's a great idea. And you're doing that in between or just like throughout the day. Well, if it bothers me, I mean, because sometimes if something is bothering you, you you can start your day in a fabulous state. A lot of people don't, but I am intentional about starting my day and filling my cup up. But if you can start your day and in thirty minutes something can happen and you can have a shift in your mood and you can feel like it's like blocking you from from making your next call or doing the next proposal or, you know, whatever it is. But it's okay to pay attention to it and if I feel like it's just I'm feeling, I will just put out my little paper quickly identify. Okay, what was it that was said that shifted this this feeling for me? Right? Did I feel like I wasn't as prepared? Did I feel embarrassed? Was I was? Did I feel insulted? Like, what was it? Because there had to...

...have been something, you know, right. Was the person who was on the other end not paying attention and I'm talking and they're doing a billion things or whatever, like, whatever it is, I'm just making these examples up, and so I just kind of get in touch with with that really quickly and then and work through that and then move on like that's that's a solid methodology to clear out blocks in your in your connection process. Yeah, yeah, such great advice. I am enlightened and inspired her our conversation here today. Money and tell us where can listeners if they want a bit more of those work and they find your New Book Intentional Motherhood. Yes, you know, it's on Amalon. God calm. You could get us oncom but you could also get it from me. Guess what, there's a link on my linked in profile, and so if you want to personalize copy, you can go to my linkedin profile, get it and it will be in the mail to you. Oh my gosh, I love it. All right. So, Monique Russell Clear Communications on Linkedin. Look her up the pots if you haven't already. And one last question for Fructia for fundies before we wrap. But when the pandemic is like over over, we're we got the light at the end of the tunnel. But when we're hopefully quote back to normal, what activity are you most excited about? WHOA well, I have been living my life, so my life is not stopped because of the pandemic. Still connect with people, I guess. But let me see, because I think I know exactly what you're saying. So if there's anything that I would say I'm looking forward to, it would be much more travel, because travel is something that I love, absolutely, Love, love, love, loved doing, and so that would be the thing ones. Things are okay, because I actually I haven't traveled ever since it started. So same I missed being...

...on airpoints. Who would have who would have thought that you would say that all I like my food and I said, listen, de Higration, I miss it, the dehydration. Oh, Brok, I don't miss that, but I definitely want to go watch those movies on the airplane with those long flights. Absolutely it's some zen time. Hmmm, well money. Thank you again. Everybody be sure to check her out. CEO. Author, Mother Monique Russell, and like then, a clear communication solutions and thank you for a great rest your day. Thank you to break. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. To help this get in front of more eyes and ears, please leave us a shining five star review. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out of your sales engagement strategy. Make sure to check out outreach, that ioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

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