The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

Building Your Sales Career w/ Jesse Rothstein

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Building a career in sales comes down to three simple things: knowing yourself, relationships and choosing your tactics.

I am joined by Jesse Rothstein, Global Account Manager for LinkedIn Sales Solutions, to discuss these things in more detail so you can use them to enhance your sales career, starting right this moment.

What we talked about:

  • Jesse’s superhero origin story
  • The power of consistently doing simple things really well
  • Specific lessons from Jesse’s time at LinkedIn
  • The book he authored: “Carry That Quota”

We mention these resources during the show, for you to look up and make use of:

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Sales Engagement Podcast in your favorite podcast player.
 

Hay folks is ener me born now beforejumping in I've got to tell you Ahaut, I'm least two thousand and twenty oneon Ma, eleven thrughthiteen were focusing on Hawto wing together in thenew sales era, you'll learn you go to marces strategies, get deeper, funal,insides and aximal takewast foryour entire, or from revenue leaders at Hig,Gro, startups and fortune five hundred companies and ar very special guests,or none other than Guyras. The podcaster author of how I built thisand carry laurence. The first female fiter pilot in the US baby come sinherseat for this high energy on line, even at only stot out reach tot IO. Now,let's get into it. Welcome to the sales engagement, apodcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagementplatform and they just launched out reach on our reach the place to learnhow outreach well does nout reach learn how the team follows up with every leadin record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can alsosee how outrecins account based plays, manages reps and so much more usingtheir own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulledfrom out reach processes and customer base when you're done you'll be able todo it as good as they do had the outreachd on io on out reach to seewhat they have going on now, let's get into the day's episode hello andwelcome back everyone to thes sales engagement, podcast, you're hanging utwith Scott Barker, and thank you, as always. I say it every week for lendingus. Your hear drums for the next thirty minutes, everything's bying for yourattention these days and I'm grateful you decided to spend it with us and, as always, we're going to bring theheat. Give me a great episode. I am joined by Jesse Rottstein Jesse Wulcometo the Shell, a Scott thanks for having me excited to have you on. I feel likeit's been a long time coming bouched around the calendar a little bit soexcited to finally be doing this so for...

...the listeners. Jesse is currently aglobal account manager at a small little company called th called Linkdin,who we all know and love. We all probably spend way too much time of ourworking hours on on Linkein. I know I certainly do Hutu San and he's also theauthor of carry that Quoda, so he has written a book where he's sharingall of his lessons how to figure out if sales is the right career for you, howto have a productive career and some tipped tricks, you've learned along theway, but that's the abbreviated version mand. I always like to hear it directlyfrom you because you can at linked in seven years. I can't even imagine thegrowth and the the journey you have had there, let along you know before that.So for those joining us, I usually kind of word it as your superhero originstory. How did you get to wher you're act today? Well, you know Scott. My mentality in terms of my day todayis pretty simple. I like to do simple things really well over time, and Ibelieve when you do the simple things really well over time, they add up andequal really big things, and I've been subscribed to that. My wholeprofessional career and it's sort of this blue coloar mentality that I bringto what I do at work and also what I do outside of work, and I don't know ifit's a if it's a super power or whatever you want to call it, but I'mjust a big believer that simplicity is is important in terms of how we alloperate. I really like that mentality. I brote that one down simple thingsreally well over time and then that's it's. This idea that I always I talkabout a lot is all the good things in...

...life come from compound interest right.So if you, if you constantly, are doing the small things right, overtime, thosesmall things kind of snowball and they become the big thing, so I'd be right there with you. I really like theway they wher you put that okay so walk way through the journey man. How didyou get to Linkin? How did you get into sales? You know walk. We walk meethrough it, so I started my sales career fourteen years old, I was in high school. Had A family friendthat ran a antique and Jelery Shop, upstate New York, where I grew up smalltown called Maapack and my parents wanted me to get and after school jobthey thought it was important. When I turned fourteen and I was exposed to a very, verystrong and passionate entrepreneur- and he ran this antique and Jewelry ShopBusiness and that was sort of my first experience interms of seeing sales ind, its most basic form happen and, as I got more experience there, I beganinteracting with clients there and just really enjoy the human interaction. Andthen you know, once I graduated high school and moved on to college began torealize that you know working with people was something that I like to do.I wasn't a kind of a sit behind the desk cubocl kind of guy and tookinternships and got experienced in you know what I'd call client facing salesroles was fortunate in college to get an internship with proctor and gamble,which is where I started my career and spent the first six, seven years withprocter and gamble at an entry level B, Tob selling, roll selling commercialdish, Sopan coffee in Brooklyn, which was an interesting start to get a BTBsales experience, selling restaurants in Brooklyn. And then you know overtime kind of have had this...

...hybrid mix of working for largemultinational, well known global companies, froctor and Gamble StaplesLinkedin, but also along the way, took some exits and worked for some startups,and some of those startups went on to grow and some of those startups wentonto to crash as some of them do. But I've kind of got this. This history. Inthis background of being a career sales professional with kind of that bigcompany and startup mix, that'sa a heck of a journey. I wonder if Youre selfdiagnosed kind of blue collarstrategy to take to this has something to do with selling disshop in Brooklynto restaurant owners that bucs, I bet part of that. GNA came from that thattime period- hey yeah, it could be for sure I like it. That would definitely need alot of pustle and grit in that role. That's cool all right! So I like this,so you've got this kind of startup mentality, blue Coler mentality, butalso worked at these huge bame of companies walkme through a little bitat your time at Linkedin, it's been seven years, jus been incredible amountof change and growth and acquisitions at Linkin. What are some of the kind oflessons that you've teaced out from your time, specifically over the theseven years at what what looks like a tremendous ride? Multiple PromotionsWalk me through that a little bit yeah. Well, it's funny my my entryPointinto Linkedin is a little unorthodox and I'll explain quickly,because there's a there's, a mutual connection in that I was living at the time in Australiaand Sydney, and my wife is Australian and we were we were living in that partof the world, and I was working for staples as a business development repworking with some large companies in...

Australia and New Zealand, and I wasapproached by somebody that we both know a Guy Bot, the name of Mat loopand at the time Matt was in Sydney and he was building out his first team in adivision within linkedin that was relatively new. The sales solutionsdivision at that time, Linkedin had a very, very large talent solutions orrecruiting business and a very large marketing or adsouse business. Butlinkdon was beginning to dabble kind of in this. In this sales, accelerationsort of space and they were bringing what we now know is Lindon sellsnavigated a market and throu referral and through some connectivity I gothooked into Matt, and you know the journey really begins there and what I learned along the way it linkedin from mattand from others, is that, ultimately, when you're trying to helpcustomers or prospects solve business problems- and you can show them withdata and numbers and stories that they can solve those problems, you know withyour products and services, then you're doing the right thing and back in the day in Sydney, that's whatour team was focused on Matt, how to slaves are focused on that. We werebringing customers on board and we were essentially building the market. Wewere the trail blazers in that part of the world, so Australia, New Zealandand Southeast Asia. We were the first on land down there selling sallsnavigator. So, even though we were backed by Linkedin, and even though wehad the brand behind us to a certain extent, we were kind of like a astartup group within the company in that part of the world. That would havebeen such a cool time to be a part of such a a thing that has gone on tobecome to talk specifics, but I imagine sales navigators, one of the biggestyou know business units at at Linkein...

...now and to be able to take that to aregion for the first time. That's that's, really cool, there's a doubledouble connection there I do know Matt Lop and I lived in Sydney for about sixmonths. When I was a young kid, I was geighteen right after high school. Imove to Sydney, a suburb called Paramatta, a very rough suburb. I myDad ' by myself wit, a time firiot in my life Buif, it's a lot of fun, Yeah Yeah! I know Paro Mata very well, O youyeah! There's that the albian hotel was a a bar. We used to goto paramedic eels with the the rugule Rugby League team. Oh Yeah Yeah lots of fun all right, but let's getinto the book a little bit so carry that quotup. I have started it. I havenot completed it. Let's wrestle with a few of the kind of the key themes of ofthe book, maybe starting with what made you decide to write a book. I know it'sa massive undertaking. What was kind of like the burning desire and you therewas like I got to get this thing out, yeah, so the the Wy for writing thebook is pretty simple. I very much did this on more of a personal bucket listkind of thing. I had the idea of putting something together to helpsales people for a while, and it really started-probably maybe five six years ago, actually in New Zealand. I was havingdinner with a with he prospect of the time who windup being a client and has, since you know, turned into a friend and mentor,and he was sort of educating me and explaining to me that in New Zealandand in that part of the world, a lot of what they focus on the present isfiguring out ways that they can help the next generation when they're nolonger around. And this idea of legacy and that's something- that's very, veryprominent in their life in New Zealand and it's something they think about ina daily basis. And he challenged me and...

...he sort of said you know, have you ever thought about doingsomething that's going to be around when you're not around, and I you knowthat night. You know we were. We were out and Havang dinner and dinnertendered to drinks, and then I got back to the hotel and I couldn't get thisidea out of my head and next morning, when I woke up, I said you know whatnow the tin to do this, and you know the content had been in myhead. I started putting the content down on paper and started, recordingand then in January, two thousand and sixteen got a lot more serious andreally built out a schedule and a plan to not only write this book Tut bringthis book to market. So that's the why and it's like. I said it's been sort ofthis side project for the past five six years and you know recently it came tomarket and we've got something that is there forsales people to help them get better both now and in the future, and that's really the wy Scott that that'swhere it came from. I think that's at an incredible why something I actuallyjust wrote about fairly apparently recently. Is this this idea of allthese stories that we all have all these lessons that we are ar learned?Often when we get older, we death whatever it may be, therthey're gonewith us and I think at least in Western society we don't do a very good job, atquote on Wut like respecting our elders and hearing those stories and makingsure that we learn those lessons that that have been learned before. So wedon't just have to keep like groundhog day, just like repeating the samemistakes again and again. So I love it. You've taken that and just written abook. Basically like hey here's, my journey, here's what I learned ifyou're a a young seller or an old seller, you can access my brainand it will outlive you at last. You, I think, that's a a great wy all right.What's what are a few of the the themes...

...in the book? I imagine you know, there's an underpinning. Dothe simple things really well over time? What else is there that you're tryingto to get across to to sellers? Maybe some of the the stories anecdotes tips?Anything you want to sort of sort of highlight in there yeah. Well, the bookitself is broken up into three maid pillars, and the book is designed tohelp the young potential salesperson that is thinking about getting into theprofession or the more mature career sales, professional or carearprofessional that might be thinking about getting into sales. So that'skind of the the coure target. If you will for the book and the three pillarsthat I was alluding to the first one is all about knowing yourself and havingthis selfawareness and, to a certain extent, this self confidence, so thatyou understand what it takes to be in the sales profession andthisunderstanding that you're going to get beat up you'regoing to hear no and it's not the kind of profession where, if you can't dealwith rejection, you know this may not be the right profession for you. Sothat's piller number one piller number two is all about relationships. It'srelationships with your prospects with your clients, with your coworkers, withyour managers with potentially you know your partners depending on how yourcompany goes to market, and it's this belief that I firmly believe in thatthe currency of business isn't always will be relationships so throughstories and through different anecdotes, there's a bunch of different tips andideas and concepts about the importance of relationships, how to maximize them,how to develop them, ner, trymemit, ca and then the last color Scot. It's it'svery tactical. It's what I would say are very pragmatic, detailed in the weedstype of nuggets that I discover it over...

...the past. You know fifteen seventeenyears of being a quarter carrying seller that may not work for everyone,but they've worked for me, and these are the things that you know you're notgoing to hear from your sales reatinthiss department, you're notgoing to hear from a sales ennablement specialist. These are things you'regoing to hear from a REP coming to other reps as to how to do those littlethings and maximize your productivity. So you could be the best in your roleand ultimately, the book itself, the uniqueness of it. I feel the uniquenessof it is th the tonality and the message is coming from someone who hasbeen in the trenches and is still in the trenches. So I'm forty years oldI've got the scars to prove it, I'm still in those trenches collectingthose scars. You know, I'm not. You know sixty five, seven years old, youknow telling you you know how it should be based on my thirty five or fortyyears in the profession, I'm right there in it with every single rep thatthat is hopefully reading the book and to my knowledge, Jist one of the Olinbooks out there in you know this kind of sale, genre, that's written bysomeone who's still carrying the quota yeah. I really like that angle, and Ithink it's so so important. I can't remember who saidit, but it's kind of like the quote goes show me, don't tell me right a lotof these books. Just tell you what to do based on you don't know when theydid this. You don't know when this happened. They could be a salesconsultant for ten years, but there's nothing wrong with that, but they'retelling you something versus you. It sounds like in this book, you're,essentially showing you know what you do, here's what I did and here's what Ido and take what you want. That's it! That's it and it's you knowit' small things, Scott, that that are not what I call rocket science kind ofthings, but like one example that pops out is o. You know the simple tacticsfor true time: Management as it relates...

...to prospecting as it relates to followup. You know the importance of you know having your calendar planned. You knowtwo three weeks in advance, based on the amount of beatings you haveprospecting, you need to do follow up that might be required little smallthings like like we talked to the beginning when they add up, they leadto big things, and you know the book gets really really granular. I mean weeven get into you know prior to being in the pandemic and dealing with thislittle anecdotal things to look for in face to face meetings, how to observebody language, different supplies that may or may not be in your backpack oryour briefcase. If you're on the road things that might come in handy thatyou don't think of that, you might need so it gets pretty granular and it's got application. You know,obviously for in person stuff, but but also for the virtual selling. That youknow is going on right now and we'll probably go on to the next year or soyeah yeah. I like it all right. I want to dive not too deeply into the thee.Three sections go even you're going to have to go grab the book to get thefull version, but let's walk through the three really quickly. So number onewas kind of like know yourself and be be honest with your with yourself, ifI'm a young seller and we have all the demographics of this listerdemographics or everyone from like a brand new BDR to a manager director,you know Sero, maybe I'm a new celler and I'm questioning my choices. Mydecisions, do you have any advice for how to do? I guess, like honestreflection with yourself like how did you do that early in your your career?Had? How did you have those conversations with yourself yeh? So Ithink the the thing that I gravitated towards when I was earlier in my careerwas what is it that's pulling me in thedirection to want to help people,...

...because I think sales and its most rawform is helping people often helping people solve problems that they knowthey have, or in many cases they don't know they have and you've got to go,discover it for them. So when I would would be early in mycareer- and I would sort of say to myself inhess- is this something Ireally want to do, and you know I got a big number of this quarter. I got a bignumber this year and you know I'm working hard to get there, but I wantto do this forever. What always got me back and centered was yeah. This is what you want to dobecause, inherently you want to help people and you want to help peoplebecause you're a curious person and you like to learn- and I think sales beep,I think, really good sales. People are so curious all the time and they wantto learn. They want to help their customer, and I think, if that's inyour blood and that's in your DNA, that you've got the basics, you've got thekind of raw materials to be a sales person and being a good salesperson.That, for me, was kind of M. my godding principal Scot I like it curiosity is,is huge and yeah just ewhen times gets Ou. You are you're a change agent that helps others.That's what that's, what you're doing so, no matter how big your your numberseems. Just if you can remind yourself that it doesn't quite seem as asdaunting. I like it all right, number number two with this. You saidsomething which I really liked, that the currency of business isrelationships which I totally agree with. I often say a slightly differentversion that a relationship of business es trust, which is essentially a arelationship, same thing, give the listener some advice on navigating relationships early in yourcareer, because I I can point to so many early in my career that somehow comelike full circle, and I never would have thought that it would come fullcircle on my my boss at this time than...

...became. You know a customer here andall this stuff walking through some just some advice n for those startingtheir career, how to think about relationships. If that is the truth,which we both agree upon the currency of Businessis trust in relationships.How do I navigate that before I have many relationships yeah, so what Iwould say is the way that I would think about. It isthis, is you know I might be dating myself, butbut I'm assuming you're familiar with the the movie back to the future, ofcourse, of course, Yeah Yeah Yeah! Well, you know, I would say, if you're ayoung, salesperson and you're thinking about the importance of relationships,and how should I be thinking about Hem in the movie back to the future? Theydevelop this time machine and they can program. You know future time and dateinto this car. That's a time machine. They could go into the future and kindof see how things pen out and the way that I would encourage young people tothink about relationships, developing thoseis early in your career when you're, juststarting out and establishing yourself transport yourself to five ten fifteentwenty years in the future and with the people that you're working with theprospects, the clients, whoever it might be. When you go to the future, when you hopin that time, machime so to speak, are you able to go back to those people? Can they goback to you and can you say wow, it's been five, ten fifteen twentyyears. I remember when we work together and you really helped me solve thisproblem or that problem and one of the biggest things that I love about. Theprofession is being able to go back to those initialclients who were prospects and maybe you're in a different industry, maybeyou're in a different part of the world. You know who knows where live takes you,but if you're young and you can plant...

...those seeds and build thoserelationships and help people out and then know in the future over time youcan always call them. They can always call you. That's a really healthy way to thinkabout developing relationships, because there's a bunch of stuff out theretoday that you know productivity gains and technology and you know getting inthe door quickly and all the great stuff the technology has brought isfantastic. But in the end you know it's about people and if you can, if you canbuild those relationships and have them last over time, that's a valuable thingand young people need to be thinking about that. That was absolute gold. I really reallylike that way of of thinking about it. I think that will be very helpful to alot of the listeners that that's really interesting. I've just like yeah, HeyCoud, this, this relationship that I'm building right now, because this standthe Testin time of like ten years, but this person still take my my callor acopy and ten years from now, can I show that much value in this relationship? I,like it all right, ands yeah goahead. No, I just was going to say and a lotof it goes back to a lot of the principles that are important salesanyway, but yeuther the personalization being memorable being different.Creating a customer experience, that's so unique! They'll, always remember it,and you know you do that and you do that t the right way in those people.Remember you and your team forever, and that makes it that much easier to goback to them in five ten years and say: Hey how or things hats been a whilesince we caught up, but it was, it was great when we work together, what'sbeen going on since make them. Remember you and differangers differentaryourself from anyone else that they're working withon a daily Basi Yeah. This reminds me of literally acall I had yesterday with one of my first one of my first vepies of sales a longlong time ago, head and talk to him and...

...at least five years he's now t a chiefpartner officer at a massive fortune, Hune one hundred company thatoutreaches is trying to work with, and I shot him an out within five minutes.She got back to me. We had an incredible ourlonging CAC CEP, call and yeah it's it's amazing. This NesBusiness Carma is real those relationships. If you're doing goodbusiness with good people, they don't they stand the test of time all rightlast one. This is the the tactical piece and I'll. Let you share any anyof the TACTIS. You mentioned a few of them time, management crediblyimportant. What to bring with you on trips. You want to go deeper on just any one of the the tactics, maybeone of Y R, your favorite ones that aren't that movie, our sales manager wouldn'ttell you you know. I would say for me the one that I continue to goback to. We spoke about it earlier with time management, but it's a small onethat, unfortunately it's just not taught, but it's just a simple one andit's when you look at your schedule and youlook at Your Day and you say: Oh you know today, I'd got three calls. Youknow three Discovery Calls Three Pitch Calls Threedemat, whatever might be taking the time prior to those calls togo to the calendar and allocate the proper amount of followup time. That'sgoing to be required after those calls and you're, probably saying, like you,cest you're crazy, like what hat ou talking about well, I just can't tellyou how often I hear from from sales people of all ages. You know I justI've had such a busy couple of days and now I've got. You know five ten fifteenhours worth of followup based on all the stuff that I was supposed to do,based on all these meetings. I've had- and I just don't know what I'm going todo it and as a result, now I've got to work late until the night er I've gotto work on a weekend and just a small...

...act of saying got three hours worth of calls today. Idon't care who Yeu are whether it even if it's a really bad call. Inevitablythere's going to be some type of followup. I thank you now something youGan have to get back to the client on just allocate that time later that day,the next day whenever it might be so that ultimately you're on top of it andthat's one example from the tactics, peace in the third portion of the bookthat there's plenty others, but that one I find to be most actionablebecause ninety nine point nine percent of Repsore, I speak to just don't do it. I like that one a lot. I like that onealote, it's Kimin, it comes down to you know you control your your time asmuch as you know, things pop up on your calendar and you have to you know, bethere when a prospect or client needs you, like you, ultimately control yourtime. You control your calendar, make sure you block those those times andthere's also this piece when you don't do that fall up. We've all been inthose positions where we have like a build up followup that anxious kind ofenergy. If you know you have a bunch of stuff, you got to do that. You don'treally want to do later. It's going to come with you into calls whether it'ssubconsciously or people pick up on that. So, if you're on top of it and you're doing it, you know that sameday. I think that's great. So tactically, then do you what you do you block fifteen minutesafter each call or block? U An hour block each day, or how do youtactically do that one yeah so tactnically for me and this wee. Wetalk about this a little bit in the book, but I've been subscribing to to amethodology. Since early in my career, there's a method out there called theaction method, which is, it was started by a company called te hands which youknow at one point was acquired by Adobi and my buddy started this company andhe's now at a Dobe. But the action method really simply is what I wouldconsito be the most bullet proof...

...mechanism to both take notes andcapture action items for every call, beating whatever it is. You might haveso for me personally, Scott. What I do is the first thing I do during everycall during every meeting. Is I just as my first to do list item I say allocatetime on the calendar for follow up from this call. So if I'd got a thirtyminute or an hour long conversation with a prospector client, the firstthing I'm doing is saying: Okay later on the day next day, two days afterwhatever it might be, it's going to take me thirty, forty,five sixty minutes to do all the followups required get that on thecalendar and then just do that work in that allocated space of time. I, like it simple, incredibly effective,you'll, be less sdressed out you'll, be less anxious, you'll be much much moreeffective. I could use a a refresh recourse. I think, on this actionmethod. So I'm goingto go look at my calendar next week and I think, makeshim some changes because of this episode. Well, Jesse! It's it's been alot of fun. Man There's a lot in here! I'm excited to get through your book.You have an incredible amount of insight. You'V had an incredible career,so thank you so much for for coming on and sharing your knowledge with us. Nothanks for having me really really great to chat, appreciate the time andyou know we'll keep in touch absolutely absolutely and where, where can peoplego and get your books it on Amazon and you've got a website? What's the best way, yeahbe'St Way to get the book is on Amazon, hard copy, soft copy kindle edition or,if you're, more of a digital audiobook person it's also available on audibleand that's both in the US as well as globally yeiful all right, Jesse. Well,thank you again and for all those that hung out with us. Thank you so muchHivan Tex one day and will seethis was another episode of the Sales Engagementpodcast to help this get in front of...

...more eyes and ears. Please leave us ashining five star revew join us at sales engagementcom for new episodes.Resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out of yoursales engagement strategy, make sure to check out out reached Lio the leadingsales engagement platform. Se You on the next episode.

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