The Sales Engagement Podcast
The Sales Engagement Podcast

Episode 321 · 2 months ago

7 Steps to a Great Cold Call

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you’d like to hear unexpected steps to a great cold call, including brand-new pattern interrupts, then this is the episode for you.

Join us as we discuss with Becc Holland, CEO & Founder at Flip the Script:

  • Why you should get monomaniacal about timing
  • What three metrics to use to know your buyer
  • How pattern interrupts can help you build human connection 

More information about Becc and today’s topics:

For more engaging sales conversations, subscribe to The Sales Engagement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, our website, or anywhere you get podcasts.

Welcome to the sales engagement podcast. This podcast is brought you by outreach, the leading sales engagement platform, and they just launched outreach on outreach, the place to learn how outreach well does outreach? Learn how the team follows up with every lead in record time after virtual events and turns them into revenue. You can also see how outreach ones account based, plays, manages reps and so much more using their own sales engagement platform. Everything is backed by data pulled from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be able to do it as good as they do. Head to outreach Donoh on outreach to see what they have going on. Now let's get into today's episode. Hello and welcome everyone. We are very happy that you're here with us today. I can see everyone rolling in. As always, we are going to throw a lot at you. We're going to make this the most actionable. I'm going to say fifty five to sixty five minutes that that you're going to have, hopefully this month, hopefully this year. Back is bringing some new staff. This is not on flip the script yet. This is a you heard it here first on sales actor. So super exciting before I introduced the legendary that Collin. Super Quick Housekeeping. So number one, he's are recorded. We're going to have this one pinned. There's some slides, lots of media content. So if you do have to jump off, you have ever oneonone with your manager. You got to close a big deal, whatever it is, that's all good. Will have this in your inbox in about twenty four hours. Secondly, you know we have a lot to get through, but we do these live for a reason. These are supposed to be interactive and we want to hear from you. So there is a chat feature. Go down there, introduce yourself, name, title, What Company you're from. Say Hello. It's way more fun when we know who were rocking with. And then number two is there is a QA feature as well. So get your questions in. We want to hear from you. If you have relevant questions, I'll try and get them in throughout. If not, we'll spend a little bit of time at the end running through it. That's the boring stuff out of the way. I know we got a lot to get through. I am joined by Back Hall and back welcome to salesacker. Welcome back, I should say, thank you. I'm excited, excited to have you and I'll let you do kind of your superhero origin story. Who is back Holland? Before we get there, quick shout out to Kingsley, maurts are vind, Lisa Nay, Miss Samantha, Chris Eve, Kevin, Jonathan are van. Everyone got a lot, a lot of people hanging out with us. Thank you all. We're excited for this one. But back. Where did you come from? What's the Superhero or the story of that called Origin Story? From Texas. Live in San Francisco now. was an account executive for six years selling contracts to think good old boys, heating, lighting, cooling, HBAC, the governmental buildings at school districts. Learned a lot and then transition to the bay area to become I thought, well, I can go back into selling or I can become an str and went in Rome do this whole tech thing. Did that work for some sales tech and Martech companies and started to notice a gap between the two approaches. Is An at you as very tailored. It's an str I got all this really fancy tech and how what to do with it, when to do it. That you know how to do all of that was a question mark for me and so I spent, you know, four or five years kind of figuring that puzzle out and then started flip the script as a free you know, after our series that was rogue and had some teeth and was answering some of those questions that I had answered, that I needed to answer as a practitioner for myself and sort of publishing some of those answers. The rest has kind of history. Been having a lot of fun with the the series of the full time company. been a privilege to get to do it. I love it. Awesome Story and today we are talking about the seven steps to having a great cold call. I'm the had. I hand the reins over. Let's dive right into it. Let's give the people what they want. Yeah, so I am I am going to start off with a question. If all of you could pile I know some of you have piled in the chat here. If you could give me your name, company and then number one, if you will are an account executive, that doesn't self prospect A. Number two, if you are a full cycle account executive, that the prospects your entire pipline. A three, if you are an outbound SDR a for if you're an inbound BEDR, and a five if you are some kind of sales or SDR leadership, and a six if you are marketing. But be helpful so I can kind of get some background. Seeing a lot of threes, a lot of twos. Full cycle account executives know ones. That's good. Someone...

...gave some five. What little confused by the zero? Let's get there's always what. So today I'm going to and I don't know if anyone saw the saw the description, but cold calling is done to death. I know there's a topic that is visited quite a bit and so I wanted to do it a little bit differently. This is going to be the seven pieces that have the most impact on cold calls, as opposed to a seven step, sequential step. So I'm going to give everyone a session afterwards. Or if you want to know my script, you know, or my structure suit to nuts, you know, full, full deck all the way through. I'll give you an option for that. But this is going to be the seven steps that are the most important to a cold call, if you will. So why don't we launch in here and if you guys cannot leave me hanging on the line, if you could stack as many questions as they come up in the QA, in the chat, makes it super, Super Fun engaging. For me, that's kind of selfish ass but if you could. Number One. So the first step that is very important that I do not here talked about enough is the timing of your call. So I've been diving, and that a lot into this with some of the teams that I'm working working with, and I feel like quality of call is something that we approach all the time. Should it be personalized as a relevant only? Is it based on buyer persona? How do we handle objections? You know, is it in a really fourth right way? You know, how on is our elevator pitch, etc. But one of the things that I'm finding that can dictate the success of your cold calling strategy. Number one it's a timing of your call. So if you have a great tool like outreach, you can do is very simply by going into clicking on reports and there will be a tab that's called insights and if you hit insights, it will break down for you the best time to Col call. It will break down for you the best time to get a connect and the best time to get a positive reply like a booked meeting, and will also give you the same for email. So I could go on and on about the quality of a call, and I think a quality of the call is a very subjective thing and it can be based on a lot of different indicators and a lot of different variables, like market etc. But timing of the call, you know, Netnet Bridge Group and Topo boat did research on how many dials people are making and they found thirty five and one case and forty in another case. If you're a full time prospector, you're going to make forty dials per day and that's going to yield anywhere from two to three connects. So not to blow up any myths, but I think that we're asking ourselves the wrong question when we're asking about quality all the time, you know. So the first thing that I would want to be monomaniacal about is understanding when is the best time to call. So for the teams that I have been working with, you know, and I initially pick this up from M Jay Hoffman, author of why you? Why you? Now you know, but he essentially did some research and study on when you should reach out to people. What he found was that most often people are making dials Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, boarding which holds true in my experience, and that when the fewest people are making dials is the time when people would be most willing to receive a dial which is Wednesday, Thursday and Friday afternoon. And so when I think through my experience, it's like Monday morning, I'm handling all of these internal meetings, you know, I'm handling fires from over the weekend. I'm essentially, you know, setting all my tasks up for the week. And so the priority that you have to order, the urgency that you have to hit to be prioritized, it's going to be much, much higher than a Friday afternoon. Let's say Friday afternoon. You know, I've kind of used all my gas. You know, I'm I'm looking for those last couple of items to button up the week. And so, based off of his research, I essentially pivoted all of my teams to okay, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday morning, do your research and lay off the actual the actual sending of the emails and the actual cold call. So the great thing about using a tool like outreaches you could time the sending and this is not a product pitch, but I reposition to where they started sending their emails. The theory was five minutes before the hour, after the hour, increasingly throughout the day and increasingly throughout the week. So I pivoted my teams to start sending from two PM to six PM, to stay through Friday, you know, the end of the week, and making their dials during that time as well, and it dramatically increase their response rates, their connect rates and also their booked meeting rate. So not only were they more likely to get a someone connecting with them on a Friday afternoon, but they also were more likely to book the meeting once they were talking to the person. So the first item that I would say very important part of cold calls, and this it holds true with all the teams that I'm working with so far, and I would say I'm working with anywhere from S and B...

...to enterprise and enterprise, and specific as where I'm I'm, you know, living and breathing from a work perspective. And Fair enough, true enough, all the teams that I've been seeing they're making the majority of their dials Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday morning, but the most at time is Wednesday, Thursday and Friday afternoon. So I would double check with my data and pivot accordingly, you know, but that is what I'm seeing hold true, regardless of segment, regardless of industry. For the teens, is at the afternoon is a better time to call. So, you know, I would encourage anyone to look at their own data and I would one last tip on this and then we can go on to piece two. I would not look at my data and say, okay, my best time to call is Wednesday morning at Zeno am, because that's what this my outreach instance, says. It's going to only tell you what's the best time to call out of the hours that you're calling. Right. So you need to run some kind of test of like I'm going to make the same amount of dials every hour on the hour for like a couple you know, I'd say two to three weeks at minimum so I can level out the data set, because it might be that it's saying that you're ten at ten am as your best time to call, it because you aren't making any dials from afternoon. So I would make sure to run some kind of Alpha test where you're making the same amount of dials and sending the same amount of emails, you know, every hour on the hour, for every day of the week, and then running your day data set off the back into that. So, first and most, one of the most important pieces. You know, I've gotten three four us the connector rates with the same quality of dial you know, to the same type of person, and so inherently is going to three or four. I could pipe point that you're going to achieve off the back end for the same amount of effort. So that's one, one and done. I'm uncharacteristically quick Scott today and doing well. I like this face. Let's let's keep it up. I'm going to I'm going to stop because you gave me it an opening. So we have a great and I'm going to yeah, I'm going to tease in there. Ronald Column says, how can we get past the call screener? When making cold calls? They are often instructed to allow only specific types of callers, ie. Not Sales, and then he has a big long sigh after. Yeah. So I mean the Tldr of it is, I think my personal opinion, and I'm probably going to get visceral feedback on this, is you should go direct dial as heavy as you can. You know, and I would think through, especially if you're hunting into s and be mid market, and especially if you're selling it to be tob SASS. You know the I want everyone to think through. Do you have a desk phone and if you do, how often do you get calls on it and pick up those calls and actually do business over that dust phone? And Pre Covid, and now I want to talk about postcode covid. So I it can definitely affect, you know, how willing your or how readily your prospects going to pick up. So you're only going to usually get a gatekeeper. I don't know many people have a gatekeeper for their direct trug cell phone. So the first piece of advice, as I would say, is try to go as direct dial as heavily as you can. So that would I'm going to button it up at that because I don't want to get segueighted into Gatekeeperville for too long. If that's okay to go direct dial as much as you can. Yeah, got it. So it's more of a data problem than it's acting problem. Yes, so you can segment down to for your data vendor. There's only really there's only a few out there, but for the the predominant one, zoom, and so you can segment down to to who as direct dials, you know right off the bat. So it's one of the strategies I've used for Linkedin prospecting, for instance, is when you're going and doing your personalization, you're looking at their their linked in profile, the onset of the sequence, add them and then I have a step on the back end of like twelve, twelve steps later. That's, I think, somewhere around like fifteen business days out that, if they have added you back, send them a message. So that's always my view on linkedin prospecting is that they're not even willing to give you a add back, then like I don't think it's necessarily worth the time to try and engage with them on Linkedin over and mail. You only have ninety of them. So kind of the same mindset when it comes to direct dials. I'm going to attack my direct dials within my Tanna, within my buyer persona first, because it's easier. Did I answer? It's got yeah, let's keep it. Keep it wrong. Yeah, okay. So number two, the second piece. That's very, very important to cold calls and I'm going to hit these out and order of that I see people least likely to do them, the less likely to do them up front. Is Number two. Knowing your buyer. People talk a lot about that, but according to what they're metric done. So people, the great news is that an SDR, if you're selling into an st our leader, let's say, and Sd our leader at outreach and an SD our leader at Oracle and an St our leader at Paloel to and St our leader at Twilio and a star leader at page, your duty are all really...

...going to care about the same thing. Booked meetings. Doesn't matter what company are coming from. Usually what they're metric don is a good place to understand where their heart lies. So I don't need to know most of the people in the line. If you're a one or two, or you answered as a one or two and you're a self cross or your account executive, you care about closed one revenue. Like that's what you care about. I don't need to know who's on the line to really know that. So I think point number two, you know it. SD Our leaders going to be booked meetings. Marketer is going to be nql's. Everyone has a quantitative metric that they are metric to hire or they're hired and promoted, or let go to drive. Typically. So CSM, it's going to be renewal, up cell, Cross cell, you know net retention, you know even hrs going to be empscore or employ churn. But I would be thinking, start to think of your buyer, knowing your buyer in terms of what they are metric on. So there's three different pieces to how you can be metric. So let's start with the the the former, so leading indicators. You have leading, leaning and lagging indicators. So if people didn't know as a billy being fan before now, I will say, full disclosure, I have studied him quite a bit. I'm very nerdy about his background. But leading indicators are going to be inputs that are independent among other indicators that determine the outcome of a lagging indicator. So let's use weight loss, for instance. A leading indicator would be how much food you're eating. You know what the color can take is of those foods, what type of foods you're eating, what's the vitamin count on those foods? How much you're working out? What type of working out you're doing and how long you're doing that working out. Those are going to be the main leading indicators of whether you're going to ultimately get to your goal of losing twenty pounds. So these are inputs for SDRs, for instance. Those are going to be what kind what time of day do you send that outreach? Is it an email? What type of outreaches it? Is it email? Is it a cold calls, a linkedin message? What's the quality? What's the volume? How many people are you sending it to? Are you sending it to the right account? Are you sending it to the right person? And what's the sequence of actions you're taking into totality, there's only eight. That's it. They're a leading indicators for prospecting and so whenever you know these for your prospect and I want you to if anyone's out of me on Linkedin, I want you to go back and look through the engagement on my post over the last two months. I did one post talking about the time of day that you should send it and it had more engagement than any of my other posts, even though it is the least meeting. The point being is because it was a leading indicator. So most people within that role, started liking it and sharing it and sending it across because I hit on a leading indicator there. So I would know the leading indicators for my buyer personas of like those are the ones for str so if I sell into a marketer, the first thing I should know about a marketer is I, instead of knowing product knowledge, instead of knowing feature knowledge, instead of even like knowing my buyer in terms of my own product, know your buyer independent of your product. Know what they care about and know their world, and the quickest way to do it is to figure out what their metric thought. So leaving indicators are inputs. You cannot, cannot isolate optimize for them in isolation, even though people often do. They say more email volume the better, even though they sacrifice quality whenever they do more email volume. But their inputs, they and they determine the output of alagging indicator and they're typically hard to measure. A leaning indicator is a resultant indicator of a leading indicator, but it is not one that you optimize for an isolation, but people falsely do all the time. So the three four stars that are leaning indicators are going to be open rates, response rates, and connect rates. So people would say always more response rates the better. Maybe. So I ran a test on my database. I sent out a thousand emails to someone, to people with their first name in the subject line but the correct first name. Then I sent a the same em email to another fouson with the wrong first name in the subject line. I want you all to jump in the chat and guess which email had a higher open rate and each which email had a higher response rate. Number one, the email that was the correct name, or number two, the email with the wrong name. Right, you're all getting it. Okay, so it's all number two. So second question. Do you think, yes or no, that that meant I got more booked...

...business off of email? To yes or no? Thinga. You're all getting it. So I got no business off of it. I got two hundred and thirty eight vicious responses. People ripped me apart, by the way. A whole bunch of people need some there feeling like I got some mean emails. Don't you call yourself personalization girl? Don't you talk about knowing your buyer, Yada, Yada, Yada. People ripped into me. So the metric would say of a leaning indicator. If you're optimizing for these. Without these the foresight of lagging indicators and what I care about. Then you would say like Oh, that email did really, really well, but I would always caution people to think about is it stacking up into your lagging indicator as well? So point being from my buyers. A second part. You know, second part of my cold call. As I was know they're leading indicators of the inputs. I would know the leaning indicators and then I would know they're lagging indicators. So lagging indicator is a resultant indicator of a leading indicator. So in this case it would be the weight lost. That is an output that can be optimized for an isolation and it's confirming that you are successful. Essentially. So from a graphical perspective, if you want to break it down in your head, on this left side is the the two that you can't optimize for an isolation, which is leading and leaning, and on this right hand side is the two that are dependent on another indicator, which is leaning and lagging. But just think of it like this. If you can't, lagging is going to be the business metric. That there metric gone. Leaning indicator is going to be a real time validation that you're likely trending towards it, and leading is something that you're just cheven in the engine, Cheven in the engine. So I would know these part two and you're going to think I'm crazy and this is going to take you hours to understand. These fear buyers. This is the only thing you need to know before you need to know anything about your product. You need to know your buyer and to know your bier. You just need to know what they they are metric done, what they are fired and hired to drive, because if you know, you know. I'll give a great example and see if people can guess it. For if I have two baseball teams playing against one another, if I the Texas Rangers playing against the New York Yankees, what is the lagging indicator of who is the better team on that day and time? What's the lagging indicator? The score, Bingo, you all got it, the score of who scored the most runs. That is the rules of the game. So that's the only thing that people care about. Doesn't matter if I'm a player on the twins or a player on the Red Sox, or the play her on the white sox or a player for the braves. I care about the score at the end of the end of the game because that's my lagging indicator, right. But bomb nailed it. He gave me a zero earlier on what his role was. But there is no style points in the cave right exactly you're optimizing for the lagging indicator. So know what the lagging indicator be able to spit these for your buyers before you have the temerity to talk to him. So the third type or the third piece of a cold call. That is very important and full disclosure, if you've seen any of my work on personalization, this is new some of it. So every everything I'm going to be doing today has some level of new data. So personalization. What I mean by personalization is one to one messaging. So I think this is the third most important piece of cold calls in today's Day and age. Yes, you can scale it. I'm not going to get into it because I'm going to get two fired up and on a rant. But if you go to flip the script dotcom, there's a whole section called personalization point and I go very, very deep into it. The metrics, the timing. You know how you can scale pass industry activity metric using this system. But point being, the third most important piece to a cold call is that you know who the buyer is, just for a couple of seconds beforehand. So this add worst case scenario. This is a pattern interrupt. Most people don't know who the person is. So the thing that they're forced to talk about it's themselves, my product, my stuff, you know, and best case scenario, you in terms of buy our persona. So number one, it's going to be a great pattern interrupt that you're going to now, instead of trying to stand out among a thousand sales reps for the best pitch, you're trying to stand out among three, because you're the old, you know, one of the three that personalize. Now still very important that you're talking about something it's relevant to them. What's relevant to them is all in the leading, leaning lagging indicator, but personalization is a great way to stand out and let get the attention and then keeping the attention. Comes down to point number two. So the three types and five buckets of personalization. So let's go into the types first. This has never been there before. So there are three types...

...of personalization that you can do, ranking them in terms of where you will see the most hit rates. So the first type is problem centric personalization. So problem centric personalization, I have to give credit to Keenan from gap selling. I've been studying his work a lot recently and he's absolutely amazing. If you haven't checked him out, but he talks a lot about business problem and problem that buy our personas are running into. So problem centric personalization. Yes, Keenan is the man of bombs that came to the man. He absolutely is and his work is ahead of its time. But problem centric personalization is going to be. For instance, I saw, for with teams a lot that their demo request process. Twenty five percent of the people who are requesting a demo are actually getting a demo. Let to say that again if it's not shocking enough. Twenty five percent of the teams who are requesting a demp people who are requesting a demo are actually getting a demo, mostly because of process. So let's argue thirty five percent were unqualified. You still have a delta. You have a Delta a forty percent of people who wanted to see the product who can't because of process. So problem centric personalization would be me personalizing meaning going one to one and I've done this in a number of deals and it's jarring the amount of results or that just from an emotional perspective and how it changed. It changes a deal for the better. But problem centric personalization would be if I go to that person's website and I request a demo and I document my journey and then I talked to them and the discovery call or in the prospecting piece and say hey, did you know that I requested a demo and it took me three and a half weeks to get a demo? I don't know if you're hemorrhaging business, but I think it's likely to guess based on this process. If you give me fifteen minutes on Thursday at to you know ten pack how you can fix that. You know what the pause of impact could be to your conversion rate. You know. Then I promise I won't have you with emails. You Know Hammer you with followed if we're not a fit. So this would be personalizing based on a problem that you solve for businesses. In the personalization piece is you have to test and this is only going to work with things that you can test overtly, meaning some things you cannot Garner whether it's a problem, because it's an internal business use case. But this if you do have an overt that you can notice a problem, or you can notice a symptom of a problem, or you can notice a pain of a problem that they're likely having based on, you know, based on things that you can see from the outside, you will get a viral response. So this is how to drive the most urgency with your buyers. So if I was selling sales training, for instance, Wink Wink, I would want to look up all the IPO companies that have recently ipoed, you know, that didn't hit their q like there whatever q to revenubles. I don't know if they have a problem, but I'm assuming, based on the indicators that I'm saying, that essentially there's something wrong. It's either process, it's either training, it's tactical, it's whatever, you know, but that would be problem centric. personalization is, I know, how to get people, you know, in the room based on these overt triggers that they're having. The personalization would be if I went one to one. The second type of personalization is strong personalization. So I'm just getting so excited. Soupon to talk through this stronghook. personalization is essentially, let's say that I solve for, you know, quality of outreach and in someone's linkedin profile they're talking about how it's all about quality of outreach. So it's a dead on tie. You know, of like they're talking about in there about me section, of how they're really passionate about demand generation and I solve for business use cases within demand generation. So there's nothing cute about it, there's nothing creative about it. It's a dead on tie. And the personalization again is defined as one to one. So I can't talk to you know, talk to Scott and say we work with people like you in terms of x, Y and Z and go broad. That's relevance. The point that you can scale it to many people means it's relevance, not personalization. But if I were to go to Scott, say in your about me section, I loved it when you said it all comes down to quality. What if you could help the quality of your sales conversations? Yada, Yada, Yada. So strong hook is it to dead on tie, there's nothing cute, there's nothing creative and the personalization again is one to one. So in the first problem centric use case. I look to see if they and specific had the problem. They're company in specific at the problem. And the second use case for stronghook I'm seeing is there a dead on tie in terms of the function that I cover and what they say that they cover within their linked in profile. And the third is Lighthook personalization. So lighthook personalization is going to be a conser septual tie. So let's say that Scott, you know that he played...

...basketball at a certain university and I said, what if you could, you know, turn all of your bench players into starting line up, your you know, people you put on the court of the start of the game. You know, for your sales reps over it outreach by x, Y and Z. So this is going to be the least palatable among you know, whatever the sales industry gods that be. You know, some of the thought leaders say like Hey, you know, conceptual ties are a little too cheesy or gimmicky or it doesn't feel real. I'm not going to take an opinion here. All I'm going to take an opinion on is that you do one of them problems, centric personalization, stronghook personalization, and go dead on tie or Lighthook if you can't find the former. To The personalization as a concept, it is I've seen massive results of across all the teams that I've worked with, because at the minimum it's a pottern interrupt so that they're reading your email. So then it just becomes about how effectively are you communicating about the things that they care about in the problems that they want to solve for so those are the three types. Underneath those the ladder two, stronghook and Lighthook personalization, you have five buckets of things that you can personalize on. Yeah, sum Marie said, Hey, I saw that you also love pizza. Right, so that would be Lighthook, unless you're selling pizza. I don't know, cut or or something something to do with pizza, that would be lighthook. If you're not selling pizza, then yes, it's Lighthook. So there's five different buckets of personalization and again, what I mean by personalization is going one to one, and I rank them in order of where you should get your highest response rates. So I would start with problem Centrif ecentric. If I can't find that, I'd go to stronghook and if I can't find that, that I would go to? I would go to Lighthook. So essentially, the first would be, you know, self authored content. So this is going to be anything your prospect authored them self. Webin are article. Post again, you're going to have to hook it either in a strong way or a lightway conceptually. But this is going to be your strongest response rate. And if I had to guess why, I'm going to make everyone jump in the chat. You're not going to you're not going to be in the stands. That this whole thing. So when you post on social media, let's take linkedin. You Post on Linkedin. What do you want to happen to that post? I'm going to make everyone jump in the chat. What's the one thing that you want to happen to your post after you make a post on Linkedin? Yep, share, engage. How? But yet get a response like shares, interaction, engagement, you're all nail in it, brilliant. So my my question. Second question is why? Why do you want all of that engagement? Okay, book meetings, yeah, build trust, help spread the word to make sales, extend your network, exposure, go viral, continued dialog. Okay, now the third tough question. Let's transition for a second to facebook, non business related, but you still want the same thing. So why do you want engagement on facebook? There you go, Chris got it. Pride. Yet Anka got it. All of your getting it self gratification. You want to be cool. The Ego piece of it. So Ego, yes, Marie, it's got it. Egoes the magic word. So social media has taught us three things about ourself. It's been a mirror. Number One, that we all deep down want to be famous. Oh, Samantha got it. Samantha's the winner Goldstein, but he go, Samantha. Number One, that we all want to be famous, and I'd say the biggest one. Number two is that we crave validation from others. We do for better for worse. We do so we like the likes and the shares in the comments, whether it's business or it's personal, because we crave validation from others. So this first bucket self. Author. Content the reason it's stressful for most people. You'll see a lot of people preaching personal branding. You push out a lot of posts and the reason they have to preach on it is because it's tough to post. And the reason it's tough to post is. You don't know whether it's going to do well or not. It's stressful. You're opening yourself up for the world to judge you and for the world to see if, worst case scenario, they didn't think it is relevant at all, the don't like like it or anything. So I'm going to be walking around this apartment, you know, at the end of this session and I'm going to be wondering one question about this session and I want you to jump in the chat and see if you can guess what the question is that I'm going to be wondering. I'm going to be asking myself over it. Yep, on a carready got it. Yep, you're all getting it. Did you like it? Do they like me? Did I deliver value? Chris got it. Was it relevant? Diana got it. You know, how well did I do? That's what I'm going to be one wondering. Did they approve, you know, did they listen? Did they feel like did they think it was relevant? So...

...this self authored bucket. You are really going to win some point. Diana said, do they love me? I'm going to assume that it's a no. So I'm not going to want for that. I'm gonna know that you don't. So so that first bucket of self authored content. If I had to guess why it works so well, it's not only because you're personalizing, but you are validating them. You're validating that their work was meaningful. So it can be a very, very quick response rate and a very, very you know, you want your prospects to root for you. Now, whether they're going to book the meeting or not comes down to are you solving for a problem that they need solved? However, it's always nice to have your prospect rooting for you to have the thing that they want to buy. It can make the difference between, you know, quite a few sales. Second buckets engage content. That's going to be any content that you liked or that your prospect liked, shared or commented on but did not through themself. The third is going to be self identified traits. This is going to be anything in their company line, profile line or about me line. So this is essentially things that people wrote about themselves on Linkedin. You know, they viewed linked as a resume, right, so they're like, you know that help scale teams, bull Bluh makes bad analogies. You know they're going to describe himself LOSERVILLE USA. Anyhow, they're going to describe himself to me about me, section, you know, profile, line, head line, and so that's going to be bucket three of personalization for is going to be too Maritz's I hope that I'm saying your name right. By the way, I'm probably blotching it into oblivion. Please don't put that in the chat, whether or right or wrong. But the fourth bucket is going to be junct or so that's non business related things about your prospect schools attended, personal interests, hobbies, recommendations, skill, endorsements. So this would be they like pizza. Again, you have to light hook it. So if you're thinking pizza, you got to figure out how to Hook Pizza. I don't know what the rules are, but I know that that's the only rule. You have to hook it. So I think a common misconception here that I hear a lot of people say is that this is only for a sales or marketing buyer persona that would like it, and I couldn't disagree more. And also the results from the teams that am working with are very technical companies, almost exclusively technical company as. So I would get creative in this bucket. Just because someone's technical doesn't mean they're not creative. Arguably means they're more creative. So this is where actually works really well for a technical buy our personas, but marketing by our persons love it. Half a sales leaders really, really like it. Some of them don't, you know, the want you to be direct. Hr really likes it. But juncture is non business related. And then five is going to be company levels. So this is MNA, blogs, post hiring, website, language, etc. But all five of these buckets you can do within stronghook. You know, of like they say, they're in demand Jin. You're solving for demand Jin. or You can do lighthook. So, for instance, I know I mentioned Keenan earlier. He's a, you know, big Baddy Ski Skier and Ski Instructor. So strong Hook personalization to him would be, I notice, you're a big Badass gear. You know, we sell whatever, like different skis that help you. Yada, Yada. He's probably going to bar if if he here. Here's this. What's of how that I'm watching it. But stronghook personalization would be you sell ski gear. Lighthook personalization is you want to talk about how skiing all comes down to practice, repetition and technique. What if you could turn your sales reps, you know, via good practice, repetition and technique on their sales called into lethal as ask them. So lighthook gets conceptual, strong, Hook gets dead on. Yeah, and then the fifth is is company level, MNA, blogs, post hiring, website, language, etc. So that's that third piece. Go had super, super quick. Going to jump in at Barbara Specter has a comments, kind of a question. At when does one find the time to do all this research? What would your reaction to that? That be? Yeah, so, should the company be doing this? Should I, as the individual, have to do all of this? How much time would you say a day sales rep should be spending doing this? Yeah, so, Barbara, if you don't mind me asking, are you using a sales engagement tool? Are Using outreach? She like logged off. No, okay. So essentially I would say keep it in a google sheet and I would spend no more than five minutes and you can hunt three personalized premises and that period of time. You know. So I would again you're going for speed and know that personalization, especially in Lighthook, is just a pattern interrupt. It's just so to get noticed, you know. So okay. So if you can do it in zoom in phone gage as well. So if you go into the note section on Zoom Infhone Gage,...

...you can store your personalization there. I go to their profile, spend no more than five minutes to use out three personalized premises and go in this order, you know, of what you can find, and then store them there. And then you only have to do that research once, so whenever you call the person, you have that research at the top. Now I'd find a nice neat way to structure it there. Yeah, so if you just put article they wrote, put the title and put an exert, you know get if you want more on personalization, if you go to flip the script DOTCO. It's free. You can see go to personalization point, and I go really deep in this, but you will only have to spend five minutes to get three personalized premises and that can fuel suit to nets the rest of this sequence. So one of the biggest myths of personalization is that you cannot scale it. And what people mean by scale? If they mean results, I've seen at minimum x results. If they mean activity, I've seen at minimum one point five x activity. So the average activity metric is forty dials, you know, and I think somewhere around the same matched an email. And I was getting my reps with the personalization, hundred percent personalization, thirty five emails at minimum, and I was discounting the emails against our activity metric. That required very little personalization and they were still getting thirty five and I was getting them up to it minimum of seventy dials. So go to personalization point. I think I go into in the math of personalization how quickly you can do that, but it is absolutely within an Eighthour Day. All worst case scenarios, all upper limits of activity. I still only took six hours out of an Eighthour day to completely obliterate the average rep when they were going quote unquote relevance only kind of thing. So anyhow, that's a lot on activity. One more thing before I move on. If you don't have personalization in your emails, you don't need a person to do it Toda. So I would I would be careful what you wish wish for. I think there's an mense amount of value and knowing who your buyer is beforehand for them so I would certainly know something about them. So let's go into the fourth piece, is of cold calls. It's very important. is going to be the INTRO. So this is for my entire session on cold calls. I'm only going to do the first two slides because I think arguably these are the most important or I think the line share of values within these first two slides. But what I'd open with it's hey, this is back calling on our record on line. If you are recorded from flip the script. How have you been? Not, how are you? How are you? Triggers sales rep how have you been? For a moment. They start wondering how they know you. In that meantime you're going to get a plethora of questions. Who is this? Is this a sales call? I'm good. How are you? I'm good. They'll just pause. I would say in any case scenario, if they ask you a question, I'd say that's a great question. Whether that's what's your pricing? WHO YOU COMPETE WITH? Is this a sales call? How do you know me? I'd say that's a great question and I go back into my script for reason for my outreaches, and I'd hit him with personalization some level of personalization. People will not get mad at you if you call them aggressively if you know who they are. If you don't know who they are, that's when they start to get mad, at least in my experience, all the teams that I've seen be doing this. Eid a rep, once, it was this first cold calling job, was working with me and I talked him on personalization. So I said like hey, sure, walk and talk, Baby. Time is money. It's we're like walking, and he's like yeah, so I call this this guy and I'm like okay. He's like the guy hung up on me. I'm like okay, he's like he just hung up, like Oh, Chris, they're going to do so much worse to you and your career. They're gonna do so much worse to you in your career. And he had never experienced someone hanging up on it. So if you you essentially this is the pattern. Interrupted the beginning is you hit them with some kind of personalization instead of making about you or you're being like hey, where the number one that up? Reason why I because I saw you wrote this article where you're talking about x, Y and Z. You know it, saw I was curious to know if you've come across and say your company named before. So, any any WHO. This is the slide for the intro. I'd say. The only only alternative is if they sound really mad, than I usually pattern interrupt here. Then if they say like I'm good, I say hey, time out. Can I level with you? You don't sound that good. That I mess up. The most dangerous thing to your cold calls is your prospect seeing you as a seller. If they see you as a seller, they can do whatever they want, hang up on you, ghost you, ask you for a proposal when they have no ideadn't no intention of buying. That is the most toxic thing to your cold calls and to your sales process is then seeing you as a dead on seller. They see you as a seller and you fit in that role. There is a pattern to every conversation station that you...

...have in sales, something that gets me very riled up, you know, and actually I'm just going to transition into it. It's going off record. There is a pattern to every sales conversation for email. It's this hi, my hi, Scott, my name is Beck and I'm with blank. where the number one blank that does blank? We help blank to do blank. Here are case studies. Do you want to quick, fifteen minute chat? INTRO, looking forward to it, assumptive, closed. Back for cold calls, there's also a pattern, and what's infuriating to me it's people are saying, Oh, it's a pattern, interrupt if you ask them for thirty seconds their time. I'm like no, that's the pattern. That's the pattern of cold calls. So I would think through for everyone on this line. I'm going to challenge you to think through for I would get out a sheet of paper, write email on the left hand side, cold call in the middle and write objections in the right hand side and for email right all of the language that you see. Sales Rep say quick chat, looking forward, you know, looking for for it to it. where the number one blank help? We help blank do blank. Efficiency, visibility, scalability. That's the pattern. So if your prospect opens that email and notice it, it hits the pattern in their mind, they delete it. So I want you to think through when you're reading through email in the morning and you walk into the day and you hit refresh. This morning atter Memorial Day, for the US and you see it implode with all these emails. Do you delete some or do you read every single one of them? Do you respond every single one of them? You know? And if you don't respond every single one of them, did you open everyone that you deleted? And if you didn't open everyone you deleted, how did you know it wasn't you? How are you prioritizing and take that buying hat into your selling process? So I have people scour on a scale a one to ten. How much would I think this subject line was just to me, if I was the recipient, and on scale of one to ten, how much would I know that this was a marketing or did this hit the sales pattern? So for email it's going to be the same thing. For Coal Call it's the same thing. Hey, this is blank. How are you? How about you know, like, how about this? Why don't I take the next thirty seconds to tell you why I called? Sound good. That's the pattern for cold calls. So the minute you hit that pattern, it's not that it's good or bad, it's that you're in the pattern of a normal salesperson. So they're going to treat you exactly like a salesperson. So I'm going to challenge you all for objections. If I if you're prospecting in to me and I say send me an email, what would your natural response be as a salesperson, what would you say back to that? But I said send me an email. Absolutely. What's your email address? Keep going. Okay, Karen, got it. Okay, keep going. What else would you say? What should I send you? Aaron, nailed it, so I can send the right self. What should I send? Bob? Nailed it. Okay. What information are you looking for? Tanner, got it. When do I follow up? Can I ask a few questions? Okay, now I'm going to ask you another one. If you cold call me and I say I'm running into a meeting, what do you say back to me? Or I not not the right time? What do you say back to me as a salesperson? When do I call back? When is it good time? Okay, see you all are doing these live. When's not a bad time? When is the best time? Like on and on. You're all I just want to help, like you're all dead on. That's the problem. That's the problem. If I say I'm running into me into a meeting. I'm so sorry. When's a better time to call the problem with that is now. I want you to put your fire hat on. If you walk into a retail store and I were to walk up to you and I were to say, how can I help you, what would your natural response be? Scott, I'm going to pick on you for this. You Walk into a retail store and I say how can I help you, but would you say that I'm just looking around, just looking. Bob Got it, Jonathan got it just proubly. Jenna got it. Now. Why did she say that, Scott? That's what I've said seven hundred and forty eight million other times. What I've been asked the same question. But couldn't I hypothetically help you because I know the store, store better? For sure? Yeah, so, why does they have? will go back to them and like ten minutes later and be like, Oh, actually, where is this? Totally so, why don't you want my help at Beyoncet? It's just the juristic pattern in my brain that I've heard it so many times that it's I'm just not audibilot. Okay, so I'm going to let you off the hook and make everyone go into the chat. If if you, when you had told a salesperson, send me an email. Do you have any intention, yes or no, of reading that email and responding with a thoughtful response or by taking a meeting?...

No, you're all saying, no, not really, no way. The problem with these objection handles, these are the industry objection handles. I'm going to get heated here for a second. This is what they'll tell you to counter with. The problem with these objection handles is not that they are a bad objection handle. It said it's not the right objection. You're saying send me an email. So, Scott, I'm going to pick on you. You say send me an email. What do you really want from me? I get you off the phone right. So why do you why don't you just say that? It's my question. Why didn't you just tell me that you want to get off the phone and you don't want to deal with me trying to be polite and get you off as quick as possible without being a prick? Toda, we just blew up hundreds of you years of sales history. People are going to come up with blowoffs and they're going to look a lot different. Not The right time, no budget. Running into me being send me an email, in a meeting and thought you were somebody else. You know you're the problem with this is you're saying, Hey, will you go out with me on Friday at seven, and I'm like Nah, man, I'm washing my hair, I'm kind of busy. And then you're sending me using these objection handles. Is like sending me shampoo to make my hair cleaner for longer. would be a really great gift if that was my true objection, but the true objection is that I just didn't want to go out with first right. So, in terms of pattern interrupts, you need, I would think about for all of the dirt different patterns and again I would get out a sheet of paper and write down, for email, for cold call and for objections. What are the objections that I give people and what do I really want to happen? And now you have the Bible, so to speak, of crap that you cannot say, because if you say that, they'll say, send me an email and you'll say what should I include that email, and they'll be like, I don't know, man, just sit over some wow case studies, because they have no intention of reading it. You put your time into putting the case studies together and you send over the case study and then they don't read it. So you need to pattern interrupt at this point in the cold call to root out the real objection, because if you don't, that call is not going to work in your favor. So I think through, you know, we all know them for the sales emails that I send. Just bubbling this to the top, just circling back, just following up here. You know, happy Monday. Hope Memorial Day went well. Covid became a pattern for salespeople. Hope you and your friends or you and your family are safe during these uncertain times. And I would think through that is the Bible of things that you cannot say because you will be seen as a salesperson, which is the most harmful thing to you in the sales process. So in terms of how you can handle these. So for objections and specific and this is the fifth piece of the cold call, is objections and specific, I'd be asking myself two questions about objections. We're all going to be running into the same ones. Not Interested, not the right times and me and email, no time, no budget. Yeah, those are the big the basic ones. Using a competitor, I'd ask myself two questions about objections. Number One, is this real or shallow? Real being defined as they believe that, shallow being defined as it's just a blowoff. And number two, is this objection valid or is it invalid? Valid being defined as it's correct. Invalid being defined as it's not correct, it's incorrect. Some objections are real, meaning they believe it, but they're invalid, meaning it's not correct. So often times, you know, I was selling my last company. I was selling that, I was selling a CEI software, and I would hear all the time of like no, man, we're using outreach, and I'm like, well, outreach isn't really our competitor. It's real, though, meaning they were they were telling me the truth. You know what they thought. So these are the first two questions I'd be asking about any objection. Is it real or is it shallow, or is it valid? As an invalid? If it's real or shallow, I would base off a five criteria. We're at two o'clock. I need fifteen more minutes. Can we do fifteen more minutes? You got it. It's rock and roll. But do you have to drop off? Fine, but I'm not inviting you to my birthday party. I'm telling you stay, stick on if you can, and for those who do have to jump off, we are recording this. Then you're not committed, but but you lose negative two points in beds bags are me. I get it. I spent too much time earlier. Okay, I'll be leaving a waiting, a lagging in the gators. So the five things that I would want to that I would be looking for on is just a real or shallow objection. Number...

...one is a level of detail. More detail, the more likelihood that it's real. Number two is the temperament of the prospect. The better temperament of the prospect, more likelihood that it's real. Very few people will be happy with you and give you a shallow objection. Number three the level of story behind it. So, especially if it's triggered by a recent event. For instance, no budget is historically a blowoff. No budget, and Mark to two thousand and twenty turned into a real objection. People were choking back budgets, they were scared because of the pandemic. So it turned into a real, real objection. So if they have a level of story, the bigger story that they have, and especially if triggered off of a recent event, more likely the likelihood that it's real. Number four, if you're hearing it often from prospects very recently, more likelihood that it's real. And number five, the amount that they know about your product or space or company beforehand. If they don't know anything about your company, I mean I'm like, I'm just going to look for an amen in the chat. How many times have been blown off a salesperson having no idea what they sell? Think about the people they think about the people that come up to you with the clipboard. You know and you don't know what they sell, but you're like, oh my God, like I literally have had my phone go off on my pretend call with my mom and it actually rang while I was finking. So I was on a call it the mom when someone g stame up with a clipboard. Pretty embarrassing. But the more that they know about your company beforehand, the more likelihood that it's a real objection. Now, still could be invalid, still could be incorrect, but more likelihood that it's real. You need to know these and the reason being if it's a if I use what I call the ninety five five objection handling and I don't know the percentages, but ninety five percent of the time people are giving a shallow objection because you're a salesperson, and five percent of the time they're giving you a real objection. The problem with not knowing if it's a five percenter. If I give you a real objection and you try to counter it, I'm going to be pissed into oblivion because I just took the time to explain something to you that I did not need to explain and I'm going to think that you're some insensitive, pushy salesperson that is not listening to me. The problem with the argument that you shouldn't counter the ninety five percent of shallow objections is that ninety five percent of the time it's just a blow off. To your point. I'm just looking. I don't need your help. You know, send me an email. So if you don't counter the ninety five, then you are leaving a lot of meat on the bone. If you don't counter the if you do counter the five, you're going to make some people bad. So these are the five details that I'm looking to understand on whether I believe that it's real or shallow, and now we can talk about what to do about it if it's a shallow object objection, and all shallow objections I would define as invalid. I would counter like this, and here's a couple of examples on the left of not interested running into a meeting, amend a meeting, and I thought I took took this call because I thought you're somebody else. Send me an email. The first thing I do is you need a pattern interrupt by going, quote unquote, off record. There's a number of ways to do this. I would say, can I time out? Can I level with you? Can I hold on for a second? Can I be real with you for just a second? All examples, but you essentially want to give them the permission to go off record with you so that they see you as a human hey, can I level with you? Like they say, send me an email, and I'd say, Hey, time out, can I level with you? I've been hearing send me an email a lot recently. The second step is you wanted to play elephant in the room, meaning you want to give your best guess as to what they're actually saying to you, and a very calm and a very positive tone, and I'm getting the feeling that that's just your polite way of saying go away, you annoying sales rep I don't want to talk to you again. Did I get that right? What's going to happen at this piece is they're going to do one of two things. Three, they're going to say no, you actually didn't get that right. I am running into a meeting and I do want you to send me an email, and they're going to double down. So that means that you guessed wrong. It was a real objection and they'll double down and no harm lost. At that point. I would follow what they're saying. I would send them an email, you know, and I would include whatever, whatever they say. Majority of the time you'll hear and break down. If you do it right, they're like yeah, I'm sorry. And step three is you need to empathize with them. You I've just called them out that...

...they are lying to you. Don't forget that. Empathize with them and empathize with them by basically saying you do the same thing, because, according to this chat, you do. I get it, you know. I say the same the same thing when I get cold called out of the blue. How about this? And I would go into a prospect pack. A prospect pack is in agreement with your prospect a packed, if you will, of what's going to happen in the next time frame, what the outcomes are going to be, and you're looking for their consent. So there's four different pieces to it, commitment, agenda, outcome and consent. But essentially you can use prospect packs, and I suggest you do with the selling process within the you know, cold calling process. This on this one looks like this. How about this? You can me the next twenty seconds to give you my best dog and pony show on who flip the script is and why I thought we might be a good fit for you and your team over Oracle. At the end of that twenty seconds, you can tell me whether it makes sense to continue the conversation from there. That a deal. The structure is this that you can influx your own words to this prospect pack. So in review, someone says, Hey, can you send me an emailt I say, Hey, I'm out kind of level with you for a second. Just pause, I'll go yeah and I go. I've been hearing some an email a lot from people and I'm getting the feeling that's just your polite way of saying go away, annoying sales rep and you don't know how to break it to me that I'm awful. That I get that right, you'll hear a break down. will go no, it's not you, it's yeah, that's it. That's what I was saying and I'd say I get it. Actually did that to three people already today. You know, give whatever story you want to, like the truth, like I do that all the time. You know, my mom called me earlier and I said I'm in a meeting. I wasn't in a meeting. MOM, if you're watching this, I wasn't in a meeting. How about this? You can me the next twenty seconds to give my best dog and pony show on who we are why I thought we might be a fit. At the end of that twenty seconds, you could tell me where there makes a conversation. You want to continue a conversation from there. This will get you ninety five percent conversion if you want to spike it to a hundred. What you're bartering with is that they give you twenty seconds and that you will go away if you want to turn this in my experience, am I rush. Always would give me an AMM who have worked with me. You'll get ninety five percent conversion with this. If you want to get a hundred increase the barter that you're bartering with. How about this? You give me the next twenty seconds or you let me ask you two questions and after there's two questions, if I'm still not relevant, I'll never call you again. You will get a hundred percent conversion people let you ask the question. They think in their head that there's some list and some guy like forty years ago and Iowa or somewhere said like hey, just tell them to take you off their list and like legally, bro Go, go to jail, like that's the myth right and intact. We're like, there isn't really a list, it's a crm, but tomato, tomato, just tell them you'll never call them again and don't move V on. You know have the integrity to hold it. So that's for shall objections and we're going to unfortunately going to have to close with real and bout so I can stay on time. But real invalid objections. I would say you're going to do the exact same plant. So as a reminder, real invalid objections are going to be objections they believe but are incorrect. So, for instance, they tell you they're using a competitor that's not your real competitor. Or they tell you you're too expensive, when you just updated your pricing and actually you're the lowest vendor in the space when it comes to pricing. Or they say, here's a good one, I'm not the right person, but there within the right buyer person of who you want to talk to. So that's a real objection, but it's invalid. Invalid what you do there. So I'm going to make everyone jump into chat for one last piece of engagement. When you see AK Speaker, for instance, and it's kind of like this, when you see a speaker ask a questions, God, I'm going to ask you of going to pick on you for this one. You see US speak, you're at a conference with two thousand people, ask a question and they open it up to the floor. How often or how many people, percentagewise, will raise their hand to answer the question? If you get a thousand people at say, maybe ten percent, maybe five percent right. And why do you think everyone's nail on it here, John, Chris, Karen, five to ten percent. Why do you think that's so low. Why do you think the majority of people, people don't answer? Do you think that they didn't didn't know the answer, or fear of judgment? Bingo, they don't. Aaron, when's the Gold Metal? Twice? They don't want to be wrong. So, Aaron, Scott both I'm going to ask everyone in the chat. Why would you? Why? Why is being wrong? Why are...

...you afraid of being wrong? Think you do like the risk reward and you're like, if I'm wrong, I'm going to look really stupid, and if I'm right, well, like I'm expected to be ready right. So my next question is, why would you raise your hand at all? So we know that it hurts our ego for wrong, because we're wrong in front of a thousand people. So why would you? Why would any of the five percent raise their hand at all to answer the question? If that's the risk, Chris Gott it, we got ego. Yeah, you appear smart. You get a little moment of glory, right, you get a moment of glory. Having the wrong or right answer is very important to people. So in the same same situation, if I'm wrong and I'm wrong in front of a thousand people, I am under the table. If I'm right and I'm right in front of a thousand people. It's a major ego trip for us. Of like I just nailed it. So the problem with countering a real invalid objection, and again this is one they believe that's not correct. That how I normally see it countered, is people are like, well, that's not a real competitor or that's not all right pricing. So you are slapping them in the face telling them that they have a wrong answer and then you're asking them the favor of getting thirty minutes of their time their stay get too. So it's not that, but you can't let them continue in the wrong answer. So that the twist is very minor. It's the same exact objection handle for shallow, but with a minor twest. Hey, can I level with you? You know, or can can can we just time out for a second? I've been hearing we're using blank, let's say, it's not the right competitor, a lot recently and I'm getting the feeling it's because of how poorly I'm explaining it. So the twist is you want to attribute the reason that they have the wrong answer to you. So you take the blow for why they essentially didn't have the right answer. If you don't, then you're going to tell they have a wrong answer and they're going to go hugs the education and they're going to hang up the phone. But if you say I'm getting the feeling it's because of how poorly I'm explaining it, I think you are the right person. And then give them, give them the update. We actually don't compete with this person or that's actually not our price model anymore. How about this? And you take them into a prospect path. You give me the next twenty seconds to give you my best dog of a pony show and you're going to have to dealt it a little bit on who we are and what we actually do and who we do compete with. You know, or why I think we sell to be piece of sales like you in specific and at the end of that twenty seconds you can tell me whether or makes sense to continue the conversation from there. So kind of in review, here the difference between shallow objections and real, invalid is very slight. Instead of saying what they're actually communicating. The first case, he said I've been hearing some an email a lot recently and I get the feeling it's your polite way of saying blank. Did I get that right? And the when they have a real objection but it's not correct, I would say, Hey, can I love with you? I've been hearing we compete with blank a lot recently and I'm getting the feeling because it's of how poorly I'm explaining it. You got a pardon me, I'm new, and you need to take the emotional hit for why they have the wrong answer and then confirm the truth form. We actually don't compete with that person. How about this and take him into the same exact type of prospect path. So from an emotional view it will open them up, but you know, from a structure perspective again, you're going to tease out right here, you know, for the shallow objections right here. If they double down and they say no, I'm actually running into a meeting that I'd say up, that's a real objection. You need to follow follow suit. But if they a for the ninety percent, they'll break down for go. Yeah, I've actually not running into it. Maybe and I'd be like, it's okay, I would do the same thing to me too. I'm not that good and open up the conversation and become the one person that they don't view as erupt so they don't treat you as a rep and they'll give you the opportunity to pitch. So I unfortunately I think we need to end there because we've gone through a lot. I have a another section on pattern interrupts. There's for pattern interrupts from a high level. If you want to see them, if you go to flip the SCRIPTCO Click on silver bullet central and I cover ego states, I cover who they send to and I have one on elephant in the room, I have one on the truth point, I have one on classic rolled diffusion and I have one on the not to switch. So these are four different pattern interrupts and specific that you can use on cold calls. But the goal is here from a high level. And then we close out. The goal is you have three ego states in your body, child, parent and adult. It's extremely...

...dangerous to sell and child or parent. So you need to pattern interrupt out of those and enter into the adult ego state. And how you lead means you know will assend to how they respond as a prospect. So from a high level, if you go to the website. I cover ego states and I have those four different pattern erupts, but those the ones unfortunately didn't get to today. I love it. That's it. Thank you. That's it. As always, Jam Jampack full of stuff that we didn't get to. All of the questions. Do connect with back on Linkedin. Send her a note. She's pretty good at getting back to people. So if we didn't get to your questions at back, check out flip the script and stop Bob as a question. When are you hitting the road again? So I am hitting the road he mentioned. So I am hitting the road with the wonderful Tenn and I'm also hitting the road with a wonderful Scott Barker. I'll be there. It's going to be a three tour. We're going to do nine cities free. You're going to get food for free, training for free, the whole thing. So if you go to flip the script dotcom and you click free tour, it's going to be kicking off October twelve through twenty eight and we are going to Boston, New York, Chicago, Raley, Atlanta, Austin, Salt Lake City, La and we're finishing in my town, San Francisco. So if you're in one of those cities and you want to come out, you're going to see whole bunch of different surprises. But keenan and I are going to be doing several different lectures in the whole night's going to be no charge to anyone who wants to show up. So if you go there you can pre register and get behind the scenes updates. We're going to release a website for a proper registration, but I will say full disclosure. Last year, with no marketing, we sold out within like or sold out within like two days. So I would preregistered because we're going to give a couple days shoehorn to anyone who pre registers to go ahead and get their tickets. It's not the way. That's my CTA. I love it. I hope you'll join us. Hope to see there. I'll be going around with back on this crazy bus and hope to see all of you in your hometown back. Thank you so much. Have an awesome day and I'm excited to another one of these with you, sir. Thank you very much, everyone. Bute. Bye. They ever one. This was another episode of the Sales Engagement podcast to help this get in front of more eyes and ears. Please leave us a shining five star review. Join US at sales engagementcom for new episodes. Resources in the book on sales engagement to get the most out of your sales engagement strategy. Make sure to check out outreach that ioh, the leading sales engagement platform. See you on the next episode.

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