The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

Building Your Sales Career w/ Jesse Rothstein

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Building a career in sales comes down to three simple things: knowing yourself, relationships and choosing your tactics.

I am joined by Jesse Rothstein, Global Account Manager for LinkedIn Sales Solutions, to discuss these things in more detail so you can use them to enhance your sales career, starting right this moment.

What we talked about:

  • Jesse’s superhero origin story
  • The power of consistently doing simple things really well
  • Specific lessons from Jesse’s time at LinkedIn
  • The book he authored: “Carry That Quota”

We mention these resources during the show, for you to look up and make use of:

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Sales Engagement Podcast in your favorite podcast player.
 

... got to tell you that on least two thousand and twenty one, on May eleven through thirteen, were focusing on how to win together in the new sales era. You'll learn new go to market strategies, get deeper funnel insides and actional takeaways for your entire org from revenue leaders, Highgro startups and fortune five hundred companies and are very special guests or none other than Guy Raz the podcaster and author of how I built this and carry lawns, the first female fighter pilot in the US Navy. Come Save Your seat for this high energy online event at only stock outreach. That I oh. Now let's get into it. Welcome to the sales engagement a podcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, and they just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach. Well does outreach learn how the team follows up with every lead in record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see how outreachrus account based plays, manages reps and so much more using their own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as they do. Head to outreach, Doo on outreach to see what they have going on. Now let's get into today's episode. Hello and welcome back everyone to the sales engagement podcast. You're hanging out with Scott Parker, and thank you, as always, I say it every week, for lending us your ear drums for the next thirty minutes. Everything's buying for your attention these days and I'm gratefully decided to spend it with us. And, as always, we're going to bring the hate to give me a great episode. I am joined by Jesse Rothstein. Jesse, welcome to the show. Hey, Scott, thanks for having me. Excited to have you on. I feel like it's been a long time coming boust around the calendar a little bit, so excited to finally be doing this. So for...

...the listeners, Jesse is currently a global account manager at a small little company called called Linkedin, who we all know and love. We all probably spend way too much time of our our working hours on on Linkedin. I know I certainly do. Q Tu Chan and he's also the author of carry that quota. So he has written a book where he's sharing all of his lessons how to figure out if sales is the right career for you, how to have a productive career and some tips tricks you've learned along the way. But that's the abbreviated version and I always like to hear it directly from you because you can at linkedin seven years. I can't even imagine the growth and the journey you have had there, let alone you know, before that. So for those joining us, I usually kind of word it as your superhero origin story. How did you get to where you're at today? Well, you know, Scott, my mentality in terms of my daytoday is pretty simple. I like to do simple things really well over time and I believe when you do the simple things really well over time they add up and equal really big things, and I've been subscribed to that my whole professional career and it's sort of this blue color mentality that I bring to what I do at work and also what I do outside of work. And I don't know if it's a if it's a superpower or whatever you want to call it, but I'm just a big believer that simplicity is is important in terms of how we all operate. I really like that mentality and about that one down simple things really well over time and then that's it's this idea that I always talked about a lot.

It's all the good things in life come from compound interest, right. So if you if you constantly are doing this small things right, over time those small things kind of snowball and they become the big things. So I'd be right there with you. I really like the way they way you put that. Okay, so walk me through the journey, man. How did you get to Linkedin? How did you get into sales? You know, walk we walk me through it. So I started my sales career fourteen years old. I was in high school. Had A family friend that ran an antique and Jewelry Shop Upstate New York, where I grew up, small town called Mayapack, and my parents wanted me to get an after school job. They thought it was important. When I turned fourteen and I was exposed to a very, very strong and passionate entrepreneur and he ran this antique and Jewelry Shop Business and that was sort of my first experience in terms of seeing sales in its most basic form happen. And as I got more experience there, I began interacting with clients there and just really enjoy the human interaction. And then, you know, once I graduated high school and moved on to college, began to realize that, you know, working with people was something that I like to do. I wasn't day kind of a sit behind the desk cubicle kind of guy and took internships and got experience in, you know, what I'd call client facing sales rolls. Was Fortunate in college to get an internship with proctor and gamble, which is where I started my career and spent the first six seven years with proctor and gamble at an entry level be to be selling roll selling commercial dish soap and coffee in Brooklyn, which was an interesting or to get a Bob sales experience selling restaurants in Brooklyn. And then, you know, over time kind of have had this hybrid mix of working...

...for large, multi national, wellknown global companies, proctor and gamble, staples Linkedin, but also along the way took some exits and worked for some startups and some of those startups went on to grow and some of those startups went on to to crash, as some of them do, but I've kind of got this this history in this background of being a career sales professional with kind of that big company and startup mix. That's a heck of a journey. I wonder if your self diagnosed kind of blue collar strategy to take to this has something to do with selling dis soap in Brooklyn to restaurant on earth that, but I bet part of that DNA came from that. That time period would be yeah, it could be, for sure. I like it. That would definitely need a lot of hustle and grit in that role. That's cool, all right. So I like this. So you've got this kind of start up mentality, blue collar mentality, but also worked at these huge beam of companies. Walk me through a little bit at your time at Linkedin. It's been seven years. It's been incredible amount of change and growth and acquisitions at Linkedin. What are some of the kind of lessons you've teased out from your time specifically over the seven years at what what looks like a tremendous ride multiple promotions? Walk me through that a little bit. Yeah, well, it's funny. My my entry point in to Linkedin is a little unorthodox and I'll explain quickly, because there's a there's a mutual connection in that I was living at the time in Australia, in Sydney, and my wife is Australian and we were we were living in that part of the world and I was working for staples as a business development rep working with some large companies in...

Australia and New Zealand, and I was approached by somebody that we both know, a guy by the name of Matt Loop, and at the time Matt was in Sydney and he was building out his first team in a division within linkedin that was relatively new, the sales solutions division. At that time linkedin had a very, very large talent solutions or recruiting business and a very large marketing or at seals business, but linkedin was beginning to dabble kind of in this in this sales acceleration sort of space and they were bringing what we now know as linkedin cells. Navigated a market and through a referral and through some connectivity, I got hooked into Matt and you know, the journey really begins there and what I learned along the way at Linkedin, from mad and from others, is that ultimately, when you're trying to help customers or prospects solve business problems and you can show them with data and numbers and stories that they can solve those problems, you know, with your products and services, then you're doing the right thing. And back in the day and Sydney, that's what our team was focused on. Matt how to s laser focused on that. We were bringing customers on board and we were essentially building the market with the trailblazers and that part of the world, so Australia, New Zealand and Southeast Asia. We were the first on land down there selling cells navigator. So even though we were backed by Linkedin and even though we had the brand behind us to a certain extent, we were kind of like a startup group within the company in that part of the world. That would have been such a cool time to be a part of such a thing that has gone on to become. To talk specifics, but I imagine sales navigators one of the biggest, you know, business units at at Linkedin now, and to be...

...able to take that to a region for the first time. That's that's really cool. There's a double, double connection there. I do know Matt loop and I lived in Sydney for a about six months when I was a young kid of eight hundred and eighteen, right after high school. I'm to Sydney a suburb called Paramata, of very rough suburb, I might add, by myself. Weird time period in my life. But if it's a lot of fun. Yeah, yeah, I know Paramatta very well. See, yeah, there's that. The Albion hotel was a bar. We used to go to paramedict eels with the Rugby League, Rugby League team. Oh yeah, yeah, a lots of fun. All right. But let's get into the book a little bit. So carry that quote up. I have started it, I have not completed it. Let's wrestle with a few of the kind of the key themes of of the book, maybe starting with what made you decide to write a book? I know it's a massive undertaking. What was kind of like the burning desire and you that was like I got to get this thing out. Yeah, so the the why for writing the book is pretty simple. Very much did this on more of a personal bucket list kind of thing. I had the idea of putting something together to help salespeople for a while and it really started probably maybe five, six years ago actually in New Zealand. I was having dinner with a with a prospect of the time who end up being a client and has since, you know, turned into a friend and mentor, and he was sort of educating me and explaining to me that in New Zealand and in that part of the world a lot of what they focus on the present is figuring out ways that they can help the next generation when they're no longer around and this idea of legacy and that's something that's very, very prominent in their life in New Zealand and it's something they think about in a daily basis. And he challenged me and he sort of...

...said, you know, have you ever thought about doing something that's going to be around when you're not around? And I you know that night, you know we were we were out and have a dinner and dinner tendered to drinks and then I got back to the hotel and I couldn't get this idea out of my head and next morning when I woke up, I said, you know what, now's the time to do this and you know the content had been in my head. I started putting the content down on paper and started recording and then in January two thousand and sixteen, got a lot more serious and and really built out a schedule on a plan to not only write this book but bring this book to market. So that's the why and it's, like I said, it's been sort of this side project for the past five six years and you know, recently it came to market and we've got something that is there for sales people to help them get better both now and in the future. And that's really the why, Scott. That's where it came from. I think that's a an incredible why, something I actually just wrote about fairly fairly recently. It's this this idea of all these stories that we all have, all these lessons that we all all learn. Often when we get older, we death, whatever it may be, they're they're gone with us and I think at East, in Western society, we don't do a very good job at quote ons. But like respecting our elders and hearing those stories and making sure that we learn those lessons that that have been learned before, so we don't just have to keep like groundhog day, just like repeating the same mistakes again and again. So I love that you've taken that and just written a book basically like Hey, here's my journey, here's what I learned. If you're a young seller or an old seller, you can access my brain and it will outlive you, out last you. I think that's a great why. All right, what's what are a few of the themes in the book? I imagine you know there's an underpinning do the simple things...

...really well over time. What else is there that you're trying to get across to two sellers? Maybe some of the stories, anecdotes, tips, anything you want to sort of sort of highlight in there? Yeah, well, the book itself is broken up into three main pillars and the book is designed to help the young potential salesperson that is thinking about getting into the profession or the more mature career sales professional or career professional that might be thinking about getting into sales. So that's kind of the the core target, if you will, for the book and the three pillars that I was alluding to. The first one is all about knowing yourself and having this self awareness and, to a certain extent, this self confidence, so that you understand what it takes to be in the sales profession and this understanding that you're going to get beat up, you're going to hear know and it's not the kind of profession where if you can't deal with rejection, you know this may not be the right profession for you. So that's pillar number one. Pillar number two is all about relationships. It's relationships with your prospects, with your clients, with your co workers, with your managers, with potentially, you know, your partners depending on how your company goes to market. And it's this belief that I firmly believe in, that the currency of business is and always will be relationships. So, through stories and through different anecdotes, there's a bunch of different tips and ideas and concepts about the importance of relationships, how to maximize them, how to develop them, nurture them, etc. And then the last pillar, Scott, it's it's very tactical. It's what I would say are very pragmatic, detailed in the weeds type of nuggets that I've discovered over the...

...past, you know, fifteen, seventeen years of being a court carrying seller. That may not work for everyone, but they've worked for me and these are the things that you know, you're not going to hear from your sales writing this department. You're not going to hear from a sales enablement specialist. These are things you're going to hear from a REP coming to other reps as to how to do those little things and maximize your productivity so you can be the best in your role. And ultimately, the book itself, the uniqueness of it, I feel the uniqueness of it is the tonality and the message is coming from someone who has been in the trenches and is still in the trenches. So I'm forty years old. I've got the scars to prove it. I'm still in those trenches collecting those scars. You know I'm not, you know, sixty five seven years old. You know, telling you, you know how it should be based on my thirty five or forty years in the profession. I'm right there in it with every single rep that that is hopefully reading the book and, to my knowledge, is one of the only books out there in, you know, this kind of cell genre that's written by someone who's still carrying the quota. Yeah, I really like that angle and I think it's so so important. I can't remember who said it, but it's kind of like the quote goes, show me, don't tell me right. A lot of these books just tell you what to do based on you don't know when they did this. You don't know when this happened. They could be a sales consultant for ten years, but just nothing wrong with that. But they're telling you something versus you. It sounds like in this book your essentially showing you know what you did, here's what I did it, here's what I do, and take what you want. That's it. That's it, and it's you know, it's small things, Scott, that that are not what I call rocket science kind of things. But like one example that pops out is, you know, this simple tactics for true time...

...management as it relates to prospecting, as it relates to follow up. You know the importance of, you know, having your calendar planned, you know, to three weeks in advance based on the amount of meetings you have prospecting you need to do follow up that might be required. Little small things like like we talked to the beginning, when they add up, they lead to big things and you know, the book gets really, really granular. I mean we even get into, you know, prior to being in the pandemic and dealing with this little anecdotal things to look for in facetoface meetings, how to observe body language, different supplies that may or may not be in your backpack or your briefcase if you're on the road, things that might come in handy that you don't think of that you might need. So it gets pretty granular and it's got application, you know, obviously for in person stuff, but also for the virtual selling that you know is going on right now and we'll probably go on for the next year or so. Yeah, yeah, I like it all right. I want to dive not too deeply into the three three sections. Go you're going to have to go grab the book to get the full version up. Let's walk through the three really quickly. So number one was kind of like know yourself and be be honest with your with yourself. If I'm a young seller and we have all the demographics of this listener, demographics are everyone from like a brand new BDR to a manage your director. You know, see our maybe I'm a new seller and I'm questioning my choices, by decisions do you have any advice for how to do? I guess like honest reflection with yourself, like how did you do that early in your your career? How did you have those conversations with yourself? Yes, I think the thing that I gravitated towards when I was earlier in my career was what is it that's pulling me in the direction to want to help...

...people? Because I think sales and its most raw form is helping people, often helping people solve problems that they know they have or in many cases they don't know they have and you've got to go discover it for them. So when I would would be early in my career and I would sort of say to myselfness, is this something I really want to do? And you know I got a big number this quarter, I got a big number of this year and you know I'm working hard to get there, but I want to do this forever. What always got me back and centered was, yeah, this is what you want to do because inherently you want to help people and you want to help people because is your curious person and you like to learn. And I think sales people, I think really good sales people, are so curious all the time and they want to learn, they want to help their customer and I think if that's in your blood and that's in your DNA, that you've got the basics, you've got the kind of raw materials to be a salesperson and being good salesperson. That, for me, was kind of my my guiding principle. Scott, I like it. Curiosity is is huge. And Yeah, just when times get to you are your change agent that helps others. That's what that's what you're doing. So what you no matter how big your your number seems, just if you can remind yourself that, it doesn't quite seem as as daunting, I like it all right. Number number two. With this you said something which I really liked, that the currency of business is relationships, which I totally agree with. I often say a slightly different version that relationship of business is trust, which is essentially a relationship same thing. Give the listeners some advice on navigating relationships early in your career, because I I can point to so many early in my career that somehow come like full circle, and I never would have thought that it would come full circle on my my boss at this time. Then became,...

...you know, a customer here and all this stuff. Walk me through some just some advice on for those starting their career how to think about relationships. If that is the truth, which I we both agree upon, the currency of business is trust and relationships. How do I navigate that before I have many relationships. Yeah, so what I would say is the way that I would think about it is this is, you know, I might be dating myself, but but I'm assuming you're familiar with the the movie back to the future. Of course, of course. Yeah, yeah, yeah, well, you know, I would say if you're a young salesperson and you're thinking about the importance of relationships and how should I be thinking about them? In the movie back to the future, they develop this time machine and they can program, you know, future time and date into this car that's a time machine. They could go into the future and kind of see how things pan out. And the way that I would encourage young people to think about relationships developing those is early in your career, when you're just starting out and establishing yourself, transport yourself to five, ten, fifteen, twenty years in the future and with the people that you're working with, the prospects, the clients, whoever it might be. When you go to the future, when you hop in that time machine, so to speak, are you able to go back to those people? Can they go back to you and can you say, wow, it's been five hundred, ten, fifteen, twenty years? I remember when we work together and you really helped me solve this problem or that problem, and one of the biggest things that I love about the profession is being able to go back to those initial clients who were prospects. And maybe you're in a different industry, maybe you're in a different part of the world, you know, who knows where life takes you. But if you're...

...young and you can plant those seeds and build those relationships and help people out and then knowing the future over time that you can always call them, they can always call you, that's a really healthy way to think about developing relationships, because there's a bunch of stuff out there today that you know, productivity gains and technology, and you know getting in the door quickly and all the great stuff the technology has brought is fantastic, but in the end, you know it's about people and if you can, if you can build those relationships and have them last over time. That's a valuable thing and young people need to be thinking about that. That was absolute gold. I really, really like that way of thinking about it. I think that will be very helpful to a lot of the listeners. That's that's really interesting. I've just like yeah, Hey, cook, this this relationship that I'm building right now, because this stand the test of time up like ten years, but this person still take my my call or a copy and ten years from now, can I show that much value in its relations ship? I like it all right, and yes, yeah, yeah, no, I just was going to say in a lot of it goes back to a lot of the principles that are important in sales anyway. But either the personalization, being memorable, being different, creating a customer experience that's so unique they'll always remember it. And you do that, you do that the right way. You those people remember you and your team forever and that makes it that much easier to go back to them in five, ten years and say, Hey, how are things? has been a while since we caught up, but it was it was great. When we work together. What's been going on since? Make them remember you and different yours, differentiate yourself from anyone else that they're working with on a daily basis. Yeah, this reminds me of literally a call I had yesterday with one of my first, one of my first VP's of sales a long, long time ago. Ahead and talk to him in at least five years. He's now the chief partner officer at a massive fortune, one,...

...one hundred company that outreaches is trying to work with and I shot him a out. Within five minutes he got back to me. We had an incredible our long catchup call and yeah, it's it's it's amazing business. Business Karma is real. Those relationships, if you're doing good business with good people, they don't they stand the test of time. All right, last one. This is the the tactical piece, and I'll let you share any any of the tactics. You mentioned a few of them. Time management credibly important. What to bring with you on trips. Do you want to go deeper on just any one of the tactics? Maybe one of your favorite ones? That aren't that maybe your sales manager wouldn't tell you. You know, I would say for me, the one that I continue to go back to. We spoke about it earlier with time management, but it's a small one that, unfortunately, it's just not taught, but it's just a simple one and it's when you look at your schedule and you look at your day and you say, Oh, you know, today I've got three calls, you know, three discovery calls, three pitch calls, three done it whatever might be, taking the time prior to those calls to go to the calendar and allocate the proper amount of follow up time that's going to be required after those calls. And you're probably saying, like your Jess, you're crazy, like we are you talking about? Well, I just can't tell you how often I hear from from salespeople of all ages. You know, I just I've had such a busy couple of days and now I've got, you know, five hundred and ten, fifteen hours worth of follow up based on all the stuff that I was supposed to do, based on all these meetings I've had, and I just don't know what I'm going to do it. And as a result, now I've got to work late into the night or I've got to work on a weekend. And just a small act of saying got three hours...

...worth of calls today, I don't care who you are, whether even if it's a really bad call, inevitably there's going to be some type of follow up, a thank you note, something you can have to get back to the client on. Just allocate that time later that day, the next day, whenever it might be, so that ultimately you're on top of it. That's one example from the tactics piece in the third portion of the book that there's plenty of others, but that one I find to be most actionable because ninety nine point nine percent of reps I speak to just don't do it. I like that one a lot. I like that one a lot. It's coming. It comes down to you know, you control your your time as much as you know. Things pop up on your calendar and you have to, you know, be there when a prospect or client needs you. Like you ultimately control your time, you control your calendar. Make sure you block those those times. And there's also this piece when you don't do that Follo up. We've all been in those positions where we have like a build up of follow up, that anxious kind of energy of you know you have a bunch of stuff you got to do that you don't really want to do later, it's going to come with you in two calls. Whether it's subconsciously or people pick up on that. So if you're on top of it and you're doing it, you know that same day. I think that's great. So tactically, then, do you where you do you block fifteen minutes after each call or bought block, an hour block each day, or how do you tactically do that one? Yeah, so tacnically for me, and this we talked about this a little bit in the book, but I've been subscribing to a to a methodology since early in my career. There's a method out there called the action method, which is it was started by a company called be hands, which, you know, at one point was acquired by adobe and my buddy started this company and he's now at adobe. But the action method really simply is what I would consider to be the most bulletproof mechanism to both...

...take notes and capture action items for every call, meeting, whatever it is you might have. So for me personally, Scott, what I do is the first thing I do during every call, during every meeting, is I just as my first to do list item, I say allocate time on the calendar for follow up from this call. So if I've got a thirty minute or an hour long conversation with a prospect or a client, the first thing I'm doing is saying, okay, later in the day, next day, two days after, whatever it might be. It's going to take me thirty, forty, five, sixty minutes to do all the follow ups required, get that on the calendar and then just do that work in that allocated space of time. All like a simple, incredibly effective you'll be less stressed out, you'll be less anxious, you'll be much, much more effective. I could use her refresher course. I think that this action method. So I'm going to go look at my calendar next week and I think makes him some changes because of this episode. Well, Jesse, it's it's been a lot of fun man. There's a lot in here. I'm excited to get through your book. You have an incredible amount of insight. You've had an incredible career, so thank you so much for for coming on and sharing your knowledge with us. No, thanks for having me. Really, really great to chat. Appreciate the time and you know we'll keep in touch. Absolutely absolutely. And where where can people go and get your books. It on Amazon. I know you've got a website. What's the best way? Yeah, best way to get the book is on Amazon, hard copy, soft copy, kindle addition, or if you're more of a digital audiobook person, it's also available on audible, and that's both in the US as well as globally. Beautiful. All right, Jesse well, thank you again, and for all those that hung out with us, thank you so much. I'm a texcellent to day and will see you next time. This was another episode of the sales engagement podcast. To help this get in front of more eyes and...

...ears, please leave us a shining five star review. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out of your sales engagement strategy, make sure to check out outreach. That ioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

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